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Type 2 Diabetes Patient Education Handout

Diabetes Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Patient Education Materials

Ethnic Foods and Blood Sugar: Guides for Patients Cambodian Foods That Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Cambodian Patients This presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is culturally tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Cambodian Americans. Authored by Julianne Williams. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. The narrated file may take a few moments to load. Scroll-over video for table of contents. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Ethiopian and Eritrean Patients with Diabetes This presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is culturally tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Ethiopian and Eritrean Americans and includes photos of foods, meal comparisons, portion sizes, and some information about managing diabetes during periods of fasting. Authored by Mei Yook Woo. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Iraqi and Syrian Patients with Diabetes This education is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Iraqi and Syrian Americans and includes photos of foods, meal comparisons, portion sizes, and some information about managing diabetes during periods of fasting. Authored by Toi Sennhauser. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Latino Patients with Diabetes This bilingual presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during Continue reading >>

Racgp - 5.3 Patient Education And Self-management

Racgp - 5.3 Patient Education And Self-management

5.3 Patient education and self-management General practice management of type 2 diabetes 20162018 5.3 Patient education and self management All people with type 2 diabetes should be referred for structured diabetes patient education Diabetes education should be delivered in groups or individually Diabetes education should be culturally sensitive and tailored to the needs of socioeconomically disadvantaged populations *Refer to Summary, explanation and source of recommendations for an explanation of the level of evidence and grade of evidence Education to support self management is an integral part of diabetes care. Patients and their carers should be offered a structured, evidence-based education program at the time of diagnosis, with an annual update and review.57 Educating people with diabetes about their condition and its treatment will assist in self management.5860 In addition to the team members mentioned in Figure 2, patients can obtain further education and support through Diabetes Australia and the NDSS, and their state or territory diabetes organisation. More information is available at www.diabetesaustralia. com.au and www.ndss.com.au Multiple online support and education programs may be available for patients who are unable to access face-to-face group meetings. However, there are few studies on the individual effectiveness of these programs. More information is available at www.diabetesaustralia.com.au and www.adea.com.au/members/adea-website Self management involves the person with diabetes working in partnership with their carers and health professionals so they can: understand their condition and various treatment options contribute to, review and monitor a plan of care (eg care plan) engage in activities that protect and promote health monitor and mana Continue reading >>

Patient Education Materials

Patient Education Materials

NEW! Introducing 40 Educational Handouts on Using Insulin Low Literacy and Very Low Literacy Versions Available ACU and the Nurse Practitioner Healthcare Foundation announce the release of 40 educational handouts for patients who are starting insulin. Each handout is written in easy to understand language with simple illustrations. The handouts are available in both English and Spanish and two literacy levels: low literacy and very low literacy. The handouts are free to download and distribute. Using Insulin to Treat Your Diabetes: What It Means for You English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) About Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Insulin Syringes and Pens English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Injecting Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Needle Safety English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Managing Daily Doses of Insulin English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Measuring Your Blood Sugar English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Tracking Blood Sugar Results English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Diet and Exercise English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Travel Tips English, low literacy (PDF) / very low literacy (PDF) Spanish, low literacy (P Continue reading >>

Handouts, Web Resources

Handouts, Web Resources

Please read this first, to help you find what you want! To search this page use "ctrl" + "f" on pc or command + f on mac and input your search word. For health education handouts and websites, see below. For links to user manuals for "Diabetes products" - click here . For "More Help!" for topics like diabetes supplies coverage, foot care, psychosocial counseling and more, click here . For in-person classes in the Calgary area on diabetes, weight, osteoporosis and more, call the Alberta Healthy Living Program 403-943-2584 and visit your Primary Care Network's website or call Health Link at 811. For more information, please review below and consider visiting My Health Alberta . For your safety, the information in these handouts and resources should be reviewed with your healthcare provider. To add March 2017: Insulin Pen Smart Cap Added:Diabetes: Percent Carbohyrate in Foods For a printable list ofDiabetes Resources for Patients (diabetes question-lines, classes, urgent help, routine 1:1 care) click here . South Asian CDA Food and Nutrition Tools Alberta Health Services Nutrition Resources for diabetes can be downloaded and ordered at Nutrition resources online . Login to the resource order page with id: NFSpublic and password: 2014nfs03. Search the catalog for handouts of topics. Click on the picture of the handout you want, then click the printer icon. Many handouts can be downloaded or printed. Some handouts are indicated for RD use only and would need to be ordered. Your dietitian and diabetes team will help you decide how to match insulin to carbohydrate. This usually includes counting grams of carbohydrate. The following are some of the many tools available for determining the carbohydrate content of foods. Labels: Subtract the grams of fibre from the grams of carb Continue reading >>

Diabetes Handouts – Diabetes Resources – Vol.2

Diabetes Handouts – Diabetes Resources – Vol.2

Please select from the following sub-categories of diabetes handouts and diabetes resources found on this page: What is Diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases with high levels of blood glucose (sugar). This can happen from problems with insulin being produced, how your body uses insulin or both. The exact cause of diabetes is not known. Genetics and environmental factors appear to play roles. Type 2 diabetes develops when the body does not use insulin properly. In response to this, the pancreas produces more insulin. Over time, the pancreas will not make enough insulin for the body’s needs. This results in increased amounts of glucose in the blood while the cells are starved of energy. After a while, the high blood glucose damages nerves and blood vessels. This damage can result in complications. Heart disease, blood vessel disease, kidney disease, nerve problems, and gum infections are some of the complications. These complications can lead to stroke, blindness, and amputation. How can type 2 diabetes be prevented? Some changes that can reduce the risk of diabetes are: Reach and maintain a reasonable body weight Make wise food choices most of the time Be physically active every day Take prescribed medications Diabetes Resources for Adults 4 Steps to Control Your Diabetes for Life – This brochure gives an overview of four key steps to manage your diabetes and live a long and active life. This brochure is also available in a number of different languages – please see the following: Control Your Diabetes. For Life. Tips to Help You Feel Better and Stay Healthy – This tip sheet provides an action plan for diabetes control that includes tips for knowing blood sugar levels, reaching blood sugar goals and maintaining blood sugar control. Do You Know the He Continue reading >>

Scripts Program A Whole New Way To Provide Patient Education

Scripts Program A Whole New Way To Provide Patient Education

Home / Resources / Products / Scripts Program A whole new way to provide patient education Scripts Program A whole new way to provide patient education If you like customized teaching materials then check out this weeks New Products from Pritchett and Hull and be one of the first 50 who sign up to receive a free demo of their new Scripts education program. The originator of commercially prepared patient education materials announces the next generation of materials Pritchett & Hull Associates began publishing patient education materials in 1973. The company began with the main focus of creating materials that patients could understand and that would give them the information they needed to know about their disease, procedure or recovery. And, that the materials would be illustrated to help communicate the content. They believed then and now, that humor helps in healing. So P&H materials uses humor in the illustrations to ease anxiety and foster a good feeling from the patient. Pritchett & Hull has been the leading provider of high quality materials ever since. In 2005, P&H introduced a web-based print-on-demand patient education product, called scripts from Pritchett & Hull. This is the next generation of patient education materials. It offers the flexibility to healthcare providers to give each patient only what is needed at that time in their disease management or recovery, but allows for comprehensive coverage when the provider determines the need for it. Customization is an important factor in scripts. The product allows for customization: at the institution level with Notes whenever the institution has a specific policy or discharge instruction that needs to go with a handout, Notes provides a way for this. The Note can be created once for that handout and will au Continue reading >>

Patient Education Handouts

Patient Education Handouts

Provided here are some handouts available for print and electronic use developed by healthcare professionals and organizations in Alberta to help inform patients on important topics in managing their diabetes. You can brand these PDFs by adding your own logo to the PDFs but you need to have an account first. If you already have an account you can login below. If you need to create an account, fill in the fields below, and we'll get a new account set up for you in no time. You can brand these PDFs by adding your own logo to the PDFs but you need to have an account first. If you already have an account you can login below. If you need to create an account, fill in the fields below, and we'll get a new account set up for you in no time. Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication for a Barium Enema Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication for Gastroscopy or EGD Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication for HBT for Lactose Intolerance Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication for HBT for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Adjusting Your Diabetes Medicine and Diet for a Test or Procedure Adjusting Your Medication for Fasting Blood Tests Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Self Management Patient Education Materials

Table of Contents Click on any of the links below to access helpful materials on managing all aspects of diabetes that can be printed and given to your patients . Introductory Information 1. Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., insulin) 2. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Symptoms, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment (e.g., medications) 3. Women and Diabetes: Eating and weight, pregnancy, and heart disease 4. Men and Diabetes: Sexual Issues and employment concerns 5. Diabetes and Your Lifestyle: Exercise, traveling, employment, sexual issues, and special considerations for the elderly General Self-Care (e.g., Blood Glucose, Foot Care) Blood Glucose 6. Pass This Test: Testing blood glucose levels 7. Get off the Blood Glucose Rollercoaster: High/low blood sugar symptoms and treatment A. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Oral Meds): Patient log to record levels B. TOOL: Blood Sugar Monitoring Log (Insulin Meds): Patient log to monitor levels Feet 8. Foot Care for People with Diabetes: Hygiene, inspection, and when to call your physician C. TOOL: Foot Care Log Patient log to record self-inspections and any problem areas D. TOOL: Injection Sites Patient log to help rotate injection sites Exercise E. TOOL: Planning Your Exercise: Guide to help patients design an exercise program F. TOOL: Physical Activity Log: Patient log to record physical activity 9. Exercise in Disguise Finding ways to exercise at home and outside of the gym 10. Exercising Like Your Life Depends on It: Health benefits to exercising 11. Hot Weather Exercise: Taking extra care when exercising in hot weather Nutrition/Health Diet/Weight Loss 12. Managing Type 2 Diabetes through Diet: Suggestions for balancing your diet 13. Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes: Weight loss be Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Self-management Education?

What Is Diabetes Self-management Education?

Diabetes self-management education helps people to stay healthy and prevent costly complications, yet very few people with diabetes attend a course. Diabetes UK's Taking Control campaign aims to increase the provision and uptake of diabetes self-management education, so that everyone with diabetes has the skills and confidence to take control of their condition. This page gives healthcare professionals and local decision makers more information about patient education options. It includes resources to use with your patients and advice on improving uptake. People learn about their condition in different ways. A useful framework for understanding diabetes education, broadly based on a model used in Scotland, is in three levels: Level three: Structured education that meets nationally-agreed criteria (defined byNICE/SIGN), including an evidence-based curriculum, quality assurance of teaching standards and regular audit. Level two: Ongoing learning that may be quite informal, perhaps through a peer group. Level one: Information and one-to-one advice. Level three education: what is the evidence base? Diabetes education courses, often known as structured education, improve key outcomes, reduce the onset of complications and are cost effective or even cost saving. For a summary of the published evidence on structured education download Diabetes UK's reportDiabetes Education: the big missed opportunity in diabetes care (PDF, 285KB). Level three education: how to improve uptake and quality A short guide from Diabetes UK, including what your patients need to know about diabetes education and tips to improve attendance (see also key downloads).A short guide from Diabetes UK, including what your patients need to know about diabetes education and tips to improve attendance (see also Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you may be able to delay or prevent developing it by making some lifestyle changes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include Being very thirsty Urinating often Feeling very hungry or tired Losing weight without trying Having sores that heal slowly Having blurry eyesight Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Patient Education: The Abcs Of Diabetes (the Basics)

Patient Education: The Abcs Of Diabetes (the Basics)

The content on the UpToDate website is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions. The use of this website is governed by the UpToDate Terms of Use ©2017 UpToDate, Inc. All topics are updated as new evidence becomes available and our peer review process is complete. What can I do to stay as healthy as possible if I have diabetes? — If you have diabetes (sometimes called diabetes mellitus), the most important thing you can do is to control your "ABCs": "A" stands for "A1C" – A1C is a blood test that shows what your average blood sugar level has been during the last few months. "B" stands for "blood pressure" – If you have diabetes, controlling your blood pressure is just as important as controlling your blood sugar. High blood pressure puts you at risk for heart attack, stroke, and kidney disease. "C" stands for "cholesterol" – Cholesterol is a waxy substance found in the blood. High cholesterol is another factor that increases your risk of heart attacks, strokes, and other serious problems. Why are my ABCs so important? — Compared with people who do not have diabetes, people who have diabetes are 2 to 3 times more likely to have a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes also have heart attacks at a younger age, and that are more severe and more deadly. Plus, people with diabetes are much more likely to get kidney disease. By keeping your ABCs under control, you can lower your risk of these problems by a lot. Isn't my blood sugar the most important thing? — Keeping blood sugar low is important in preventing some problems caused by diabetes, including: Eye diseases that lea Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Live a long and healthy life with type 2 diabetes. This website can help you understand diabetes, health management, and diabetes treatment. Using this Website This website can help you learn about, and live a healthy life with type 2 diabetes. It is divided into 3 main sections: The modules can be read in any order. However, if you are newly diagnosed, it is best to start at the beginning in Understanding Diabetes, and work your way through the material. Below you will find a guide to each module. As you will see, depending upon your individual therapy, you can choose exercise guidelines and self-management sections that are specific for your diabetes treatment. Additionally, throughout the program, Self-assessment quizzes are available to help you monitor your progress, and how much you are learning. The Modules are: Additional modules: Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Patient Education Handouts | Pediatric Patient Education | Aap Point-of-care-solutions

Diabetes | Patient Education Handouts | Pediatric Patient Education | Aap Point-of-care-solutions

This is the touchback warning message modal. The following terms and conditions are an agreement (the Agreement) governing your access and use of the [Pediatric Care Online (PCO)] website(the Website) and its content (collectively, the Materials). Please read these terms carefully. If you agree to all of the terms ofthis Agreement please click the I Agree button below to indicate your acceptance and you will automatically be taken to the Website. If you do notwish to be bound by these terms, you may not access or use the Materials - in such event you should click the I Do Not Agree button below and followthe instructions to obtain a refund of any subscription fees paid by you. 1. Materials. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) hosts the Website and related Materials on its servers and makesthem available via the Internet to subscribers for non-commercial research and education purposes and for use in providing healthcare services. Inconsideration of payment of the applicable subscription fee, the AAP is willing to provide access to the Materials to you and, if applicable, your Users(as defined below), subject to all of the following terms. You acknowledge that certain portions or content of the Website or Materials may containinformation, materials or content provided by a third party provider or licensor (a Provider) and that the liability and obligations of suchProviders is limited as provided herein. (a) Subject to the terms of this Agreement, the AAP grants to you a non-exclusive, non-assignable and non-transferable right to access and use theMaterials for the purpose of providing healthcare services to your patients (the License). (b) User means you and your authorized users for whom a subscription has been activated. For individual enrollment use of the Mater Continue reading >>

Primary Care Clerkship Patient Education Handouts [195]

Primary Care Clerkship Patient Education Handouts [195]

Primary Care Clerkship Patient Education Handouts Primary Care Clerkship Patient Education Handouts JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Primary Care Clerkship Patient Education Handouts [195] Persistent link to this collection: The Primary Care Clerkship (PCC) was, until April of 2009, a required 8-week interdisciplinary course for all third and fourth year medical students. For several years, students had completed a course project which involved answering a clinical question generated during patient care in their primary care clinic. In addition to summarizing the research available to answer this clinical question, students also translate this medical language into a document suitable to inform an average patient on this topic a Patient Education Tool (PET) handout. This project has been continued in the required, 4-week, Family Medicine Clerkship , that began May of 2009. Given the time and energy invested by students in creating these handouts and the overall high quality of the final product, the course directors were eager to make these products more generally available to the public through this site. The information provided does not necessarily reflect the views of the University of Minnesota Medical School physicians and faculty. These materials are provided for informational purposes only and are in no way intended to take the place of the advice and recommendations of your personal health care provider. You use the information provided in these handouts at your own risk. Continue reading >>

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