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Type 2 Diabetes Injections Weight Loss

Diabetes Pill Might Replace Injection To Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes Pill Might Replace Injection To Control Blood Sugar

An injectable class of diabetes medication — called glucagon-like peptide-1 or GLP-1 — might one day be available in pill form, research suggests. Based on the results of a global phase 2 clinical trial, the study authors reported a significant drop in blood sugar levels for people on the oral medication, and no significant increase in low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) compared to a placebo over six months. The findings also showed that people taking the highest dose of the pill lost a large amount of weight — about 15 pounds — compared to a weight loss of fewer than 3 pounds for people on the inactive placebo pill. The research was funded by Novo Nordisk, the company that makes the drug, called oral semaglutide. "Semaglutide could transform diabetes treatment," said Dr. Robert Courgi, an endocrinologist at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y. "Glucagon-like peptide receptor agonists are agents that are highly recommended according to diabetes guidelines, but rarely used because they require injection. Most patients prefer a pill," Courgi explained. Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the clinical diabetes center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, agreed that these new findings were exciting. "This medication looks pretty good. The high dose matched the [injection] version. There was low hypoglycemia. It controls blood glucose. There was weight loss and it's not an injection. This is the same molecule that's been shown [as an injection] to decrease cardiovascular mortality," Zonszein said. "It has all the ingredients for an excellent medication. If this comes to market, it would be very good for people with type 2 diabetes," he added. Zonszein and Courgi were not involved in the current study. The study included just over 1,100 people with type 2 dia Continue reading >>

New Drug For Type 2 Diabetes Helps With Weight Loss

New Drug For Type 2 Diabetes Helps With Weight Loss

New drug for type 2 diabetes helps with weight loss A new once a day drug for type 2 diabetes which also helps patients lose weight and control blood pressure, has been launched in Britain. Victoza offers extra choice for people with type 2 diabetes which is one of the fastest growing diseases as the majority of cases are linked to obesity. The drug, made by Novo Nordisk, is a once a day injection and reduces the likelihood of hypoglycaemic attacks, when blood sugar levels fall too low. It works to stimulate insulin only when blood sugar levels rise too high and can be taken regardless of meals. Victoza, also known as liraglutide, helps patients to lose weight which is a major problem with type 2 diabetes because the disease is linked to obesity in many cases and the traditional drugs used to control it often encourage more weight gain. It helps the patient to feel fuller for longer and so reduces calorie intake. It costs 78.48 per patient per month. Professor Anthony Barnett, Professor of Medicine and Consultant Physician and Clinical Director of Diabetes and Endocrinology at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, said: "With Victoza patients with type 2 diabetes can be confident they are controlling their blood sugar, and may benefit from weight loss. This is an important advance for patients with type 2 diabetes, many of whom are already overweight. "Additionally, the once-daily formula, independent of meals, should improve patient compliance and in turn clinical outcomes." There are around 2.5m people in Britain with diabetes, including type 1 which is not linked to obesity, and about 500,000 people do not know they have the condition. Cathy Moulton, Care Advisor at Diabetes UK, said: "Liraglutide widens the choice of treatments for people with Type 2 d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Injection Helps Obese People Lose Weight And Keep It Off

Diabetes Drug Injection Helps Obese People Lose Weight And Keep It Off

Alamy Published: July 01, 2015 05:27pm ET on LiveScience. The diabetes drug liraglutide can help obese people who don’t have diabetes lose weight and keep it off, new findings confirm. Researchers found that 63 percent of study participants given liraglutide for 56 weeks lost at least 5 percent of their body weight — the amount experts agree is needed to make a difference in obesity-related health problems — whereas just 27 percent of the placebo group lost that much. “It is a very effective drug. It seems to be as good as any of the others on the market, so it adds another possibility for doctors to treat patients who are having trouble either losing weight or maintaining weight loss once they get the weight off,” said Dr. Xavier Pi-Sunyer, a professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and first author of the new study published today (July 1) in the New England Journal of Medicine. The company Novo Nordisk, the maker of liraglutide, funded the research. Liraglutide has been available in the United States for treating people with diabetes since 2010. The drug mimics a naturally occurring hormone called glucagon-like peptide-1, which is released in the human intestine and reduces hunger, increases satiety and slows the rate at which the stomach empties its contents into the small intestine. The Food and Drug Administration approved liraglutide (at a higher dose than is used for diabetes) for treating obesity in December 2014. In the new study, Pi-Sunyer and his colleagues randomly assigned 3,731 men and women with a body mass index of at least 30, or a BMI of at least 27 if they also had high cholesterol or high blood pressure, to receive a 3.0-milligram dose of liraglutide daily, or a placebo shot. Study participants also rec Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Ozempic, A Powerful Once-weekly Type 2 Diabetes Medication

Fda Approves Ozempic, A Powerful Once-weekly Type 2 Diabetes Medication

By Ben Pallant and Payal Marathe US Launch Expected in Early 2018; weight loss, major A1c reduction, and the convenience of a once-weekly injection in this new GLP-1 agonist The FDA has approved the once-weekly injectable Ozempic (semaglutide) for use in type 2 diabetes. Ozempic, a GLP-1 agonist, demonstrated significant A1c reductions (nearly 2%!) as well as weight loss in clinical trials. Though the approval was anticipated following a unanimous vote in favor of approval by an FDA advisory committee in October, it happened faster than expected. Ozempic will be available in the US within the first three months of 2018. The one concern that came up during the FDA approval process was a slightly higher rate of retinopathy (eye damage) observed in Ozempic users in one clinical trial – 3% of Ozempic users experienced retinopathy compared to 1.8% of those taking placebo. The FDA addressed this by including a warning on Ozempic’s label about this risk, especially when first starting the drug. The slightly higher retinopathy risk may be linked to very rapid reductions in A1c when starting the medication. Many insulins feature a similar warning. This warning is especially relevant for people who already have some history of retinopathy prior to starting Ozempic. Ozempic is now the fourth once-weekly injectable GLP-1 agonist to be approved in the US, joining Trulicity (dulaglutide), Bydureon (exenatide), and soon-to-be discontinued Tanzeum (albiglutide). In a recently-reported “head-to-head” trial, Ozempic showed greater A1c reduction than Trulicity (1.8% versus 1.4%) as well as greater weight loss (10-14 pounds versus 5-7 pounds). Ozempic had similarly shown greater A1c and weight reductions than Bydureon in an earlier trial. There are also once-daily GLP-1 agonists, V Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Trulicity, Once-weekly Injection For Type 2 Diabetes

Fda Approves Trulicity, Once-weekly Injection For Type 2 Diabetes

FDA Approves Trulicity, Once-Weekly Injection for Type 2 Diabetes FDA Approves Trulicity, Once-Weekly Injection for Type 2 Diabetes On Thursday the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Trulicity, by Eli Lilly and Company, a once weekly, injectable GLP-1 treatment for adults with Type 2 diabetes. We are delighted with the approval of Trulicity, the President of Lilly Diabetes Enrique Conterno said in a statement . Lilly now has treatment options in several classes of diabetes medications: orals, GLPs and insulin. Trulicity will help grow the GLP-1 receptor agonist class as a new choice for adults with Type 2 diabetes. GLP-1short for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonistsis a naturally occurring hormone released in the intestine that stimulates the release of insulin from pancreatic beta cells when carbohydrates are absorbed in the intestine. Additionally, GLP-1 is also present in the brain, where it acts as an appetite suppressant. Trulicity, which is the brand name for the drug dulaglutide, will be available later this year as an injectable treatment with a single-use pen that doesnt require mixing, or a needle attachment, the company said. It can be administered once a week, at any time of the day, regardless of mealtimes. Lilly recommends injecting Trulicity in the abdomen, the leg, or the upper arm. Dr. Sherry Martin, a senior medical director at Lilly who was involved in clinical trials for Trulicity, conceded that for Type 2 diabetics now treating their condition with oral medication, using an injectable drug could be a daunting change because it carries with it an increased burden of responsibility. But, she said, when patients were ready to transition to an injectable treatment, she believed Trulicity would prove a more appealing option than th Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Diabetes Drug That Also Helps With Weight Loss

Fda Approves Diabetes Drug That Also Helps With Weight Loss

TRENTON, N.J. — U.S. regulators on Tuesday approved a new diabetes drug that reduces blood sugar levels and also helps people lose significant weight. Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk said the Food and Drug Administration approved its once-a-week shot for people with Type 2 diabetes. The drug, Ozempic, also known as semaglutide, works by stimulating the body's own insulin production and reducing appetite. In one big company-funded study, Ozempic, on average, reduced long-term blood sugar levels at least 2 ½ times as much as a popular daily diabetes pill, Merck & Co.'s Januvia. It also helped study participants lose two to three times as much weight as those in the comparison group. Over 56 weeks, patients who got a lower dose of Ozempic lost an average of 9.5 pounds (4.3 kilograms) while those who got a higher dose lost 13.5 pounds (6.1 kilograms). The patients who took Januvia lost an average of 4 pounds (1.9 kilograms). The 1,200 study participants were also taking one or two standard diabetes medicines. Novo Nordisk, a leader in diabetes care, has also been testing the drug separately for weight loss alone. Many Type 2 diabetes patients are overweight or obese, and losing significant weight usually helps them reduce their blood sugar and better control their diabetes. Over time, too high sugar in the blood can damage multiple organs and weaken circulation. The new drug comes in injector pens and costs about the same as similar weekly drugs: $676 for a four- to six-week supply without insurance. Novo Nordisk already sells a similar once-a-day shot, Victoza. Ozempic will compete with other popular once-a-week drugs in the same class, including Eli Lilly and Co.'s Trulicity and AstraZeneca PLC's Bydureon, which don't produce as much weight loss. However, they all carry Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Drug May Help People With Obesity Lose Weight

New Diabetes Drug May Help People With Obesity Lose Weight

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! New diabetes drug may help people with obesity lose weight A compound that mimics a naturally occurring hormone that regulates appetite may help people who have obesity but not diabetes to lose weight, a new study suggests. A compound that mimics a naturally occurring hormone that regulates appetite may help people who have obesity but not diabetes to lose weight, a new study suggests. The research will be presented Sunday, March 18, at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. The compound, semaglutide, has a chemical structure that is very similar to the hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which regulates both insulin secretion and appetite. In December, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the semaglutide injection Ozempic as a once-weekly adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. "This randomized study of weight loss induced with semaglutide in people with obesity but without diabetes has shown the highest weight reductions yet seen for any pharmaceutical intervention," said lead author Patrick M. O'Neil, Ph.D., Director of the Weight Management Center and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, S.C. The new study included 957 participants, 35 percent of whom were male. All participants had a body mass index (BMI) of at least 30, but did not have diabetes. They were randomly assigned to seven different groups. Five groups received different doses of semaglutide (between 0.05 mg and 0.4 mg) via injection once daily; a sixth group received a placebo, and a seventh group received 3 mg of the diabetes drug liraglutide. All participants Continue reading >>

Need Help Taking Off Excess Weight And Keeping It Off?

Need Help Taking Off Excess Weight And Keeping It Off?

Saxenda® (liraglutide) injection 3 mg is an injectable prescription medicine that may help some adults with excess weight (BMI ≥27) who also have weight-related medical problems or obesity (BMI ≥30) lose weight and keep the weight off. Saxenda® should be used with a reduced-calorie meal plan and increased physical activity Saxenda® is not for the treatment of type 2 diabetes Saxenda® and Victoza® have the same active ingredient, liraglutide, and should not be used together Saxenda® should not be used with other GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines Saxenda® and insulin should not be used together It is not known if Saxenda® is safe and effective when taken with other prescription, over-the-counter, or herbal weight-loss products It is not known if Saxenda® changes your risk of heart problems or stroke or of death due to heart problems or stroke It is not known if Saxenda® can be used safely in people who have had pancreatitis It is not known if Saxenda® is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age. Saxenda® is not recommended for use in children Serious side effects may happen in people who take Saxenda®, including: Possible thyroid tumors, including cancer. Tell your health care professional if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer. In studies with rats and mice, Saxenda® and medicines that work like Saxenda® caused thyroid tumors, including thyroid cancer. It is not known if Saxenda® will cause thyroid tumors or a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in people. Do not use Saxenda® if you or any of your family have ever had MTC, or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome t Continue reading >>

How Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. An analysis published in The BMJ aims to let doctors and the public in on a little-known secret: Type 2 diabetes, in many cases, is curable. People can reverse their diabetes by losing about 33 pounds, say the authors of the new paper, despite popular belief that the diagnosis is always a permanent one. If more people were striving for this goal, and if more doctors were documenting instances of diabetes remission, complication rates and health-care costs could both be reduced dramatically, the authors say. The analysis is based on evidence from recent clinical trials. In one from 2011, people who were recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes returned their blood sugar levels to normal when they lost weight on a calorie-restrictive diet. In a 2016 follow-up study, people who had been diabetic for up to 10 years were able to reverse their condition when they lost about 33 pounds. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, is an author of both the new analysis and of those earlier trials. He says a person’s likelihood of remission from diabetes is greatest in the first five years after being diagnosed. Type 2 diabetes, he wrote in an email, is a disease “best avoided by avoiding the weight gain that drives it.” For people who do develop it, he believes that evidence-based weight-loss programs could help them achieve lasting remission. “Not all can do it, but they should all be given the chance with good support,” Lean writes. “Taking tablets or injections for life to reduce blood sugar is a poor second rate treatment.” Current guidelines for the managemen Continue reading >>

Victoza® Lowers Blood Sugar Levels

Victoza® Lowers Blood Sugar Levels

Victoza® helps lower A1C In medical studies, many people taking Victoza® were able to reach the American Diabetes Association's A1C goal of less than 7.0%. (The A1C test measures your average blood sugar level over the previous 2 to 3 months.) Victoza® helps lower blood sugar in as soon as 2 weeks, and has been shown to keep it down in a 2-year medical study. Victoza® 1.8 mg taken alone or in combination with other diabetes medications lowered A1C by 1.0 to 1.5%, on average, in medical studies. That's good to know, because even a 1% drop in A1C can be important in the management of type 2 diabetes. One of these studies compared Victoza® with Januvia®. In this study, Victoza® was found to lower A1C better than Januvia®. Although not a weight-loss product, patients on Victoza® also had greater weight loss than those taking Januvia®. More patients taking Victoza® had short-term nausea as well as headache, diarrhea, and vomiting. Nausea was temporary, and fewer patients reported it over time. Another study compared Victoza® with Byetta®. In this study, Victoza® was found to lower A1C better than Byetta® and helped more patients get to goal. Side effects such as nausea and diarrhea were similar with both medications. See how Victoza® compares with the diabetes pill Januvia® or the injectable medication Byetta®. ► Victoza® works in 3 ways to lower blood sugar levels Victoza® works like the hormone GLP-1 (7-37)a to: Slow food leaving your stomach Help prevent your liver from making too much sugar Help the pancreas produce more insulin when your blood sugar levels are high aGLP-1 (7-37) represents <20% of the total circulating GLP-1 produced by your body. While not a weight-loss product, Victoza® may help you lose some weight In clinical studies ranging f Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: New Biopolymer Injection May Offer Weeks Of Glucose Control

Type 2 Diabetes: New Biopolymer Injection May Offer Weeks Of Glucose Control

Keeping blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible is important for people with type 2 diabetes, as it lowers the risk of serious complications. However, despite a long list of treatment options, patients still struggle with glucose control, especially when working out meal-specific doses. Treatments that cut down on injections are seen as a way to overcome this problem. Now, in a paper in Nature Biomedical Engineering, scientists describe a new biopolymer injection that could potentially replace daily or weekly insulin shots with one that need only be given once or twice per month. Untreated diabetes results in high levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which in the long-term can lead to blindness, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke, and amputation of lower limbs. Diabetes arises because of a problem with insulin, which is a hormone that is made in the pancreas and which helps cells to absorb glucose so that they can use it for energy. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin, while in type 2 diabetes - which accounts for 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases - it cannot use it properly. Although the incidence of newly diagnosed diabetes is starting to drop in the United States, it is still a huge public health problem that affects more than 29 million people. In 2013, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggested that diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., and that more than a fifth of the country's healthcare costs are for people diagnosed with diabetes. In their study paper, biomedical engineers from Duke University in Durham, NC, explain that "despite the long list of treatment options," nearly half of type 2 diabetes cases in the U.S. "are not properly managed." The researchers suggest that one reason f Continue reading >>

Pills To Lose Weight For Type 2 Diabetes

Pills To Lose Weight For Type 2 Diabetes

Obesity is a known risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The reasons for this are complex but include insulin resistance -- a problem with how the body responds to insulin, the hormone that normally helps metabolize blood sugar for energy. Weight loss has been established as the main way to reduce insulin resistance in people with both obesity and diabetes. Over the years, various medications in pill and injection form have been released that aim to help with weight loss and can benefit those with T2DM. While these interventions may help some individuals, a healthy lifestyle consisting of a balanced diet and regular exercise is the best long-term solution for losing weight with diabetes. Diabetes Medications -- Pills Certain medications prescribed for diabetes have the additional benefit of helping people lose weight. However, they have not been recommended for use as weight-loss medications alone. One example is metformin (Glucophage), the most common pill used to treat T2DM. Metformin is a member of the biguanide class of drugs, which act in multiple ways to lower blood sugar levels. It is not clear exactly how metformin causes weight loss, but a study in the April 2012 "Diabetes Care" showed that people with diabetes who took metformin for two years lost an average of 2 to 3 kg. Low blood sugar and gastrointestinal upset are possible side effects of metformin. Diabetes Medications -- Injectables Other diabetes drugs that aid weight loss are only available in injectable form. Exanatide (Byetta) and liraglutide (Victoza) are members of the drug class called incretin mimetics, also known as GLP-1 agonists. They treat T2DM by stimulating the pancreas to release insulin, thereby lowering blood sugar. They promote weight loss by decreasing appetite and slowing Continue reading >>

Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs And Weight Loss

Byetta, Victoza, Bydureon: Diabetes Drugs And Weight Loss

Tell me about the diabetes drugs Byetta, Victoza and Bydureon. Can they really help people who have diabetes lose weight? Are there side effects? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon) and liraglutide (Victoza) are taken by injection, similar to insulin, but they're not insulin. These medications are in a class of drugs called incretin mimetics, which improve blood sugar control by mimicking the action of a hormone called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). Among other things, these drugs stimulate insulin secretion in response to rising blood sugar levels after a meal, which results in lowering of the blood sugar. Byetta, Bydureon and Victoza not only improve blood sugar control, but may also lead to weight loss. There are many proposed ways in which these medications cause weight loss. They appear to help suppress appetite. But the most prominent effect of these drugs is that they delay the movement of food from the stomach into the small intestine. As a result, you may feel "full" faster and longer, so you eat less. Byetta is injected twice daily, and Victoza is injected once a day. Bydureon, a newer formulation, is injected once a week. These drugs do have different effects and side effects to consider. Exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon). The most common side effect of exenatide is mild to moderate nausea, which improves with time in most people. Several cases of kidney problems, including kidney failure, have been reported in people who have taken exenatide. Rarely, exenatide may cause harmful inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Liraglutide (Victoza). Some studies have found that liraglutide reduces systolic blood pressure and triglycerides, in addition to improving blood sugar control. The most common side effects are headache, nausea and Continue reading >>

Injectable Diabetes Medicine Drives Down Weight, Too, Research Finds

Injectable Diabetes Medicine Drives Down Weight, Too, Research Finds

Injectable diabetes medicine drives down weight, too, research finds Liraglutide, approved in a lower dose as the diabetes medication Victoza, helped nondiabetic subjects lose more weight, along with diet and exercise, than those taking a placebo, according to new research. The injectable drug's cost and the fact that it may have to be taken long term could be issues. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times) medication liraglutide helped more than twice as many obese subjects in a clinical trial lose 5% of their body weight, and more than three times as many lose a tenth of their body weight, compared with subjects taking a placebo, according to new research. The drug also appeared to reduce dramatically the risk of developing type-2 diabetes among those taking it. Compared with subjects getting liraglutide, those getting a placebo medication were eight times likelier to be diagnosed with type-2 diabetes during the 12-month trial. The injectable drug, marketed as Saxenda and produced by Novo Nordisk, was approved last December by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration as a weight-loss drug, partly on the strength of the just-published clinical trial. At a lower dose of its active ingredient, liraglutide (1.8 milligrams vs. 3 millilgrams), Saxenda is marketed as Victoza, a diabetes medication. Saxenda is the fourth prescription medication to be approved for weight loss by the in the past three years. It joins the drugs Belviq (lorcaserin), Qsymia (a combination of phentermine and topiramate) and Contrave (a combination of naltrexone and bupropion) in the newly fortified arsenal of pharmaceuticals aimed at helping the nation's 78 million obese adults shed excess weight. In findings published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers recruited 3,371 subjects who Continue reading >>

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