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Type 2 Diabetes: All Is Well With The Toenails

Type 2 Diabetes: All Is Well With The Toenails

We all know that diabetes wreaks havoc on our bodies from our head to toe. Yet it is often our toes, the toenails in particular, that show the tale-tale sign of being a diabetic. Symptoms can include brittle, cracked, thickened, or discolored toenails. I am sure that doctors and diabetic counselors would be quick to tell you not to go barefoot and to take care of our feet but toenail care isn’t often mentioned. All is well so far with my toenails but I know of several people who go to the doctor on a regular schedule to have their toenails trimmed. From what I understand, an accidental cut on the toe can spell disaster for a diabetic as infection can set in and lead to more serious problems. I’ve seen the pictures and have heard the stories of diabetics having to have toes amputated due to complications from diabetes. Only time will tell, but the threat of amputation or a fungal infection of the toenails is all the reason I need to ensure that I take care of my feet and keep my glucose levels in check. I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or “you have diabetes” can sound like a death sentence and while we … Dear Nadia, Is marijuana used to lower high blood sugar? if so, does this mean I have to refrain from the munchies to get the benefits? Leah Dear Leah: The new Marijuana industry is still at its infancy in terms … Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yellow Nails: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes And Yellow Nails: Is There A Connection?

Why do nails turn yellow? Whether they’re short or long, thick or thin, your nails can reveal a lot of secrets about your health. Changes to the texture, thickness, or color can signal that you’re sick before other symptoms appear. When you have a chronic disease such as diabetes, it’s even more important to pay attention to the health of your nails. Changes in nail color and thickness could warn of a more serious health problem. If your nails have turned yellow and you haven’t painted them that color or injured them, most often it’s because you’ve picked up an infection. Usually the culprit is a fungus. In rare cases, the color change can stem from a condition called yellow nail syndrome. People with this disorder also have lymphedema, or swelling in their body. Yellow nail syndrome also causes fluid in the lungs. Other possible reasons why your nails can turn yellow include: bronchiectasis, or damaged airways overusing nail polish without giving your nails a break certain medications, such as quinacrine (Atabrine) carotenoids, especially beta carotene In some people with diabetes, the nails take on a yellowish hue. Often this coloring has to do with the breakdown of sugar and its effect on the collagen in nails. This kind of yellowing isn’t harmful. It doesn’t need to be treated. But in certain cases, yellowing can be a sign of a nail infection. People with diabetes are more likely than those without diabetes to get a fungal infection called onychomycosis. This infection usually affects the toenails. The nails will turn yellow and become brittle. The thickening that comes along with yellow nails can make it harder and more painful for you to walk. Thickened nails are also sharper than usual. They can dig into the skin of your foot. If you do get a cut Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? Take That Toenail Fungus Seriously

Have Diabetes? Take That Toenail Fungus Seriously

Before I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, toenail fungus was a problem, but I did not take it seriously because over-the-counter remedies seemed to work just fine. However, after having diabetes for a while I began to notice yellowing and thickening in the big toenails that spread to some of the other toes, too. Was Type 2 diabetes doing this to me? As always, I did some research. The fact is that a lot of people develop toenail fungus, or onychomycosis, but it is about twice as common in people with diabetes. Diabetic nerve damage in the feet, which may prevent a person from noticing damage to his toenails, and reduced circulation, which affects healing, are both partly responsible for this increased risk. You probably already know how important it is to inspect your feet every day, looking for red spots, blisters, sores, or other types of irritation. These can become life threatening if they are left alone for very long. The threat of lower-leg amputation hangs over us, and about 60% of these procedures occur in people with diabetes. There are fewer of these procedures now because of better diabetes care and education, but amputations are still performed when foot and leg sores do not heal. What I did not know was that toenail fungus can lead to an increased risk for amputation. That means those benign-looking ugly toenails can no longer be covered up and ignored. The first step to taking good care of your feet is going to a podiatrist, or foot doctor, regularly. You should visit him at least once a year for a foot checkup. This specialist will watch for signs of toenail fungus and inform you of the best ways to treat it. Because you have diabetes, the treatment for toenail fungus will be a little different, and perhaps more aggressive, too. I tried to avoid those Continue reading >>

What Do Your Fingernails Say About You? Can They Indicate That You Have Diabetes?

What Do Your Fingernails Say About You? Can They Indicate That You Have Diabetes?

What Do Your Fingernails Say About You? Can They Indicate That You Have Diabetes? We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. What Do Your Fingernails Say About You? Can They Indicate That You Have Diabetes? David C. Klonoff, MD, FACP, FRCP (Edin), Fellow AIMBE Diabetes is currently diagnosed by way of blood testing either with elevated glucose levels or elevated A1C levels. 1 Both tests are invasive which makes them inconvenient for many patients. Glucose testing may be subject to preanalytical or analytical errors in measurement. A1C testing may be affected by physiologic perturbations in red blood cell lifespan or by the presence of hemoglobinopathies, which can alter the apparent concentration of A1C so that it does not correspond to mean glycemic levels. A noninvasive diagnostic test for diabetes would be well received at many screening clinics. Such a noninvasive marker would be particularly useful if it could also serve as a marked of diabetic glycation-associated end organ damage. In 1989 a team from Japan compared the degrees of nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins in the skin nails, hair, and hemoglobin of 51 subjects with diabetes and 20 controls subjects without diabetes. 2 Furosine is an intermediate of nonenzymatic glycation of free amino groups in proteins, a process known as advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation. 3 In this study, A1C levels correlated more closely to the furosine levels in nails (r Continue reading >>

Nail Removal For Nail Fungus?

Nail Removal For Nail Fungus?

What can be done about nail fungus with a diabetic? I am 36. I've been a diabetic for over 12 years (Type 2). My left foot has always been prone to athlete's foot and now my nails are turning black. The nail on my left big toe is totally blackened. I've cut the nail down to the cuticle. Is this safe? My doctor said, "Get rid of the nail, get rid of the fungus." So, I got rid of the nail (most of it). What advice can you offer? Should I have the entire nail removed? – Yolanda, Florida It seems that you and your doctor have taken the surgeon's approach to toenail infection! Before we get to cutting or removing the nails, let me point out a few general facts. Individuals who suffer from diabetes are susceptible to toenail fungal infections and their complications. It is very important to treat the infection and achieve good glucose control. (This is not just a cosmetic problem for individuals who have diabetes.) Treatment depends on the stage of the infection and other factors. If there is only a white patch on the nail, an antifungal lacquer application will cure the infection. If there is nail thickening, brittleness, separation and inflammation, an oral (pill) antifungal agent can be effective as a single therapy or in combination with an antifungal lacquer. The usual discoloration of the toenail is a yellowish brown hue. If there are other organisms causing the change in the toenail, the discoloration may take on a dark green to black appearance. Black toenail can also be caused by trauma, autoimmune disorders, and melanoma. So it is important to arrive at the right diagnosis before treatment. This can be done by a biopsy and culture of the toenail. Removing the toenail completely is not recommended for individuals who have diabetes, since the risk of complications d Continue reading >>

9 Pedicure Safety Tips For People With Diabetes

9 Pedicure Safety Tips For People With Diabetes

9 Pedicure Safety Tips for People With Diabetes Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . By Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD, Special to Everyday Health Summertime is beach and sandal weather, whichmeans your feet and toes are more frequently on display. Professional pedicures can help your toes look their best and pamper your feet, but too often poor sanitation practices, shared tools, and the work of overzealous nail technicians can result in skin injuries or infections . Pedicure problems can happen to anyone, but if you have type 2diabetes , you need to be especially careful about protecting your feet . An infection can raise your blood sugar levels, which, in turn, can interfere with proper healing and increase your risk of serious complications likeulcers or even amputation. Before you schedule a pedicure, check with your physician to make sure its okay to have one. Once you getthe green light, do your feet a favor and learn what to look for and what to avoid at nail salons. Taking a few basic precautions can significantly reduce infection risks and lead to a safer, more pleasant experience. Know when to postpone a pedicure. If you currently have any infections, cuts, or open sores on your legs, feet, or toenails, skip the salon since these will make you even more vulnerable to problems. Instead, contact your physician for a referral to a podiatrist or other professional who is medically trained to care for feet. Avoid shaving your legs for a day or two before your pedicure. Shaving can leave tiny nicks in your skin (even if you cant see them) and increase the chance of infection. Its fine to shave afterward. Stick with a salon that is clean and practices impeccable sanitation. Tell the manager you have diabete Continue reading >>

Nails In Diabetes - Practical Diabetespractical Diabetes

Nails In Diabetes - Practical Diabetespractical Diabetes

Rowan Hillson September 1, 2017 Vol 34.7 September 2017 We all have our hobbies. Dr William B Bean studied his fingernails for at least 35 years.1 A little unusual perhaps, but our nails have much to teach us. Nails are made of keratin and grow lifelong. The nail plates protect the nail bed. The nail matrix the living tissue which produces the nails is visible as the lunula, the white crescent at the base of the nail. Fingernails grow about 3mm/month or 0.1mm/day; toenails about 1mm/month. Keratin is a strong protein that forms an extensively folded mesh linked by very stable disulphide bonds. It is hard and resistant to injury. There are skin folds at both sides of the nail plate, and at the base where the fold extends into the dead skin cells of the cuticle.2 This infection of the nail fold can be acute or chronic. In the latter, damage to the cuticle may result in distortion of underlying nail tissues causing spaces that can readily be infected. Infecting organisms include Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (which may turn the nail blue-black), as well as yeasts or fungi such as Candida albicans or Candida parapsilosis.3 Over-zealous manicuring may cause injury and a portal for infection, especially in neuropathic fingers. Nail infections with yeasts or fungi are common among people with diabetes usually affecting toenails.4 White/yellow/greenish discolouration and thickening at the end of the nail spreads gradually to involve the whole nail which may be thick and brittle. The distorted nail can become sharp or break off, and can dig into neighbouring toes. Onychomycosis is a significant predictor of diabetic foot ulcer; hazard ratio 1.58 (1.162.16).5 Treatment is lengthy and challenging. Seek early signs to allow p Continue reading >>

Nail Abnormalities: Symptoms, Causes, And Prevention

Nail Abnormalities: Symptoms, Causes, And Prevention

Healthy nails appear smooth and have consistent coloring. As you age, you may develop vertical ridges, or your nails may be a bit more brittle. This is harmless. Spots due to injury should grow out with the nail. Abnormalities such as spots, discoloration, and nail separation can result from injuries to the fingers and hands, viral warts ( periungual warts ), infections ( onychomycosis ), and some medications, such as those used for chemotherapy . Certain medical conditions can also change the appearance of your fingernails. However, these changes can be difficult to interpret. Your fingernails appearance alone isnt enough to diagnose a specific illness. A doctor will use this information, along with your other symptoms and a physical exam, to make a diagnosis. You should always consult your doctor if you have any questions about changes in your nails. Some changes in your nails are due to medical conditions that need attention. See your doctor if you have any of these symptoms: discoloration (dark streaks, white streaks, or changes in nail color) changes in nail shape (curling or clubbing) changes in nail thickness (thickening or thinning) These are just some of the signs of abnormal fingernails. Having any of these signs isnt proof of any medical condition. Youll need to visit your doctor to determine if your condition is serious. In many cases, proper care of your nails is enough to correct their appearance. You can prevent many nail abnormalities by taking good care of your nails. Follow these general guidelines to keep your nails healthy: Dont bite or tear at your nails, or pull on hangnails. Always use nails clippers and trim them after you bathe, when nails are still soft. Using sharp manicure scissors, trim your nails straight across, rounding the tips gently. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foot Care

Diabetes Foot Care

You're more likely to have foot problems with diabetes because it can damage your nerves and lessen blood flow to your feet. The American Diabetes Association estimates that it's the reason why 1 in 5 people with diabetes who seek hospital care do so. You have to take care of your feet when you have diabetes. Poor foot care may lead to amputation of a foot or leg. Your doctor will check yours each year for problems. If you take good care of your feet, you can prevent most serious problems related to diabetes. Use mild soaps and warm water. Pat your skin dry; do not rub. Thoroughly dry your feet. After washing, put lotion on them to prevent cracking. But not between your toes! Look carefully at the tops and bottoms of your feet. Have someone else do it if you can't see them. Check for dry, cracked skin. Look for blisters, cuts, scratches, or other sores. Check for redness, increased warmth, or tenderness when you touch an area. Watch for ingrown toenails, corns, and calluses. If you get a blister or sore from your shoes, don't "pop" it. Put a bandage over it, and wear a different pair of shoes. Cut toenails after bathing, when they are soft. Trim them straight across, then smooth with a nail file. Avoid cutting into the corners of toes. You may want a podiatrist (foot doctor) to do it for you. Don't cut cuticles. Walk and work out in comfortable shoes. Don't exercise when you have open sores on your feet. Continue reading >>

Nailing Down Nail Infections

Nailing Down Nail Infections

The condition of your nails may point directly toward the condition of your health. If you are in good health, your fingernails and toenails tend to be smooth, somewhat curved and slightly pink. Abnormalities in the color, shape or condition of your nails, however, may indicate medical problems of varying severity. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation recently commissioned a survey of 1,017 adults, conducted by Roper Starch Audits and Surveys Worldwide. The survey revealed that only 48 percent of Americans know that unexpected physical changes in their nails can signal a significant medical problem including infection, anemia andin extreme circumstanceseven cancer or kidney problems. Furthermore, of those who noticed unexpected changes in the appearance of their nails, a mere 40 percent had them examined by a physician. The fungal infection known as onychomycosis is the most common nail infection, accounting for approximately 50 percent of all nail problems. Onychomycosis results in thick, brittle nails that can be sharp and pointed, causing injury to the surrounding skin. An estimated 30 million individuals in the United States suffer from onychomycosis. According to the November 2000 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, onychomycosis is also the most common nail disorder among people with diabetes, representing about 30 percent of cutaneous fungal infections. One study published in the October 1998 issue of the British Journal of Dermatology, involving 550 people with diabetes, found that 26 percent of patients had onychomycosis and 46 percent had abnormalities in their nails. Individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who have sensory neuropathy and impaired circulation of the lower extremities are at additional risk for onychomycosis. A pers Continue reading >>

Finger Nails Can Be Diabetes Tell Tale Sign

Finger Nails Can Be Diabetes Tell Tale Sign

Finger Nails Can Be Diabetes Tell Tale Sign It's difficult enough diagnosing illnesses. Nonetheless the nails are a tell tale sign reflecting a range of health problems. They are a trigger for diagnosis of skin ailments right through to chronic diseases. They say the eyes are the windows to your soul. Well then one's nails must be the windows to one's health. Dr. Elizabeth Salada ensures that she checks her patients' nails on a routine basis as part of the patient's routine medical examinations. "Lots of common diseases can present themselves through the appearance of your nails." The normal, typical healthy nail is quite pink, flat and even in colour. "You always want to be aware of any changes of shape in the nail, thickness, consistency looking at the surface the color of the nail, whether the nail is separated for the nail bed." If the nails are half-white and half-pink this could indicate kidney problems. "If you see nail pits that could indicate the patient has psoriasis one of the skin disorders." A slight blush at bottom of the nail is sometimes a symptom of diabetes. A red nail bed could mean you have heart disease. "Liver disease can cause nail changes in the way your nails are shaped." So please remember that nails cannot paint the entire picture, but a few strokes of the brush. Continue reading >>

Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Black Toenail Fungus

Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Black Toenail Fungus

Many people with Type 2 diabetes have problems with their feet. This is due to poor circulation and nerve damage. Perhaps you’ve started getting pins and needles in the feet? The hardening and darkening of the toenails are common, and sometimes the blackening of toenails can be a sign that you have developed a fungal infection. When a fungus reaches the stage where it turns a toenail a dark or black color, it becomes a problem. This can result in it spreading to other nails, or even cause other medical problems if it’s not treated quickly. But is the link between Type 2 diabetes and black toenail fungus nothing more than a coincidence? If you have diabetes and have experienced foot issues (including athlete’s foot), paying attention to the warning signs of toenail fungus is critically important. Taking care of your feet should be one of your highest priorities. The feet are where many warning signs originate. So, if you pay close enough attention to the health of your feet and toes, you’ll be doing yourself a huge favor in the long run. Is Toenail Fungus a Sign of Diabetes? Black toenail fungus and diabetes can sometimes go hand-in-hand. But, does that mean toenail fungus is a symptom of diabetes? Unfortunately, there’s no clear way to answer this question. Toenail fungus could be an early symptom of diabetes. But, with so many potential causes, this question requires further investigation. How Toenail Fungus is Contracted Toenail fungus is caused by trapped moisture underneath the nail bed, creating a breeding ground for fungi to grow. Perhaps you went barefoot in a public shower, or maybe you were getting a pedicure, and the pedicurist accidentally poked the nail bed with an infected tool. You may not even know where, or how, you got an infection. But, you d Continue reading >>

Fingernails Splitting | Diabetic Connect

Fingernails Splitting | Diabetic Connect

Started2011-07-31 13:35:39 -0500 11 Likes I have vertical ridges on many of my fingernails which causes them to split snd catch. It hurts and it's unsightly. Anyone have an effective solution? I know I should wear gloves to keep my hands away from the water. I don't use nail polish or get manicures. It appears that my diabetes and thyroid conditions could be causing thishave any of you taken supplements or changed your diet to cope with this? After nearly 2 months on 5000 mcg of biotin per day, I have noticed that my fingernails are harder and the splits, while still there, are not as prevalent or severe. Thanks to all of you who suggested remedies and for the biotin suggestion in particular. There is a product that I was told about by my podia. It is called No Miss it comes in a glass bottle and has a dropper with it. I was told to use it once a day so I did that every morning for 6 months and all of my ridges went away and my nails even grew and got stronger. It is a fungal medicine but it work and I did not have any fungal issues when doc told meto use it. The original bottle got from a Nail place in the mall and then I went on line and ordered it. they have different sizes of bottles you can buy as well. It is a lot cheaper ordering it from the web site than getting it at the nail places. I too have diabetes and thyroid conditions. My doctor told me that the ridges on my nails was caused from all of the medications that I have to take for these conditions, as well as some other physical challenges. I try to keep clear nail polish on my nails to help keep them more protected. If I don't use the polish, then I have splits in the quicks near the cuticles at the top of the nail. This helps me. I take supplements along with the medications. These are to help with other Continue reading >>

The Truth About Pedicures

The Truth About Pedicures

It's summer: a chance to show off those pretty toenails. Here's what you need to know before you go to the salon Continue reading >>

[nail Susceptibility To Fungal Infection In Patients With Type 1 And 2 Diabetes Under Long Term Poor Glycaemia Control].

[nail Susceptibility To Fungal Infection In Patients With Type 1 And 2 Diabetes Under Long Term Poor Glycaemia Control].

Abstract Onychomycosis is a common disorder in adults. Its prevalence increases also in diabetics. The objective of the study was: 1) evaluation of finger and toe nail susceptibility to Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes with long term glycaemia under poor control as compared with healthy persons, and 2) checking whether or not various aetiology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes may influence the intensity of fungal nail infection. The materials comprised finger and toe nails sampled from 26 patients with type 1 diabetes (20 females and 6 males at average age 51 +/- 10 years), 25 patients with type 2 diabetes (17 females and 8 males at average age 58 +/- 4 years). Twenty two healthy volunteers (18 females and 4 males at average age 47 +/- 14 years) served as controls. All of the diabetics (except one with type 1 diabetes and four with type 2 diabetes) had increased fasting glycaemia; moreover, all of them had poor controlled long term glycaemia because the concentration of glycated haemoglobin HbAlc exceeded 7.5%. The patients with type 1 diabetes were treated with insulin while those with type 2 diabetes with diet only (one person), with gliclazide (sixteen persons), with glimepirid (five persons), and with metformin (four persons). Enhanced fingernail susceptibility to Candida albicans infection was detected in 38.5% of the patients with type 1 diabetes, in 28% of those with type 2 diabetes, and in 22.7% of the controls. Intensive toenail infection was found in 34.6%, 20%, and 22.7% respectively. Enhanced fingernail susceptibility to Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection was found in 30.8% of the patients with type 1 diabetes, in 48% of those with type 2 diabetes, and in 4.54% of the controls while intens Continue reading >>

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