diabetestalk.net

Type 2 Diabetes Intervention

Lifestyle Intervention For Type 2 Diabetes Patients Trial Protocol Of The Copenhagen Type 2 Diabetes Rehabilitation Project

Lifestyle Intervention For Type 2 Diabetes Patients Trial Protocol Of The Copenhagen Type 2 Diabetes Rehabilitation Project

Lifestyle intervention for type 2 diabetes patients trial protocol of The Copenhagen Type 2 Diabetes Rehabilitation Project Vadstrup et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2009 Current guidelines recommend education, physical activity and changes in diet for type 2 diabetes patients, yet the composition and organization of non-pharmacological care are still controversial. Therefore, it is very important that programmes aiming to improve non-pharmacological treatment of type 2 diabetes are developed and evaluated. The Copenhagen Type 2 Diabetes Rehabilitation Project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a new group-based lifestyle rehabilitation programme in a Health Care Centre in primary care. The group-based diabetes rehabilitation programme consists of empowerment-based education, supervised exercise and dietary intervention. The effectiveness of this multi-disciplinary intervention is compared with conventional individual counselling in a Diabetes Outpatient Clinic and evaluated in a prospective and randomized controlled trial. During the recruitment period of 18 months 180 type 2 diabetes patients will be randomized to the intervention group and the control group. Effects on glycaemic control, quality of life, self-rated diabetes symptoms, body composition, blood pressure, lipids, insulin resistance, beta-cell function and physical fitness will be examined after 6, 12 and 24 months. The Copenhagen Type 2 Diabetes Rehabilitation Project evaluates a multi-disciplinary non-pharmacological intervention programme in a primary care setting and provides important information about how to organize non-pharmacological care for type 2 diabetes patients. Glycaemic ControlHealth Care CentreSupervise ExerciseDiabetes Outpatient ClinicInclude Patient Education Type 2 diabetes mell Continue reading >>

Family Intervention To Control Type 2 Diabetes: A Controlled Clinical Trial

Family Intervention To Control Type 2 Diabetes: A Controlled Clinical Trial

Family intervention to control type 2 diabetes: a controlled clinical trial Family Medicine Department, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Santiago, Chile Correspondence to Diego Garca-Huidobro, Departamento de Medicina Familiar, Vicua Mackenna 4686, Macul, Santiago, Chile; E-mail: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Family Medicine Department, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Santiago, Chile Search for other works by this author on: Family Medicine Department, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Santiago, Chile Search for other works by this author on: Family Medicine Department, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Santiago, Chile Search for other works by this author on: Family Practice, Volume 28, Issue 1, 1 February 2011, Pages 411, Diego Garca-Huidobro, Marcela Bittner, Paulina Brahm, Klaus Puschel; Family intervention to control type 2 diabetes: a controlled clinical trial, Family Practice, Volume 28, Issue 1, 1 February 2011, Pages 411, Purpose. Chilean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have a low rate of blood sugar control. We studied the effectiveness of a culturally sensitive family oriented intervention designed to improve metabolic control in primary care patients with uncontrolled T2DM. Methods. Patients with T2DM from three primary care clinics in Santiago, Chile were randomly selected for inclusion if they had a recent HbA1c 7%, were between 18 and 70 years old and lived with a family member. Patients from one clinic received the family oriented intervention; patients from the other two (control) clinics received standard care. The intervention involved family members in care and included family counselling during clinic visits, family meetings and home visits. The primary outcome was HbA1c, Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Interventions To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review Of Economic Evaluation Studies

Lifestyle Interventions To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review Of Economic Evaluation Studies

Lifestyle Interventions to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluation Studies Koffi Alouki ,1 Hlne Delisle ,1,* Clara Bermdez-Tamayo ,2 and Mira Johri 3,4 1TRANSNUT, WHO Collaborating Centre on Nutrition Changes and Development, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, 2405 Chemin de la Cte Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1A8 1TRANSNUT, WHO Collaborating Centre on Nutrition Changes and Development, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, 2405 Chemin de la Cte Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1A8 2Institut de Recherche en Sant Publique de l'Universit de Montral (IRSPUM), University of Montreal, 7101 Avenue du Parc, 3e tage, Montral, QC, Canada H3N 1X9 3Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Universit de Montral (CRCHUM), Tour Saint-Antoine, 850 Rue Saint-Denis, Montral, QC, Canada H2X 0A9 4Department of Health Administration, School of Public Health (ESPUM), Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, 7101 Avenue du Parc, 3e tage, Montral, QC, Canada H3N 1X9 1TRANSNUT, WHO Collaborating Centre on Nutrition Changes and Development, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, 2405 Chemin de la Cte Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1A8 2Institut de Recherche en Sant Publique de l'Universit de Montral (IRSPUM), University of Montreal, 7101 Avenue du Parc, 3e tage, Montral, QC, Canada H3N 1X9 3Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Universit de Montral (CRCHUM), Tour Saint-Antoine, 850 Rue Saint-Denis, Montral, QC, Canada H2X 0A9 4Department of Health Administration, School of Public Health (ESPUM), Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, 7101 Avenue du Parc, 3e tage, Montral, QC, Canada H3N 1X9 Received 2015 Jul 17 Continue reading >>

Nonpharmacological Interventions For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Nonpharmacological Interventions For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Nonpharmacological interventions for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus P. E. Schwarz is physician and professor for prevention and care of diabetes. His MD thesis was awarded from the University of Dresden on genetics of chronic diseases and his PhD thesis on mechnisms of diabetes prevention. The main focus of his work is on the implementation and evaluation of type 2 diabetes prevention programmes. He is the coordinator of the European project IMAGE and was involved in the DE-PLAN project and initiated the Global Network Active in diabetes prevcention and the Global Diabetes Survey. Peter Schwarz is leading a number of international activities focusing on the realisation of chronic care prevention programmes in real-world health care. C. J. Greaves is a Chartered Psychologist and a Senior Research Fellow. His research involves developing and evaluating interventions to support health-related behaviour change. He has helped to develop intervention and training materials for supporting weight loss, physical activity and smoking cessation, as well as NICE guidance and a European guideline on the prevention of type 2 diabetes. J. Lindstrm is a nutritionist with a doctoral degree in public health. The main focus of her work is on prevention of type 2 diabetes, with special emphasis on dietary factors. She is the co-ordinator of the DPS and has been involved with the DE-PLAN and the IMAGE projects. She has also helped develop the Finnish diabetes risk score FINDRISC. T. Yates specializes in the role of lifestyle, particularly physical activity, in the prevention and treatment of chronic disease. He has helped lead on the development, evaluation and implementation of diabetes prevention pathways within routine clinical care in the United Kingdom and has been involve Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Interventions Can Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Lifestyle Interventions Can Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Lifestyle Interventions Can Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk Comprehensive lifestyle interventions may reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes in patients who are at high risk for the disease, but the interventions do not appear to reduce all-cause mortality in patients with the disease, according to a systematic literature review. Elizabeth Sumamo Schellenberg, BSc, MPH, and colleagues from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, present their findings in an article published in the October 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. "Many systematic reviews have reported a benefit with exercise and dietary interventions in diabetes prevention," the authors write. "However, we are not aware of any reviews that assessed the effect of multifaceted lifestyle interventions on clinically oriented outcomes across a spectrum of metabolic risk factors and abnormal glucose. Therefore, Dr. Schellenberg and colleagues searched 5 electronic databases (MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, EMBASE, and SCOPUS) to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of multifaceted interventions (a exercise component, a diet component, and a third component) on the clinical outcomes of adult patients with type 2 diabetes or who were at high risk for the disease. They identified 9 studies of high-risk patients and 11 studies of patients with type 2 diabetes. For studies of high-risk patients, the duration of the intervention ranged from 6 to 72 months compared with 6 to 93 months for the studies of patients with type 2 diabetes. Among high-risk patients, the lifestyle intervention was associated with a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes (risk ratio [RR], 0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14 - 0.85), and the efficacy of the intervention was main Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management: Intensive Lifestyle Interventions For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Management: Intensive Lifestyle Interventions For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) recommends intensive lifestyle interventions for patients with type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control and reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Intervention Intensive lifestyle interventions provide ongoing counseling, coaching, or individualized guidance to patients with type 2 diabetes to help them change their diet, level of physical activity, or both. Patients must interact with program staff multiple times for a period of six months or longer. Dietary components may include tailored advice, and physical activity components may include structured and personalized guidance or supervised exercise training. Programs may have weight loss goals or include additional components related to weight loss or maintenance. The largest and longest trial to date provided intensive individual and group counseling and extended interpersonal support for dietary changes, regular physical activity, and weight management. Read the full CPSTF Finding and Rationale Statement [PDF - 603 kB] for details including implementation issues, possible added benefits, potential harms, and evidence gaps. This expedited finding was based on the following published systematic review: Huang XL, Pan JH, Chen D, Chen J, Hu TT. Efficacy of lifestyle interventions in patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Internal Medicine 2016;27;37-47. Promotional Materials Continue reading >>

Programs | Diabetes Interventions

Programs | Diabetes Interventions

Health-related programs for type 2 diabetes prevention and control 1-2 Employee programs refer to activities that include active employee involvement, such as classes, seminars or competitions. Employee programs are frequently provided on-site at the workplace. Employee health surveys in the workplace provide assessment and implementation opportunities Information from employee health surveys can be used to identify the percent of employees that have received appropriately timed type 2 diabetes screening (e.g., blood glucose testing) Survey information can be used not only in obtaining baseline group data on employee health but also to educate individual employees to their needs for counseling and follow-up for specific health concerns Assessment should also include employees’ responses regarding lifestyle issues such as obesity, nutrition, and physical activity Blood glucose testing should be carried out within the health care setting because of the need for follow-up and discussion of abnormal results. Community screening outside a health care setting is not recommended Use multifaceted employee lifestyle change participation programs Obesity, nutrition, and physical activity programs in the workplace are critical elements in addressing type 2 diabetes Research suggests that the progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. In 2001, results from landmark clinical trials, including the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), showed that sustained lifestyle changes that included modest weight loss and physical activity substantially reduced progression to type 2 diabetes among adults who were at very high risk The lifestyle intervention worked equally well for men and women and all racial/ethnic groups, and it was most effective among people Continue reading >>

Intensive Lifestyle Intervention For Type 2 Diabetesreply

Intensive Lifestyle Intervention For Type 2 Diabetesreply

Intensive Lifestyle Intervention for Type 2 DiabetesReply 1Centre for Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark JAMA. 2017;318(24):2494-2495. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.17240 Effect of a Lifestyle Intervention on Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mette YunJohansen,MSc; Christopher ScottMacDonald,MSc; Katrine BaggeHansen,MD, PhD; KristianKarstoft,MD, PhD; RobinChristensen,PhD; MariaPedersen,MD, PhD; Louise SeierHansen,MSc; MortenZacho,MSc; Anne-SophieWedell-Neergaard,MD; Signe TellerupNielsen,MD, PhD; Ulrik WiningIepsen,MD, PhD; HenningLangberg,DMSc; Allan ArthurVaag,DMSc; Bente KlarlundPedersen,DMSc; MathiasRied-Larsen,PhD In Reply Dr Giugliano and colleagues raise concerns about the lack of information on type 2 diabetes remission as an outcome in our trial, which complicates comparisons with other lifestyle intervention studies. Moreover, the authors suggest that the lower HbA1c levels at entry to the study may have been responsible for the modest reduction in HbA1c and that physical activity is of lesser importance compared with different dietary components in the care of patients with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Long-term Benefits From Lifestyle Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Long-term Benefits From Lifestyle Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Long-Term Benefits From Lifestyle Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes Prevention We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Long-Term Benefits From Lifestyle Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Jaakko Tuomilehto, MD, MA, PHD, Peter Schwarz, MD, and Jaana Lindstrm, PHD The potential to prevent type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals by lifestyle intervention was established in several clinical trials. These studies had a strong focus on increased physical activity and dietary modification as well as weight reduction among overweight participants. The key issue seems to be a comprehensive approach to correct several risk factors simultaneously. Furthermore, long-term follow-up studies of lifestyle interventions lasting for a limited time period seem to have a long-lasting carry-over effect on risk factors and diabetes incidence ( Table 1 ). Long-term effectiveness of diabetes prevention trials The research evidence has inspired national and local authorities and health care providers all over the world to start programs and activities to prevent type 2 diabetes and its complications. Based on the experiences from the clinical trials, as well as from the real world implementation programs, the IMAGE (Development and Implementation of a European Guideline and Training Standards for Diabetes Prevention) Study Group collated information in a systematic manner. The IMAGE deliverables include a European evidence-based guide Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes. Relevance For Clinical Practice.

Lifestyle Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes. Relevance For Clinical Practice.

Lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes. Relevance for clinical practice. Centre for Studies in Family Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. OBJECTIVE: To review evidence from literature on type 2 diabetes pertinent to physical activity and diet and lifestyle modification, and to determine the relevance of this evidence to clinical practice. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Direct (level I) evidence supports interventions for physical activity and diet modification for primary prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Few studies examine the effectiveness of primary health care providers' making such interventions. MAIN MESSAGE: Family physicians have an important role in identifying people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes and managing those diagnosed with the disease, yet they struggle to deliver practice-based interventions that promote sustainable behaviour change among their patients. CONCLUSION: It is evident that supporting patients to make changes in their physical activity and dietary habits can prevent onset of type 2 diabetes. Translating this finding into effective recommendations for clinical practice requires further effort and evaluation. The Full Text of this article is available as a PDF (202K). These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Dawson Keith G, Gomes Daniel, Gerstein Hertzel, Blanchard James F, Kahler Kristijan H. The economic cost of diabetes in Canada, 1998. Diabetes Care. 2002 Aug;25(8):13031307. [ PubMed ] Gerstein HC, Meltzer S. Preventive medicine in people at high risk for chronic disease: the value of identifying and treating diabetes. CMAJ. 1999 Jun 1;160(11):15931596. [ PMC free article ] [ PubMed ] Kaur Jasjeet, S Continue reading >>

Long-term Effectiveness Of A Lifestyle Intervention For The Primary Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes In A Low Socio-economic Community An Intervention Follow-up Study On Reunion Island

Long-term Effectiveness Of A Lifestyle Intervention For The Primary Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes In A Low Socio-economic Community An Intervention Follow-up Study On Reunion Island

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Long-Term Effectiveness of a Lifestyle Intervention for the Primary Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in a Low Socio-Economic Community An Intervention Follow-Up Study on Reunion Island Affiliations Centre dInvestigation Clinique de la Runion (CIC 1410), Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (Inserm), Saint-Pierre, la Runion, France, Centre dInvestigation Clinique de la Runion (CIC 1410), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Runion (CHU la Runion), Saint-Pierre, la Runion, France, Unit Mixte de Recherche 1027 (UMR1027), Universit Toulouse III Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse, France, Unit Mixte de Recherche 1027 (UMR1027), Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (Inserm), Toulouse, France Affiliations Centre dInvestigation Clinique de la Runion (CIC 1410), Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (Inserm), Saint-Pierre, la Runion, France, Centre dInvestigation Clinique de la Runion (CIC 1410), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Runion (CHU la Runion), Saint-Pierre, la Runion, France Affiliations Centre dInvestigation Clinique de la Runion (CIC 1410), Institut National de la Sant et de la Recherche Mdicale (Inserm), Saint-Pierre, la Runion, France, Centre dInvestigation Clinique de la Runion (CIC 1410), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Runion (CHU la Runion), Saint-Pierre, la Runion, France Affiliation Service dEndocrinologie, Diabtologie et de Nutrition, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire la Runion (CHU la Runion), Saint-Pierre, la Runion, France Affiliations Unit Mixte de Recherche 1027 (UMR1027), Universit Toulouse III Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse, France, Unit Mixte de Recherche 1027 (UMR1027), Institut National Continue reading >>

Effect Of Lifestyle Intervention In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis

Effect Of Lifestyle Intervention In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis

Abstract The effect of lifestyle intervention on clinical risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes is unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of comprehensive lifestyle change, such as diet, exercise, and education, on clinical markers that are risk-factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. We searched Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar (up to August 31, 2013) for randomized controlled trials that compared standard of care (control group) with treatment regimens that included changes in lifestyle (intervention group). The primary outcome was reduction in risk factors of cardiovascular disease including body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). A total of 16 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The standardized difference in means of change from baseline significantly favored the intervention compared with the control group in BMI (− 0.29; 95% CI, − 0.52 to − 0.06, P = 0.014), HbA1c (− 0.37; 95% CI, − 0.59 to − 0.14, P = 0.001), SBP (− 0.16: 95% CI, − 0.29 to − 0.03, P = 0.016), DBP (− 0.27, 95% CI = − 0.41 to − 0.12, P < 0.001). There was no difference between the intervention and control groups in HDL-c (0.05; 95% CI, − 0.10 to 0.21; P = 0.503) and LDL-c (− 0.14; 95% CI, − 0.29 to 0.02; P = 0.092). The meta-analysis found that lifestyle intervention showed significant benefit in risk factors that are known to be associated with development of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Fig. 1. Flow chart for study selection. Fig. 2. The quality assessment for each included study was sum Continue reading >>

Strategies For Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: An Update For Clinicians

Strategies For Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: An Update For Clinicians

Strategies for preventing type 2 diabetes: an update for clinicians We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Strategies for preventing type 2 diabetes: an update for clinicians Kaivan Khavandi, Halima Amer, [...], and Jack Brownrigg Diabetes is a major and growing public health challenge which threatens to overwhelm medical services in the future. Type 2 diabetes confers significant morbidity and mortality, most notably with target organ damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. The magnitude of cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes is best illustrated by its position as a coronary heart disease risk equivalent. Complications related to neuropathy are also vast, often working in concert with vascular abnormalities and resulting in serious clinical consequences such as foot ulceration. Increased understanding of the natural history of this disorder has generated the potential to intervene and halt pathological progression before overt disease ensues, after which point management becomes increasingly challenging. The concept of prediabetes as a formal diagnosis has begun to be translated from the research setting to clinical practice, but with continually updated guidelines, varied nomenclature, emerging pharmacotherapies and an ever-changing evidence base, clinicians may be left uncertain of best practice in identifying and managing patients at the prediabetic stage. This review aims to summarize the epidemiolo Continue reading >>

Nutrition Interventions For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes: Conference On Multidisciplinary Approaches To Nutritional Problems Symposium On Diabetes And Health

Nutrition Interventions For The Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes: Conference On Multidisciplinary Approaches To Nutritional Problems Symposium On Diabetes And Health

This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef . Costa, BernardoCastell, ConxaCos, XavierSol, ClaustreMestre, SantiagoCanela, MartaBoquet, AntoniCabr, Joan-JosepBarrio, FranciscoFlores-Mateo, GemmaFerrer-Vidal, DanielandLindstrm, Jaana2016.Rationale and design of the DP-TRANSFERS project: diabetes prevention-transferring findings from European research to society in Catalonia.Journal of Translational Medicine,Vol. 14,Issue. 1, Derakhshan, RezaArababadi, Mohammad KazemiAhmadi, ZahraKarimabad, Mojgan NorooziSalehabadi, Vajihe AkbarpourAbedinzadeh, MehdiKhorramdelazad, HosseinBalaei, ParisaKennedy, DerekandHassanshahi, Gholamhossein2012.Increased Circulating Levels of SDF-1 (CXCL12) in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Are Correlated to Disease State but Are Unrelated to Polymorphism of the SDF-1 Gene in the Iranian Population.Inflammation,Vol. 35,Issue. 3,p.900. View all Google Scholar citations for this article. Nutrition interventions for the prevention of type 2 diabetes: Conference on Multidisciplinary approaches to nutritional problems Symposium on Diabetes and health MRC Sports Science Institute and Department of Human Biology Diabetes mellitus is escalating globally and it is predicted that 200 million individuals worldwide will have diabetes by 2010 and 300 million by 2025. However, there is compelling evidence from many studies that for subjects with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance the presentation of type 2 diabetes can be delayed by lifestyle modification. The aim of the present review is to present a summary of lifestyle modification interventions that have included a dietary component in their overall diabetes prevention programme. Medline, allied health literature and diabet Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Interventions For Patients With And At Risk For Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Free

Lifestyle Interventions For Patients With And At Risk For Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Free

Article, Author, and Disclosure Information Author, Article, and Disclosure Information From the University of Alberta Evidence-based Practice Center and Alberta Research Centre for Health Evidence, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this article are those of the authors, who are responsible for its content, and do not necessarily represent the views of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. No statement in this article should be construed as an official position of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Acknowledgment: The authors thank the following persons for their contributions: Carol Spooner (screening, data extraction, and research support), Tamara Durec (searching), Andrea Milne (searching), and Teodora Radisic (article retrieval). Grant Support: By the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (contract 290-2007-10021-I). Potential Conflicts of Interest: Mr. Vandermeer: Grant: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Dr. Korownyk: Grant: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. All other authors have no disclosures. Disclosures can also be viewed at www.acponline.org/authors/icmje/ConflictOfInterestForms.do?msNum=M13-0950 . Requests for Single Reprints: Christina Korownyk, MD, CCFP, Department of Family Medicine, 1706 College Plaza, 8215 112 Street, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2C8, Canada; e-mail, [email protected] . Current Author Addresses: Ms. Sumamo Schellenberg: Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 4-88D, University of Alberta, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1C9, Canada. Dr. Dryden: Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, 4-474, University of Alberta, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1C9, Canada. Mr. Van Continue reading >>

More in diabetes