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Type 2 Diabetes Medications List

Type 2 Diabetes - Understanding Medication - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Understanding Medication - Nhs.uk

Most people need medicine to control their type 2 diabetes. Medicine helps keep your blood sugar level as normal as possible to prevent health problems. You'll have to take it for the rest of your life. Diabetes usually gets worse over time, so your medicine or dose may need to change. Adjusting your diet and being active is also necessary to keep your blood sugar level down. Diabetes medicines help lower the amount of sugar in your blood. There are many types of medicine for type 2 diabetes. It can take time to find a medicine and dose that's right for you. You'll usually be offered a medicine called metformin first. If your blood sugar levels aren't lower within 3 months, you may need another medicine. Over time, you may need a combination of medicines. Your GP or diabetes nurse will recommend the medicines most suitable for you. Insulin isn't often used for type 2 diabetes in the early years. It's only needed when other medicines no longer work. Diabetes UK has more information about taking medicines for type 2 diabetes . Your GP or diabetes nurse will explain how to take your medicine and how to store it. If you need to inject insulin or medicine called gliptins, they'll show you how. Your diabetes medicine may cause side effects. These can include: If you feel unwell after taking medicine or notice any side effects, speak to your GP or diabetes nurse. Don't stop taking medication without getting advice. How to get free prescriptions for diabetes medication You're entitled to free prescriptions for your diabetes medication. To claim your free prescriptions, you'll need to apply for an exemption certificate. To do this: you should get the certificate in the post about a week later it will last for 5 years take it to your pharmacy with your prescriptions Save your re Continue reading >>

Glp-1 Agonist Medications Chart

Glp-1 Agonist Medications Chart

This chart outlines the latest medications approved by the FDA for diabetes treatment and the differences and similarities between them. Print out this chart and post in your office as a handy reference for your staff and patients alike…. To download this in PDF format, just use this link: GLP-1 Agonist Medications Chart Byetta (exenatide) AZ – Bydureon Pen and Kit (exenatide extended release) AZ – Tanzeum (albiglutide) GSK – Trulicity (dulaglutide) LILLY – Victoza (liraglutide) NOVO – Note: We will periodically update this chart but if you notice any errors, please contact us at [email protected] Thank you. See more GLP-1 Agonist Resources Continue reading >>

How Doctors Choose Medications To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

How Doctors Choose Medications To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

A national survey of specialists and academic generalists Abstract OBJECTIVE—Glycemic control remains suboptimal despite the wide range of available medications. More effective medication prescription might result in better control. However, the process by which physicians choose glucose-lowering medicines is poorly understood. We sought to study the means by which physicians choose medications for type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We surveyed 886 physician members of either the Society of General Internal Medicine (academic generalists, response rate 30%) or the American Diabetes Association (specialists, response rate 23%) currently managing patients with type 2 diabetes. Respondents weighed the importance of 15 patient, physician, and nonclinical factors when deciding which medications to prescribe for type 2 diabetic subjects at each of three management stages (initiation, use of second-line oral agents, and insulin). RESULTS—Respondents reported using a median of five major considerations (interquartile range 4–6) at each stage. Frequently cited major considerations included overall assessment of the patient's health/comorbidity, A1C level, and patient's adherence behavior but not expert guidelines/hospital algorithms or patient age. For insulin initiation, academic generalists placed greater emphasis on patient adherence (76 vs. 60% of specialists, P < 0.001). These generalists also identified patient fear of injections (68%) and patient desire to prolong noninsulin therapy (68%) as major insulin barriers. Overall, qualitative factors (e.g., adherence, motivation, overall health assessment) were somewhat more highly considered than quantitative factors (e.g., A1C, age, weight) with mean aggregate scores of 7.3 vs. 6.9 on a scale of 0– Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs

Diabetes Drugs

Tweet There are a number of different types of diabetes drugs - with some having similar ways of acting. Drugs which act similarly to each other are put into the same class of drugs. Below is a list of the most common diabetes drug classes, an A-Z of all diabetes drugs, how they work, who they are for and which medications fall into these drug classes. Jump to the treatment you’re interested in: Biguanides / Metformin Sulphonylureas Meglitinides / Prandial glucose regulator / Glinides Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors Thiazolidinedione / Glitazones DPP-4 inhibitors / Gliptins Incretin mimetics / GLP-1 analogues Amylin analogues A to Z of diabetes drugs Insulin Insulin is a hormone which helps to regulate blood sugar. A number of different types of insulin are available as medication, with some insulins acting for as long as a day and others acting for only a few hours. However, insulin is prescribed for people with type 1 diabetes and for people with type 2 diabetes who have not responded so well on oral medication (tablets). Read more on insulin Biguanides / Metformin The only available diabetes medication in the biguanides class of drugs is metformin. Biguanides prevent the liver from producing glucose and helps to improve the body’s sensitivity towards insulin. Metformin is commonly used as a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes and may occasionally be prescribed, in combination with insulin, for people with type 1 diabetes. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications

Diabetes Medications

The main aim of treatment for diabetes is to reduce your risk of developing complications by keeping your blood glucose (sugar) levels at reasonable levels. If your doctor gives you tablets for diabetes, make sure you understand the right time to take them and any special instructions about timing around meals. For these medications to work correctly, it is important to take them as prescribed. Ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are unsure. Medicines for type 2 diabetes There are various medicines that are used to treat type 2 diabetes, such as: Metformin Sulphonylureas (example, gliclazide, glipizide, glibenclamide) Acarbose Pioglitazone Insulin Metformin Metformin works by improving your body's response to the insulin you naturally make. It also reduces the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. Metformin is prescribed in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood glucose levels cannot be lowered with diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes. Sulphonylureas Sulphonylureas work by making your pancreas produce more insulin. They are prescribed in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood glucose levels cannot be lowered with metformin. There are several tablets in this group. They include: Gliclazide also known as Glizon or Apo-Gliclazide Glipizide also known as Minidiab Glibenclamide also known as Gliben or Apo-Glibenclamide Pioglitazone This is an insulin sensitiser which helps reduce insulin resistance in your body. Pioglitazone is prescribed in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood glucose levels cannot be lowered with metformin and sulphonylureas. Acarbose Acarbose reduces the rise in blood glucose levels after a meal by delaying the breakdown and absorption of carbohydrates in the stomach. Acarbose is prescribed in p Continue reading >>

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Understanding Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes occurs when your body no longer makes or uses insulin as it’s intended to. Insulin is a naturally occurring substance in the body, but some people don’t make enough of it or their cells become insulin resistant. Diabetic patients must manage higher than normal blood sugar (or glucose) levels in the body. Diabetes is classified into two types (Type 1 and Type 2). Diabetics of both types require medicines to normalize blood glucose levels. If the doctor says you’re diabetic, he or she will prescribe drugs for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It’s good to know about the universe of treatment options diabetics have today. Here’s a comprehensive list of available diabetes medications along with links to Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes medication prices that will help you save up to 90% off U.S. retail prices. You may also find our Cheat Sheet helpful: 12 Ways to Save Money on Your Diabetes Medications [Cheat Sheet] Type 1 Diabetes Medications Short-Action Insulin Brand names: Novolin and Humulin (regular insulin) are two commonly prescribed, short-acting drugs your doctor may prescribe. Rapid-Action Insulin Brand names: Levemir FlexPen and NovoLog Flexpen are two commonly prescribed rapid action insulins. Brand name: Humalog Pen (insulin lispro) Brand name: Apidra (insulin glulisine) Intermediate-Action Insulin Brand name: Novolin N and Humulin N Pen (insulin isophane) are two intermediate-action insulins your doctor may prescribe. Long-Action Insulin Brand name Tresiba (insulin degludec) Brand name Levemir Flexpen (insulin detemir) Brand name Lantus Vials (insulin glargine) Brand name Toujeo (insulin glargine) Combination Medications Insulin Brand name: Ryzodeg Brand name: NovoLog Mix 70/30 Brand name: Novolin 70/30 Brand na Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetic Medication List And Guide

Type 2 Diabetic Medication List And Guide

While there are way too many type 2 diabetes medications to list in a single article, I will briefly describe some of the most common ones as well as their generic names and brand names in parenthesis. What you’ll find is that the generic terms within the same category of medications often have similar roots, which makes it easier to remember some of them. Sometimes insurance companies won’t cover the particular medication you’d like, but will cover another medication in that same class that may work very similarly. Sulfonylureas What are they called? The most commonly used sulfonylureas used today are: Glipizide (Glucotrol), Glyburide (Micronase, Glynase, Diabeta), and Glimepiride (Amaryl). How do they work? Sulfonylureas are some of the oldest diabetic medications. They work by stimulating the beta-cells in the pancreas to produce more insulin. They are taken 1-2 times daily with meals and work to lower blood sugar independently of food intake. For example, they will lower blood glucose regardless of the meal eaten or if a meal is skipped, which makes them more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Both fasting and post-meal blood glucose are targeted in these meds and the average A1c reduction with the addition of sulfonylureas is 1.5-2%. Advantages The main advantage of sulfonylureas is that they are very inexpensive, taken orally, covered by nearly all (if not all) insurance companies. Disadvantages Sulfonylureas can cause weight gain and hypoglycemia. Additionally, they may be linked with ischemic preconditioning, which may lead to heart disease or cardiac events over time. And they generally stop working effectively over time. Biguanides What are they called? There is only one medication in this class and that is glucophage (Metformin). How do they work? Glucophage Continue reading >>

25 Diabetes Drugs In The Pipeline Right Now

25 Diabetes Drugs In The Pipeline Right Now

Meet the new weapons in the war against the chronic metabolic disease. If diabetes were a stock, it'd be booming: the CDC says that the number of people with diagnosed diabetes has increased by 373% over the past 30 years, from 5.6 million in 1980 to 20.9 million in 2011. What new medicines are coming out to help turn diabetes' boom into a bust? You've seen GEN's list of 15 breast cancer drugs that are currently in the pipeline; now, GEN has compiled a list of 25 drug candidates for which diabetes is at least one proposed or approved indication, and for which one indication has reached Phase III or Registration phases. Each entry includes the name of the drug candidate, the sponsor, and, where applicable, collaboration partners; method of action; indication (by market, where applicable); and phase of trial. Some products are still in clinical trial phases for new indications or formulations after winning marketing approval for initial indications; these approvals, where applicable, are listed on the bottom of each entry. Sponsor/Developer: GlaxoSmithKline; developed by Human Genome Sciences, which licensed the drug for late-stage trials before Glaxo acquired HGS in a $3 billion deal completed Aug. 3 Mechanism of action: Glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 1 agonist Indication (Phase): Once-weekly for type 2 diabetes (Phase III completed; NDA expected to be filed early 2013) Sponsor/Developer: Takeda Pharmaceuticals and Furiex Pharmaceuticals Mechanism of action: DPP-4 inhibitor Indication (Phase): U.S.—Oral treatment of type 2 diabetes, individually and as a fixed-dose combination (FDC) with the thiazolidinedione pioglitazone (Registration; NDA re-submitted July 2012 after initial NDA rejected via complete response letter April 2012) EU—Oral treatment of type 2 diabetes (Re Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

What Oral Medications Are Available for Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes results when the body is unable to produce the amount of insulin it needs to convert food into energy or when it is unable to use insulin appropriately. Sometimes the body is actually producing more insulin than is needed by a person to keep blood glucose in a normal range. Yet blood glucose remains high, because the body's cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. Physicians and scientists believe that type 2 diabetes is caused by many factors, including insufficient insulin and insulin resistance. They increasingly believe that the relative contribution each factor makes toward causing diabetes varies from person to person. It is important to know the name of your diabetes medicine (or medicines), how it is taken, the reasons for taking it and possible side-effects. Diabetes Pills How to Take How They Work Side Effects Of Note Biguanides Metformin (Glucophage) Metformin liquid ( Riomet) Metformin extended release (Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Glumetza) Metformin: usually taken twice a day with breakfast and evening meal. Metformin extended release: usually taken once a day in the morning. Decreases amount of glucose released from liver. Bloating, gas, diarrhea, upset stomach, loss of appetite (usually within the first few weeks of starting). Take with food to minimize symptoms. Metformin is not likely to cause low blood glucose. In rare cases, lactic acidosis may occur in people with abnormal kidney or liver function. Always tell healthcare providers that it may need to be stopped when you are having a dye study or surgical procedure. Sulfonylureas Glimepiride (Amaryl) Glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase) Glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Micronized glyburide (Glynase) Take with a meal once or twice Continue reading >>

List Of Diabetic Medication

List Of Diabetic Medication

Tweet Save The three primary types of diabetic medication include oral diabetes medication, insulin, and other types of injectable diabetes medicine. Within these broad groups, diabetic medication can be classified more specifically as belonging to certain classes. The following article provides a list of diabetic medication broken down by type and class of medicine. There are three basic types of diabetic medication: Insulin Other injectable diabetes medicine (besides insulin). The list of diabetic medication provided below is separated first by the categories explained above, then by the class of medicine to which a particular medication belongs. List of Oral Diabetic Medication Oral diabetes medications are used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Medicines within this category fall within one of several classes, including: Biguanides Meglitinides Sulfonylureas Alpha glucosidase inhibitors Dipeptidyl peptidase inhibitors Ergot alkaloids Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2 inhibitors) Bile acid sequestrants Combination medications. Biguanides Meglitinides Meglitinides include: Sulfonylureas Specific types of these diabetic medications include: Thiazolidinediones (Glitazones) Alpha Glucosidase Inhibitors Dipeptidyl Peptidase Inhibitors Ergot Alkaloids Only one ergot alkaloid is approved for treating type 2 diabetes -- bromocriptine (Cycloset®). Only the Cycloset brand of bromocriptine is approved for this use (other forms are approved for different uses). Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibitors SGLT2 inhibitors work by causing glucose to be lost from the bloodstream into the urine. There are three approved medications in this class: Invokana® (canagliflozin), Farxiga™ (dapagliflozin), and empagliflozin (Jardiance®). These medications tend to lowe Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes Medication

Free Diabetes Medication

30-day supply of generic Diabetes medication Since 2009 ShopRite pharmacies have dispensed nearly 5 million Free diabetes prescriptions! Some of the medications that we offer are: Metformin Glimepiride Glipizide Glipizide XL Glyburide Glimepiride A diabetes diagnosis can spur many questions. Different types of diabetes call for different medications and treatment. We are here to help alleviate your concerns and guide you along the best path for proper treatment and management. Speak to your ShopRite pharmacist today to inquire about our free diabetes medications and a Free Blood Glucose Monitor. Our Pharmacists are happy to answer any questions or concerns you may have. *All diabetes medications require a valid prescription. Quantity limitations may apply. View List of Medications Frequently Asked Questions ARE THERE ANY MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS OR COMMITMENTS NECESSARY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS OFFER? No. While we’re sure you’d enjoy the benefits of membership from ShopRite’s Price Plus plan, the Free Diabetes Medication Program stands alone and is available to all customers simply upon the presentation of a valid prescription. No additional purchases are necessary. WHY ARE YOU OFFERING THESE PROGRAMS? The Free Diabetes Medication Program is consistent with ShopRite’s desire and commitment to provide you and your family with superb value, helping you balance your family’s health and wellness in the midst of rising health care costs. BECAUSE THESE PRODUCTS ARE BEING GIVEN FREE, ARE THEY OF INFERIOR QUALITY? Absolutely not! These items are the same high quality FDA approved generic drugs you can expect from ShopRite Pharmacy every single day. MY PRESCRIPTION IS NOT ON THE LIST. HOW WERE THE DRUGS CHOSEN? The drugs being offered provide prescribers with a compreh Continue reading >>

Table Of Medications

Table Of Medications

Medications used to treat type 2 diabetes include: Use this table to look up the different medications that can be used to treat type 2 diabetes. Use the links below to find medications within the table quickly, or click the name of the drug to link to expanded information about the drug. Table of oral medications, incretion-based therapy and amylin analog therapy: Medicine FDA Approval Formulations (color indicated if available by Brand only) Dosing Comments (SE = possible side effects) STIMULATORS OF INSULIN RELEASE (Insulin Secretagogues) – increase insulin secretion from the pancreas1 SULFONYLUREAS (SFUs) Tolbutamide Orinase® various generics 1957 500 mg tablets Initial: 1000-2000 mg daily Range: 250-3000 mg (seldom need >2000 mg/day) Dose: Taken two or three times daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain Preferred SFU for elderly Must be taken 2-3 times daily Glimepiride Amaryl® various generics 11/95 1 mg, 2 mg, 4 mg tablets Initial: 1-2 mg daily Range: 1-8 mg Dose: Taken once daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain Need to take only once daily Glipizide Glucotrol® Glucotrol XL® various generics 5/84 4/94 5 mg, 10 mg tablets ER: 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg tablets Initial: 5 mg daily Range: 2.5-40 mg2 (20 mg for XL) Dose: Taken once or twice (if >15 mg) daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain Preferred SFU for elderly ER = extended release/take once a day Glyburide Micronase®, DiaBeta® various generics 5/84 1.25 mg, 2.5 mg, 5 mg tablets Initial: 2.5-5 mg daily Range: 1.25-20 mg2 Dose: Taken once or twice daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain Glyburide, micronized Glynase PresTab® various generics 3/92 1.5 mg, 3 mg, 4.5 mg, 6 mg micronized tablets Initial: 1.5-3 mg daily Range: 0.75-12 mg Dose: Taken once or twice (if >6 mg) daily SE: hypoglycemia, weight gain GLINIDES Repaglini Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications List

Diabetes Medications List

A diabetes medications list is helpful for understanding the various ways that diabetes can be treated as well as knowing the many different diabetes medication available. There are several different kinds of medications available to a person who has diabetes, but the medications and treatments depend on the Type of Diabetes as well as each individual’s needs and response to medications. Type 1 Diabetes Medicines Type 1 diabetes (juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes-IDDM) is when the body does not make insulin it needs and is usually diagnosed in children or young adults. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little to no insulin, so every person with type 1 diabetes will eventually require insulin. There may be other types of medications that a person with type 1 diabetes will need to take help the body utilize insulin. Type 2 Diabetes Medicines Type 2 diabetes (adult-onset diabetes or noninsulin-dependent diabetes) is when the body isn’t using insulin as it needs to (insulin resistance) and it is the most common kind of diabetes. This is where a healthy diet and exercise are so important and can prevent or control diabetes type 2. However, if the body can’t keep up with the insulin needs, you may need to use various diabetes medications oral or insulin injections. Your doctor will work with you to find the best treatment for you –you may only need one medication or you may need a combination of medications. Many people start with Metformin –an oral diabetes medication. Gestational Diabetes Medicines If diabetes develops for the first time during pregnancy, then this is called Gestational diabetes. The stress and hormones of pregnancy can cause a shortage of insulin and gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women are able to control gestational d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Tweet Diabetes medications are a common form of treatment for people with diabetes. There are many different types of diabetes medicines, or anti-diabetic drugs, and this includes insulin, which has its own area within the site. Whilst each drug is unique in the way it works to help patients with diabetes keep their condition under control, some act similarly to one other and are grouped in the same class of drugs. The way in which they are administered can also differ, with some medicines taken orally and others injected directly into the blood. Are diabetes drugs suitable for all diabetics? Most diabetes drugs are designed for people with type 2 diabetes who are unable to control their blood sugar levels through strict diet and exercise alone. But some, such as metformin, are sometimes taken alongside insulin treatment for people with type 1 diabetes. Medication guides Explore the 18 most common medications for diabetes: Assists insulin in controlling post-meal glucose levels. Can more than one drug be taken at the same time? Depending on individual circumstances, a GP may prescribe more than one anti-diabetic drug to help treat a patient’s diabetes. Watch the video below for more information on the types of diabetes medication available. What are the side effects of anti-diabetic medicines? As with any type of medication, blood glucose-lowering drugs can have a number of side effects. These potentially harmful effects are listed in the patient information leaflet that accompanies the medication, so make sure you check this before starting your drug treatment. You may not experience any of the adverse effects listed, but if you do, consult your doctor and/or diabetes care team as they may be able to suggest another suitable medication for your condition. They will a Continue reading >>

Oral And Injectable (non-insulin) Pharmacological Agents For Type 2 Diabetes

Oral And Injectable (non-insulin) Pharmacological Agents For Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: ABSTRACT Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions throughout the world and will continue to grow and remain the greatest global health challenge the world has ever known: 415 million people have diabetes (1 in 11 adults), and the number of people with the disease is predicted to rise beyond 642 million (55%; 1 in 10 adults) in less than 25 years. Individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are at a significantly greater risk for developing microvascular and macrovascular diseases. In response to the enormity of the growing problem, efforts to identify and develop new pharmacological agents for type 2 diabetes have increased dramatically over the past 25 years. Currently in the US and most other world areas, there are nine classes of orally available pharmacological agents to treat type 2 diabetes: 1) sulfonylureas, 2) meglitinides, 3) metformin (a biguanide), 4) thiazolidinediones, 5) α-glucosidase inhibitors, 6) dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors, 7) bile acid sequestrant, 8) dopamine agonist, and 9) sodium-glucose transport protein (SGLT2) inhibitors. A variety of fixed combination of 2 agents are also available. Besides the many options for insulin, there are also two classes of injectable medications: glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (incretin mimetics) and an amylin analogue. This chapter provides an overview and description of the existing oral and injectable (non-insulin) pharmacological agents for type 2 diabetes along with an up-to-date listing of those agents currently in early and late-stage clinical development. Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions throughout the world and will continue to grow and remain the greatest global health challenge the world has ever known: 415 million people have diabetes Continue reading >>

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