diabetestalk.net

Type 2 Diabetes Medications List

Diabetes Drugs

Diabetes Drugs

Tweet There are a number of different types of diabetes drugs - with some having similar ways of acting. Drugs which act similarly to each other are put into the same class of drugs. Below is a list of the most common diabetes drug classes, an A-Z of all diabetes drugs, how they work, who they are for and which medications fall into these drug classes. Jump to the treatment you’re interested in: Biguanides / Metformin Sulphonylureas Meglitinides / Prandial glucose regulator / Glinides Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors Thiazolidinedione / Glitazones DPP-4 inhibitors / Gliptins Incretin mimetics / GLP-1 analogues Amylin analogues A to Z of diabetes drugs Insulin Insulin is a hormone which helps to regulate blood sugar. A number of different types of insulin are available as medication, with some insulins acting for as long as a day and others acting for only a few hours. However, insulin is prescribed for people with type 1 diabetes and for people with type 2 diabetes who have not responded so well on oral medication (tablets). Read more on insulin Biguanides / Metformin The only available diabetes medication in the biguanides class of drugs is metformin. Biguanides prevent the liver from producing glucose and helps to improve the body’s sensitivity towards insulin. Metformin is commonly used as a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes and may occasionally be prescribed, in combination with insulin, for people with type 1 diabetes. Read more on metformin Sulphonylureas Sulphonylureas are the class of antidiabetic drug for type 2 diabetes that tends to include those drugs which end in ‘ide’. The following drugs are all in the sulphonylureas class (branded names in brackets): Glibenclamide –also known as Glyburide (Daonil) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Gliquidone (Glurenorm) Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetic Medication List And Guide

Type 2 Diabetic Medication List And Guide

While there are way too many type 2 diabetes medications to list in a single article, I will briefly describe some of the most common ones as well as their generic names and brand names in parenthesis. What you’ll find is that the generic terms within the same category of medications often have similar roots, which makes it easier to remember some of them. Sometimes insurance companies won’t cover the particular medication you’d like, but will cover another medication in that same class that may work very similarly. Sulfonylureas What are they called? The most commonly used sulfonylureas used today are: Glipizide (Glucotrol), Glyburide (Micronase, Glynase, Diabeta), and Glimepiride (Amaryl). How do they work? Sulfonylureas are some of the oldest diabetic medications. They work by stimulating the beta-cells in the pancreas to produce more insulin. They are taken 1-2 times daily with meals and work to lower blood sugar independently of food intake. For example, they will lower blood glucose regardless of the meal eaten or if a meal is skipped, which makes them more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Both fasting and post-meal blood glucose are targeted in these meds and the average A1c reduction with the addition of sulfonylureas is 1.5-2%. Advantages The main advantage of sulfonylureas is that they are very inexpensive, taken orally, covered by nearly all (if not all) insurance companies. Disadvantages Sulfonylureas can cause weight gain and hypoglycemia. Additionally, they may be linked with ischemic preconditioning, which may lead to heart disease or cardiac events over time. And they generally stop working effectively over time. Biguanides What are they called? There is only one medication in this class and that is glucophage (Metformin). How do they work? Glucophage Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Tweet Diabetes medications are a common form of treatment for people with diabetes. There are many different types of diabetes medicines, or anti-diabetic drugs, and this includes insulin, which has its own area within the site. Whilst each drug is unique in the way it works to help patients with diabetes keep their condition under control, some act similarly to one other and are grouped in the same class of drugs. The way in which they are administered can also differ, with some medicines taken orally and others injected directly into the blood. Are diabetes drugs suitable for all diabetics? Most diabetes drugs are designed for people with type 2 diabetes who are unable to control their blood sugar levels through strict diet and exercise alone. But some, such as metformin, are sometimes taken alongside insulin treatment for people with type 1 diabetes. Medication guides Explore the 18 most common medications for diabetes: Assists insulin in controlling post-meal glucose levels. Can more than one drug be taken at the same time? Depending on individual circumstances, a GP may prescribe more than one anti-diabetic drug to help treat a patient’s diabetes. Watch the video below for more information on the types of diabetes medication available. What are the side effects of anti-diabetic medicines? As with any type of medication, blood glucose-lowering drugs can have a number of side effects. These potentially harmful effects are listed in the patient information leaflet that accompanies the medication, so make sure you check this before starting your drug treatment. You may not experience any of the adverse effects listed, but if you do, consult your doctor and/or diabetes care team as they may be able to suggest another suitable medication for your condition. They will a Continue reading >>

Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medications List

Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medications List

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose because the body cannot produce enough insulin or it becomes resistant to it. There are 2 forms of diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In the United States, 90% of patients are suffering from T2D. Patients with T1D require injectable insulin to control their levels of blood sugar because they cannot produce insulin naturally. On the other hand, patients with T2D can usually manage their condition through oral diabetes drugs, proper diet and regular exercise. In some cases, type 2 diabetic patients may take injectable diabetes medication to help them manage their levels of blood sugar. It is important to control blood sugar levels so as to prevent the risk of long-term diabetes complications. Injectable type 2 diabetes medications Injectable diabetes medications are usually prescribed when oral diabetes medications fail to control the level of blood sugar in type 2 diabetic patients. Injectable drugs that are used by type 2 diabetic patients could either be insulin-based or non-insulin injectables, such as Amylin. Injectable insulin is usually the last treatment to be prescribed to patients with T2D, and is only added when oral diabetes drugs like metformin or non-insulin injections fail to work. Here is the list of injectable type 2 diabetes drugs. Adlyxin Adlyxin is a once daily injectable diabetic drug that is usually prescribed together with diet and exercise program. Adlyxin is a new injectable drug in a class of drugs called GLP-1 or glucagon like peptide 1. Adlyxin should be used to control the levels of blood sugar in type 2 diabetic people and not those with T1D. The common side effects of Adlyxin include: Diarrhea; Dizzi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications List

Diabetes Medications List

A diabetes medications list is helpful for understanding the various ways that diabetes can be treated as well as knowing the many different diabetes medication available. There are several different kinds of medications available to a person who has diabetes, but the medications and treatments depend on the Type of Diabetes as well as each individual’s needs and response to medications. Type 1 Diabetes Medicines Type 1 diabetes (juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes-IDDM) is when the body does not make insulin it needs and is usually diagnosed in children or young adults. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little to no insulin, so every person with type 1 diabetes will eventually require insulin. There may be other types of medications that a person with type 1 diabetes will need to take help the body utilize insulin. Type 2 Diabetes Medicines Type 2 diabetes (adult-onset diabetes or noninsulin-dependent diabetes) is when the body isn’t using insulin as it needs to (insulin resistance) and it is the most common kind of diabetes. This is where a healthy diet and exercise are so important and can prevent or control diabetes type 2. However, if the body can’t keep up with the insulin needs, you may need to use various diabetes medications oral or insulin injections. Your doctor will work with you to find the best treatment for you –you may only need one medication or you may need a combination of medications. Many people start with Metformin –an oral diabetes medication. Gestational Diabetes Medicines If diabetes develops for the first time during pregnancy, then this is called Gestational diabetes. The stress and hormones of pregnancy can cause a shortage of insulin and gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women are able to control gestational d Continue reading >>

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Understanding Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes occurs when your body no longer makes or uses insulin as it’s intended to. Insulin is a naturally occurring substance in the body, but some people don’t make enough of it or their cells become insulin resistant. Diabetic patients must manage higher than normal blood sugar (or glucose) levels in the body. Diabetes is classified into two types (Type 1 and Type 2). Diabetics of both types require medicines to normalize blood glucose levels. If the doctor says you’re diabetic, he or she will prescribe drugs for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It’s good to know about the universe of treatment options diabetics have today. Here’s a comprehensive list of available diabetes medications along with links to Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes medication prices that will help you save up to 90% off U.S. retail prices. You may also find our Cheat Sheet helpful: 12 Ways to Save Money on Your Diabetes Medications [Cheat Sheet] Type 1 Diabetes Medications Short-Action Insulin Brand names: Novolin and Humulin (regular insulin) are two commonly prescribed, short-acting drugs your doctor may prescribe. Rapid-Action Insulin Brand names: Levemir FlexPen and NovoLog Flexpen are two commonly prescribed rapid action insulins. Brand name: Humalog Pen (insulin lispro) Brand name: Apidra (insulin glulisine) Intermediate-Action Insulin Brand name: Novolin N and Humulin N Pen (insulin isophane) are two intermediate-action insulins your doctor may prescribe. Long-Action Insulin Brand name Tresiba (insulin degludec) Brand name Levemir Flexpen (insulin detemir) Brand name Lantus Vials (insulin glargine) Brand name Toujeo (insulin glargine) Combination Medications Insulin Brand name: Ryzodeg Brand name: NovoLog Mix 70/30 Brand name: Novolin 70/30 Brand na Continue reading >>

For Those With Diabetes, Older Drugs Are Often Best

For Those With Diabetes, Older Drugs Are Often Best

WHEN it comes to prescription drugs, newer is not necessarily better. And that’s especially true when treating diabetes. One in 10 Americans has Type 2 diabetes. If the trend continues, one in three will suffer from the disease by the year 2050, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most Type 2 diabetes patients take one or more drugs to control blood sugar. They spent an estimated $12.5 billion on medication in 2007, twice the amount spent in 2001, according to a study by the University of Chicago. (That figure does not including drugs that diabetics are often prescribed for related health conditions, like high blood pressure and high cholesterol.) Why the increase? More diagnosed patients, more drugs per patient and an onslaught of expensive new drugs, according to Dr. G. Caleb Alexander, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago and lead author of the study. Since 1995, several new classes of diabetes medications have come on the market. Diabetes drugs are important to the pharmaceutical industry, more lucrative than drugs for many other chronic diseases, Dr. Alexander noted in an interview. Simply put, many of these drugs help the body produce less glucose or more insulin, the hormone that shuttles glucose into cells for use as energy, or they increase the body’s sensitivity to its own insulin. Patients and health care professionals have long hoped that as pharmaceutical companies found ways to help the body lower blood sugar, they would produce safer and more efficient alternatives to older medications. But a true breakthrough doesn’t seem to have happened yet. A report released in March by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins University reviewed Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Medication Is The Best?

Which Diabetes Medication Is The Best?

Type 2 diabetes is often referred to as the “silent killer”, and many people don’t even know they have the disease – until it is too late. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), in 2012 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by this serious metabolic disorder. Type 2 diabetes is preceded by insulin resistance and progressive insulin secretory defects, whereas type 1 is usually diagnosed in children, occurring when the body does not produce any insulin. Fortunately there are many treatment options for type 2 diabetes, and we compared the most common diabetes medications. Read: FDA approves 1st 'artificial pancreas' for type 1 diabetes 1. Biguanides Names: Metformin, Glucophage, Glumetza How it works: This is the most common medication for type 2 diabetes. It works by decreasing the amount of glucose that your liver releases and helps to restore a natural response to insulin. Effectiveness: Most experts agree it might be an old drug, but it’s still the most widely used and probably the most effective medication. A recent study from the State University of Rio de Janeiro found it’s still the first line of treatment, even when used in combination with other medication. Possible side-effects: An upset stomach, vomiting, nausea 2. Sulfonylureas iStock Names: Diabinese, Tolinase, Glipizide How it works: These medications lower blood glucose levels and increase the amount of insulin produced by the pancreas. Effectiveness: Sulfonylurea drugs have been in use since the 1950s and a lot of newer medications have similar workings (and are generally cheaper). But many physicians still prescribe these medications when Biguanides are either not as effective, or when the side-effects of the latter are too severe. Possible side-effects: Hypoglycaemia, weight gain Continue reading >>

Sick Day Medication List

Sick Day Medication List

Instructions for Healthcare Professionals: If patients become ill and are unable to maintain adequate fluid intake, or have an acute decline in renal function (e.g. due to gastrointestinal upset or dehydration), they should be instructed to hold medications which will: A) Increase risk for a decline in kidney function: • Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor • Angiotensin receptor blockers • Direct renin inhibitors • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs • Diuretics • SGLT2 inhibitors B) Have reduced clearance and increase risk for adverse effects: • Metformin • Sulfonylureas (gliclazide, glimepiride, glyburide) S sulfonylureas A ACE-inhibitors D diuretics, direct renin inhibitors M metformin A angiotensin receptor blockers N non-steroidal anti-inflamatory S SGLT2 inhibitors Please complete the following card and give it to your patient. Patients should be instructed that increased frequency of self blood glucose monitoring will be required and adjustments to their doses of insulin or oral antihyperglycemic agents may be necessary. Instructions for Patients When you are ill, particularly if you become dehydrated (e.g. vomiting or diarrhea), some medicines could cause your kidney function to worsen or result in side effects. If you become sick and are unable to drink enough fluid to keep hydrated, you should STOP the following medications: • Blood pressure pills • Water pills • Metformin • Diabetes pills • Pain medications • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (see below) ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Please be careful not to take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (which are commonly foun Continue reading >>

Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

Medication For Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are often given medications including insulin to help control their blood glucose levels. Most of these medications are in the form of tablets, but some are given by injection. Tablets or injections are intended to be used in conjunction with healthy eating and regular physical activity, not as a substitute. Diabetes tablets are not an oral form of insulin.Speak with your doctor or pharmacist if you experience any problems. An alternative medication is usually available. All people with diabetes need to check their glucose levels on a regular basis. When taking medication, you may need to check your glucose levels more often to keep you safe and to ensure the medication is having the desired effect. In Australia there are seven classes of medicines used to treat type 2 diabetes: Biguanides Sulphonylureas Thiazolidinediones (Glitazones) Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitors. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors Incretin mimetics Sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT2) inhibitors Your doctor will talk to you about which tablets are right for you, when to take your tablets and how much to take. Your doctor can also tell you about any possible side effects. You should speak to your doctor or pharmacist if you experience any problems. Chemical name: METFORMIN , METFORMIN ER Points to remember about biguanides This group of insulin tablets helps to lower blood glucose levels by reducing the amount of stored glucose released by the liver, slowing the absorption of glucose from the intestine, and helping the body to become more sensitive to insulin so that your own insulin works better They need to be started at a low dose and increased slowly Metformin is often prescribed as the first diabetes tablet for people with type 2 diabetes who are overweight. It gene Continue reading >>

Medications For Diabetes

Medications For Diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, insulin is usually started right away, since the pancreas is no longer producing insulin. In type 2 diabetes, if making the appropriate lifestyle changes doesn't bring the sugar levels close to target within a reasonable timeframe, medication will be prescribed to further lower blood sugar levels. The insulin that people with diabetes use today is a man-made protein that is structurally identical or close to identical to the insulin normally made by the pancreas. Insulins are classified by their duration of action - some work immediately and others lower blood sugar over longer periods of time. All insulins must be injected into subcutaneous tissue (the fat just under the skin surface) where they are absorbed into the blood stream. They are administered using a syringe, a pen device, or an insulin pump. In some situations, insulin can also be given intravenously, but this is typically only for patients admitted to a hospital. Medications for type 2 diabetes There are many types of medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. Here is a list of medications that are available and commonly used in Canada: acarbose (Glucobay®) alogliptin (Nesina®) canagliflozin (Invokana®) dapagliflozin (Forxiga®) exenatide (Byetta®) gliclazide (Diamicron®, Diamicron® MR, generics) glimepiride (Amaryl®, generics) glyburide (Diabeta®, generics) insulin (various) linagliptin (Trajenta®) liraglutide (Victoza®) metformin (Glucophage®, Glumetza®, generics) metformin - rosiglitazone (Avandamet®) nateglinide (Starlix®) pioglitazone (Actos®, generics) repaglinide (Gluconorm®) rosiglitazone (Avandia®) saxagliptin (Onglyza®) sitagliptin (Januvia®) sitagliptin - metformin (Janumet®) tolbutamide (generics) You may have to try different types of medication before fi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Understanding Medication - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Understanding Medication - Nhs.uk

Most people need medicine to control their type 2 diabetes. Medicine helps keep your blood sugar level as normal as possible to prevent health problems. You'll have to take it for the rest of your life. Diabetes usually gets worse over time, so your medicine or dose may need to change. Adjusting your diet and being active is also necessary to keep your blood sugar level down. Diabetes medicines help lower the amount of sugar in your blood. There are many types of medicine for type 2 diabetes. It can take time to find a medicine and dose that's right for you. You'll usually be offered a medicine called metformin first. If your blood sugar levels aren't lower within 3 months, you may need another medicine. Over time, you may need a combination of medicines. Your GP or diabetes nurse will recommend the medicines most suitable for you. Insulin isn't often used for type 2 diabetes in the early years. It's only needed when other medicines no longer work. Diabetes UK has more information about taking medicines for type 2 diabetes . Your GP or diabetes nurse will explain how to take your medicine and how to store it. If you need to inject insulin or medicine called gliptins, they'll show you how. Your diabetes medicine may cause side effects. These can include: If you feel unwell after taking medicine or notice any side effects, speak to your GP or diabetes nurse. Don't stop taking medication without getting advice. How to get free prescriptions for diabetes medication You're entitled to free prescriptions for your diabetes medication. To claim your free prescriptions, you'll need to apply for an exemption certificate. To do this: you should get the certificate in the post about a week later it will last for 5 years take it to your pharmacy with your prescriptions Save your re Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes Medication

Free Diabetes Medication

30-day supply of generic Diabetes medication Since 2009 ShopRite pharmacies have dispensed nearly 5 million Free diabetes prescriptions! Some of the medications that we offer are: Metformin Glimepiride Glipizide Glipizide XL Glyburide Glimepiride A diabetes diagnosis can spur many questions. Different types of diabetes call for different medications and treatment. We are here to help alleviate your concerns and guide you along the best path for proper treatment and management. Speak to your ShopRite pharmacist today to inquire about our free diabetes medications and a Free Blood Glucose Monitor. Our Pharmacists are happy to answer any questions or concerns you may have. *All diabetes medications require a valid prescription. Quantity limitations may apply. View List of Medications Frequently Asked Questions ARE THERE ANY MEMBERSHIP REQUIREMENTS OR COMMITMENTS NECESSARY TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS OFFER? No. While we’re sure you’d enjoy the benefits of membership from ShopRite’s Price Plus plan, the Free Diabetes Medication Program stands alone and is available to all customers simply upon the presentation of a valid prescription. No additional purchases are necessary. WHY ARE YOU OFFERING THESE PROGRAMS? The Free Diabetes Medication Program is consistent with ShopRite’s desire and commitment to provide you and your family with superb value, helping you balance your family’s health and wellness in the midst of rising health care costs. BECAUSE THESE PRODUCTS ARE BEING GIVEN FREE, ARE THEY OF INFERIOR QUALITY? Absolutely not! These items are the same high quality FDA approved generic drugs you can expect from ShopRite Pharmacy every single day. MY PRESCRIPTION IS NOT ON THE LIST. HOW WERE THE DRUGS CHOSEN? The drugs being offered provide prescribers with a compreh Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs

Diabetes Drugs

Tweet There are a number of different types of diabetes drugs - with some having similar ways of acting. Drugs which act similarly to each other are put into the same class of drugs. Below is a list of the most common diabetes drug classes, an A-Z of all diabetes drugs, how they work, who they are for and which medications fall into these drug classes. Jump to the treatment you’re interested in: Biguanides / Metformin Sulphonylureas Meglitinides / Prandial glucose regulator / Glinides Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors Thiazolidinedione / Glitazones DPP-4 inhibitors / Gliptins Incretin mimetics / GLP-1 analogues Amylin analogues A to Z of diabetes drugs Insulin Insulin is a hormone which helps to regulate blood sugar. A number of different types of insulin are available as medication, with some insulins acting for as long as a day and others acting for only a few hours. However, insulin is prescribed for people with type 1 diabetes and for people with type 2 diabetes who have not responded so well on oral medication (tablets). Read more on insulin Biguanides / Metformin The only available diabetes medication in the biguanides class of drugs is metformin. Biguanides prevent the liver from producing glucose and helps to improve the body’s sensitivity towards insulin. Metformin is commonly used as a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes and may occasionally be prescribed, in combination with insulin, for people with type 1 diabetes. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose Continue reading >>

9 Types Of Medication That Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

9 Types Of Medication That Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Sometimes people with type 2 diabetes are able to bring their blood glucose levels under control through a combination of weight loss, diet, and exercise, but many people with diabetes take medication to manage their condition. For some, a single diabetes medication is effective, while in other cases a combination of drugs works better. “If diabetes control is suboptimal on the maximum dose of one medication, it’s prudent to add on a second agent,” says Deepashree Gupta, MD, assistant professor of endocrinology at Saint Louis University in Missouri. There are many drugs available to treat type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes care team can help you understand the differences among the types of medication on this long list, and will explain how you take them, what they do, and what side effects they may cause. Your doctor will discuss your specific situation and your options for adding one or more types of medication to your treatment. Types of Medication for Type 2 Diabetes In type 2 diabetes, even though insulin resistance is what leads to the condition, injections of insulin are not the first resort. Instead, other drugs are used to help boost insulin production and the body’s regulation of it. Insulin resistance occurs when the body’s cells don’t respond properly to insulin, which is a hormone made in the pancreas that’s responsible for ferrying glucose to cells for energy. When cells are resistant to insulin, they don’t use the insulin effectively to bring the glucose from the bloodstream into the cell. The pancreas needs to produce more insulin to overcome this resistance in an effort to normalize blood sugar levels. When the pancreas can’t keep up with the insulin demands in a person with insulin resistance, that person develops diabetes. Below is an ov Continue reading >>

More in diabetes