diabetestalk.net

Type 2 Diabetes News Articles

Type 2 Diabetes: Using Coffee For 'glucose Control'

Type 2 Diabetes: Using Coffee For 'glucose Control'

Type 2 diabetes: Using coffee for 'glucose control' One day, people with type 2 diabetes might be able to regulate their blood sugar by drinking tea or coffee, thanks to synthetic biology. Coffee could hold the answer to managing type 2 diabetes. Scientists at ETH Zurich in Switzerland have designed and tested a synthetic gene circuit that responds to beverage concentrations of caffeine. It achieves this by releasing a glucose control compound used to treat type 2 diabetes . The researchers inserted the circuit into cells and implanted them into diabetic mice. They showed that coffee consumption brought down blood glucose levels in line with different doses of caffeine. Once the caffeine had entered the mice's bloodstream, it activated the synthetic gene circuit, causing it to release the compound to bring down glucose levels. The researchers report their findings in a study paper published recently in the journal Nature Communications. Diabetes is a growing public health problem that affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. The epidemic is primarily due to rising rates of type 2 diabetes, a condition that develops when cells lose their ability to employ insulin to convert glucose, or blood sugar, into energy. In the United States, approximately 23.1 million cases of diabetes have been diagnosed the vast majority of them type 2. The estimated annual cost of this burden exceeds $245 billion. But even though treatments have advanced significantly over recent years and can significantly reduce the risk of complications, diabetes is still the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. This burden could be reduced if more individuals achieved the treatment targets recommended by their doctors. Experts suggest that we need better "models of care" to tackle the probl Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Good News And The Bad News And What Next For Thefuture

Diabetes: The Good News And The Bad News And What Next For Thefuture

Diabetes: the good news and the bad news and what next for thefuture Diabetes: the good news and the bad news and what next for thefuture Reader School of Medicine, University of Dundee Calum Sutherland receives funding from the Medical Research Council and Diabetes UK to support research into the causes of all forms of diabetes and its health complications. Alarming stories about the diabetes epidemic that threatens millions of lives and the NHS itself have become commonplace, and with good reason. Around 4.6m people in the UK are living with diabetes while a further 12.3m are at increased risk of developing it. The NHS spends an estimated 14 billion a year on treating diabetes and its complications . But there is some positive news amid the gloom. I chaired the 2018 World Congress on Prevention of Diabetes and its Complications , where experts from around the world came together to discuss progress in both science and prevention programmes. Sometimes known as juvenile diabetes due to the age patients are normally diagnosed, type 1 is an autoimmune disease that attacks insulin-producing cells, leaving patients facing a lifetime of injections and deteriorating health. Improved care has focused on the ways that insulin is delivered and on minimising the impact of health complications on daily life. Scientists are now more convinced than ever that this type of diabetes can be prevented . Although type 1 diabetes is only 5% of all diabetes, it still accounts for tens of thousands of patients who face health challenges every day and require a lifetime of medical support. The impact of prevention of type 1 diabetes would be significant. The two breakthroughs that underlie this new optimism relate to early detection and prevention therapy. The genetic risk of type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

A radical low-calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetes, even six years into the disease, a new study has found. The number of cases of type 2 diabetes is soaring, related to the obesity epidemic. Fat accumulated in the abdomen prevents the proper function of the pancreas. It can lead to serious and life-threatening complications, including blindness and foot amputations, heart and kidney disease. A new study from Newcastle and Glasgow Universities shows that the disease can be reversed by losing weight, so that sufferers no longer have to take medication and are free of the symptoms and risks. Nine out of 10 people in the trial who lost 15kg (two-and-a-half stone) or more put their type 2 diabetes into remission. Prof Roy Taylor from Newcastle University, lead researcher in the trial funded by Diabetes UK, said: “These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated. This builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. “Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we’re seeing … is that losing weight isn’t just linked to better management of type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission.” Worldwide, the number of people with type 2 diabetes has quadrupled over 35 years, rising from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. This is expected to climb to 642 million by 2040. Type 2 diabetes affects almost 1 in 10 adults in the UK and costs the NHS about £14bn a year. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated with medication and in some cases, bariatric surgery to restrict stomach capacity, which has also been shown to reverse the disease. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Late Breakfast Could Drive Obesity

Type 2 Diabetes: Late Breakfast Could Drive Obesity

Type 2 diabetes: Late breakfast could drive obesity Going to bed later is linked with obesity in people with type 2 diabetes, and the main factor that drives this relationship is eating breakfast later. A new study unveils the link between breakfast and obesity in type 2 diabetes. This was the conclusion of a new study now published in the journal Diabetic Medicine. The research was led by Sirimon Reutrakul, who is an associate professor of endocrinology , diabetes , and metabolism in the College of Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Prof. Reutrakul suggests that eating later causes a shift in the biological clock that regulates day-night patterns. Other studies have proposed that this can disrupt energy metabolism. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the vast majority of diabetes cases. It develops when the body does not respond properly to insulin , which is a hormone made in the pancreas. It helps cells to take in and use blood sugar for energy. The pancreas tries to compensate by making more insulin, but eventually, it cannot keep up. This may result in a condition called hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, which can lead to severe health problems. The data on morningness-eveningness patterns came from answers that they gave in a standard questionnaire called Composite Scale of Morningness (CSM). The researchers assessed morningness-eveningness preferences from answers to questions about: preferred waking up and going to bed times, the preferred time of day for taking exercise, and preferred time of day for working, reading, and other mental activities. The CSM yields a score that ranges from 13 for "extreme evening preference" to 55 for "extreme morning preference." The researchers decided that scoring under 45 indicated an evening preference and over 45 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2: Young Patients

Diabetes Type 2: Young Patients

Generation Diabetes: Why the Youngest Type 2 Diabetes Patients Are the Sickest Written by Gillian Mohney on July 18, 2018 In just 30 years, doctors have seen the rise of an entirely new kind of diabetes patient. Gail Punongbayan, 17, was first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at age 14. | Image by Gabriela Hasbun Wearing a maroon sweatshirt with San Leandro Rebels emblazoned on the front, 17-year-old Gail Punongbayan didnt flinch when a physicians assistant drew blood. One, two, three, four, showtime! Jonathan Ramos, a physicians assistant at UCSF Benioff Childrens Hospital, called out as he pricked Gails finger to smear a bright red drop of blood on a small card to check her blood sugar. The high school junior knows the routine. For four years, shes been going to the childrens diabetes clinic at UCSF Benioff Childrens Hospital in Oakland, California, every three months for checkups. At this one, Ramos first checks her height, then her weight and blood sugar. The routine may seem normal, but Gail has a condition that is extremely rare for kids or teens her age. Today, Gail is part of a growing number of kids and teens living with type 2 diabetes. Despite their young age, many of them are experiencing complications and disease progression four times faster than adults with the same condition, setting off alarm bells for the diabetes experts treating them. Stories like Gails are no longer a rare occurrence. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated in 2012 that there were 5,300 new pediatric type 2 cases diagnosed that year in the United States. That number is far lower than the 17,900 kids receiving diagnoses of type 1 diabetes, but its a big increase from essentially zero, which was the case in 1990. The increase mirrors the trend of rising type 2 di Continue reading >>

Rigorous Diet Can Put Type 2 Diabetes Into Remission, Study Finds

Rigorous Diet Can Put Type 2 Diabetes Into Remission, Study Finds

Some people with Type 2 diabetes were able to put the disease in remission without medication by following a rigorous diet plan, according to a study published today in the Lancet medical journal. "Our findings suggest that even if you have had Type 2 diabetes for six years, putting the disease into remission is feasible," Michael Lean, a professor from the University of Glasgow in Scotland who co-led the study, said in a statement. The researchers looked at 149 participants who have had Type 2 diabetes for up to six years and monitored them closely as they underwent a liquid diet that provided only 825 to 853 calories per day for three to five months. The participants were then reintroduced to solid food and maintained a structured diet until the end of the yearlong study. The researchers found that almost half of the participants (68 total) were able to put their diabetes in remission without the use of medication after one year. In addition, those who undertook the study also lost an average of more than 20 pounds. Thirty-two of the 149 participants in the study, however, dropped out of the program. The study comes at a time when more than 100 million American adults are living with diabetes or prediabetes, according to a report released earlier this year by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prediabetes was defined by the CDC as a condition that if not treated often leads to Type 2 diabetes within five years. In addition, approximately 90 to 95 percent of the more than 30 million Americans living with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes, according to the CDC. Roy Taylor, a professor at Newcastle University in the U.K. who co-led the study said in a statement announcing the findings that the impact that diet and lifestyle has on diabetes are "rarely discu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms, Treatment, And More

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms, Treatment, And More

By Barbie Cervoni, RD, CDE | Reviewed by a board-certified physician Type 2 diabetes is a progressive, chronic disease related to your body's challenges with regulating blood sugar. It is often associated with generalized inflammation. Your pancreas produces the hormone insulin to convert sugar (glucose) to energy that you either use immediately or store. With type 2 diabetes, you are unable to use that insulin efficiently. Although your body produces the hormone, either there isn't enough of it to keep up with the amount of glucose in your system, or the insulin being produced isn't being used as well as it should be, both of which result in high blood sugar levels . While this can produce different types of complications, good blood sugar control efforts can help to prevent them. This relies heavily on lifestyle modifications such as weight loss, dietary changes, exercise and, in some cases, medication. But, depending on your age, weight, blood sugar level, and how long you've had diabetes, you may not need a prescription right away. Treatment must be tailored to you and, though finding the perfect combination may take a little time, it can help you live a healthy, normal life with diabetes. Make Way for a New Diabetes Classification System Type 2 diabetes is most common is those who are genetically predisposed and who are overweight, lead a sedentary lifestyle, have high blood pressure, and/or have insulin resistance due to excess weight. People of certain ethnicities are more likely to develop diabetes, too. These include: African Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians, Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, and Asian Americans. These populations are more likely to be overweight and have high blood pressure, which increases the risk of developing diabetes. As Continue reading >>

How Does Weight Loss 'fix' Type 2 Diabetes?

How Does Weight Loss 'fix' Type 2 Diabetes?

How does weight loss 'fix' type 2 diabetes? In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin, which is the hormone that helps regulate blood sugar levels. Until recently, it was believed that diabetes lasts for life, but a new trial suggested that weight loss can send diabetes into remission. Researchers may now have learned why this happens. A new study asks how weight loss can send diabetes into remission, and what happens when it doesn't. A recent clinical trial (the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial [DiRECT]) the results of which were published last year in The Lancet discovered that nearly half of the participants with type 2 diabetes who followed a weight loss program experienced the remission of their condition by the end of the study. Traditionally, specialists thought of diabetes as a condition to be managed rather than cured, so these new findings offer fresh insight into how type 2 diabetes could be counteracted using a tool within anyone's reach: diet and lifestyle choices. Still, after the trial's results were published, a question remained unanswered: "Why would weight loss lead to diabetes remission in some people?" Now, researcher Roy Taylor from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom who oversaw DiRECT, together with colleagues from various academic institutions, claim that they may have found the answer. Their observations were published in the journal Cell Metabolism. For DiRECT, the researchers recruited participants who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within 6 years from the start of the trial. For the study, the volunteers were randomly split into two groups: some were assigned best-practice care, acting as the control group, while others joined an intensive weight management program while still receiving appropriate care Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes News

Type Ii Diabetes News

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. It accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the United States. Most people with type 2 diabetes become insulin resistant, which means the body produces insulin but doesn't use it properly to help transfer glucose, or blood sugar, from the blood into the cells. This causes blood sugar to rise and can lead to a number of complications. Type 2 diabetes was formerly called "adult-onset diabetes" because it typically develops in adulthood. Causes Type 2 diabetes can sometimes be prevented, but not always. Risk factors for the disease include a family history of diabetes, racial or ethnic background, old age, obesity and inactivity, among others. Over time, certain lifestyle factors such as obesity and inactivity can lead to insulin resistance and ultimately to developing type 2 diabetes. Symptoms Sometimes people with type 2 diabetes have few symptoms early on. But some warning signs to look for include unexplained weight loss, extreme hunger or thirst, frequent urination, fatigue, numbness in the hands or feet, dry skin, frequent infections and sores that heal slowly. Anyone who begins to experience any of these symptoms should be checked by a doctor. That's because diabetes can be diagnosed with simple blood tests, but left untreated, it can over time lead to serious and life-threatening complications. These can include eye and foot problems, stroke and heart disease, among others. Treatment People with type 2 diabetes often have to check their blood sugar frequently to make sure it is under control. This is done with a tool called a blood glucose monitor. Healthy eating and regular exercise also play a critical role in managing type 2 diabetes. Also, medications are often necessary to help with re Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fast Facts - Cnn

Diabetes Fast Facts - Cnn

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Here's a look at diabetes, a disease that affects millions of people around the world. Diabetes is characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. The disease can lead to serious complications such as blindness, kidney damage, cardiovascular disease, limb amputations and premature death. There are several types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. Prediabetes occurs when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Before developing Type 2 diabetes, people almost always have prediabetes. Research has shown that some long-term damage to the body may occur during prediabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops when the body's immune system destroys pancreatic beta cells, the only cells in the body that make insulin. This form of diabetes usually strikes children and young adults. Only 5-10% of people with diabetes have Type 1. Risk factors for Type 1 diabetes may be autoimmune, genetic or environmental. There is no known way to prevent Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not use insulin properly. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and in adults, it accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. It is associated with older age, obesity, family history, physical inactivity and race/ethnicity. It is more common in African Americans, Latino Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, although still rare, is being diagnosed more frequently. Gestational diabetes is a form Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Many doctors and patients do not realize that weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes. Instead, there is a widespread belief that the disease is "progressive and incurable," according to a new report published in the BMJ. This is despite there being "consistent evidence" that shedding around 33 pounds (15 kilograms) often produces "total remission" of type 2 diabetes, note Prof. Mike E. J. Lean and other researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom. The thrust of their paper is that greater awareness, when combined with better recording and monitoring of remissions, could result in many more patients no longer having to live with type 2 diabetes and a massive reduction in healthcare costs. The global burden of type 2 diabetes has nearly quadrupled over the past 35 years. In 1980, there were around 108 million people with the disease, and by 2014, this number had risen to 422 million. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is a disease that results when the body becomes less effective at using insulin to help cells to convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy. Excess body weight is a main cause of this type of diabetes. In the United States, an estimated 30.3 million people, or around 9.4 percent of the population, have diabetes - including around 7.2 million who do not realize it. Diabetes accounts for a high portion of the national bill for taking care of the sick. The total direct and indirect cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. In that year, of the $13,700 average medical spend for people with diagnosed diabetes, more than half (around $7,900) was directly attributed to the disease. Treatment 'focuses on drugs' Prof. Lean and colleagues note that the current management guideli Continue reading >>

Researchers Cure Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity In Mice Using Gene Therapy

Researchers Cure Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity In Mice Using Gene Therapy

Researchers cure type 2 diabetes and obesity in mice using gene therapy July 10, 2018, Autonomous University of Barcelona The research team at CBATEG (UAB). Credit: UAB A research team from the UAB led by Professor Fatima Bosch has managed to cure obesity and type 2 diabetes in mice using gene therapy. A single administration of an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) carrying the FGF21 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 21) gene, resulted in genetic manipulation of the liver, adipose tissue or skeletal muscle to continuously produce the FGF21 protein. This protein is a hormone secreted naturally by several organs that acts on many tissues for the maintenance of correct energy metabolism. By inducing FGF21 production through gene therapy the animal lost weight and decreased insulin resistance , which causes the development of type 2 diabetes. The therapy has been tested successfully in two different mouse models of obesity, induced either by diet or genetic mutations. In addition, the authors observed that when administered to healthy mice, the gene therapy promoted healthy ageing and prevented age-associated weight gain and insulin resistance. After treatment with AAV-FGF21, mice lost weight and reduced fat accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue; fat content (steatosis), inflammation and fibrosis of the liver were also reversed; this led to an increase in insulin sensitivity and in healthy ageing, without any adverse side effects. The results have been reproduced after genetic manipulation of three different tissues (liver, adipose tissue or skeletal muscle) to produce the FGF21 protein. "This gives a great flexibility to the therapy, since it allows to select each time the most appropriate tissue, and in case some complication prevents manipulating any of the tissues, Continue reading >>

Speakers Revisit Role Of Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes

Speakers Revisit Role Of Metformin In Type 2 Diabetes

Speakers revisit role of metformin in type 2 diabetes Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles are posted on this topic. Receive an email when new articles are posted on this topic. PHILADELPHIA The role metformin should play as first-line therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease continues to spark debate, a discussion at the Heart in Diabetes Clinical Education Conference indicated. Silvio E. Inzucchi, MD, medical director of the Diabetes Center at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut argued that metformin should remain the first-line treatment in these patients. This position is well-deserved and is based on its efficacy, safety, weight neutrality, likely cardiovascular benefits and low costs. While data regarding SGLT2 and GLP-1 receptor agonists are certainly exciting, most of those patients in those cardiovascular outcome trials were already on metformin at baseline, he said. In admittedly small randomized trials, we do see a consistent benefit on major adverse CV events. Some studies have also shown benefits in two groups of patients previously felt to have contraindications for metformin therapy heart failure and mild-moderate chronic kidney disease, Inzucchi told Endocrine Today. Inzucchi also noted the agents unparalleled popularity in various combination regimens and its consistent appearance in the American Diabetes Association guidelines for more than a decade as foundation therapy to support his claim. He called for studies with the newer agents vs. metformin in such patients to unseat the latter in its position as optimal initial glucose-lowering therapy. Vivian Fonesca, MD, FRCP, endocrinology section chief at Tulane University of Health Sciences in New Orleans, argued against metformins status Continue reading >>

Drugmaker Discontinuing Type 2 Diabetes Medication

Drugmaker Discontinuing Type 2 Diabetes Medication

MHS Home > News > Articles > Drugmaker discontinuing Type 2 diabetes medication Drugmaker discontinuing Type 2 diabetes medication Approximately 6,200 Military Health System beneficiaries who are using Tanzeum to aid with managing their Type 2 diabetes will need to switch to an alternative in the wake of GlaxoSmithKline PLCs announcement that it will stop manufacturing the drug starting in late July. Beneficiaries are advised to speak with their provider about the preferred alternative medications and which is best for them. (MHS graphic) FALLS CHURCH, Va. Approximately 6,200 Military Health System beneficiaries who are using a pen-injection prescription medication called Tanzeum to aid with managing their Type 2 diabetes will need to switch to an alternative in the wake of GlaxoSmithKline PLCs announcement that it will stop manufacturing the drug starting in late July. Tanzeum will continue to be available until the current supply runs out, said U.S. Public Health Service Lt. Cmdr. Teisha Robertson, pharmacist in the Pharmacy Operations Division at the Defense Health Agency. However, beneficiaries who continue filling prescriptions for the drug after July 24 will be charged a higher copay. Beneficiaries are advised to speak with their provider about the preferred alternative medications and which is best for them, Robertson said. The brand-name preferred alternatives are Bydureon or Bydureon BCise, manufactured by Astra Zeneca; and Trulicity, by Lilly. Trulicity is a pen-injection medication; Bydureon is vial or pen; and Bydureon BCise is an auto-injector. The copay is the same no matter which of these alternatives is chosen, Robertson said. Tanzeum prescriptions can be transferred to a brand-name alternative without the provider submitting a new prior authorization, Continue reading >>

Recent Articles | Type 2 Diabetes, Microbiology | The Scientist Magazine

Recent Articles | Type 2 Diabetes, Microbiology | The Scientist Magazine

The genetically engineered probiotic, already in clinical trials, may ease patients strict dietary regimes. Climate change may open up new habitats suitable for the viruss spread. A new study reports finding corn species in Mexico that can trap nitrogen. Researchers study the mechanistic effects of behavioral changes caused by parasites in fruit flies. Bacterial Genetics Could Help Researchers Block Interplanetary Contamination Identifying microbes from Earth that can survive on spacecraft may help scientists eliminate them from future space missions and from searches for extraterrestrial life. Scientists Cant Agree on Whats Making Pistachio Trees Sick A new study ignites debate on the cause of pistachio bushy top syndrome, a disease that has crippled farms in California, Arizona, and New Mexico. Radar data indicate that the Red Planets southern polar ice sheets cover a 20-kilometer-wide body of water. Oldest Evidence of Terrestrial Life on a Young Earth Microbes were living on land as early as 3.22 billion years ago, fossilized rocks show, 500 million years earlier than previously documented. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes