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Type 2 Diabetes Horror Stories

Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey

Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey

Ideas based on my personal experiences in learning how to manage type 2 diabetes. I stress that I am a diabetic, not a doctor nor a dietician. I have no medical qualifications beyond my own experience. Nothing written here is intended as medical advice, and any ideas you may decide to use should be discussed first with your doctor. I do not control which ads are displayed by Google Ads nor do I endorse the products advertised. Ads claiming diabetes is curable or reversible should be ignored. This is an index page for the stories of others that I happen across on this journey. Stories that uplift me, or I learn from, or those I just found interesting and enjoyed reading. Maybe others will enjoy them as much as I. xita's Story When I was diagnosed my A1c was 10.4 I finally had another test and my new A1c is 5.1 I am so happy I needed to tell someone... When I started this journey nearly 8 months ago I weighed 256 pounds. I am now 193. Jennifer's Story Eight years ago today I was diagnosed with T2 diabetes. I was very afraid... Good Advice, Bad Advice - Nicky's Experience My doctor is adamant that I shouldn't test, and that I should base my diet on whole grains. OTOH, I have an A1c of 5.5% ... LuckyKat My name is Kathy and I am both a horror story and a diabetic survivor.Let me start with my family history. My mother was a Type 1.5 diabetic. My Father is a type 2 diabetic. My brother is a type 2 diabetic. Me --I am a type 2 Inspiration nanna2six' story. When I was diagnosed in April 2008, I wasn't sure where to start. I went in for my annual exam, on a Friday, on the following Tuesday the nurse called and said I needed to repeat my glucose test because it was a "little high". I said how high? She said 289. Lisa's Story My story begins like most of us: hearing that my fast Continue reading >>

Just Found Out Type 2 Diabetes Shock To The System

Just Found Out Type 2 Diabetes Shock To The System

just found out type 2 diabetes shock to the system just found out type 2 diabetes shock to the system i am 46 years old not sriously overweight 12tone7lbs shocked to be told by doctor that i havetype 2 diabetes on metfomin . worried about what type and correct foods to eat .haering horror stories about illness I was diaganosed at age 57 and I weighed 148, I'm not sure what a stone is. I now weight 121 because I eat very low carb. I found through testing that my body doesn't metabolise carbs very well, no matter what the source. I have had to give up most fruit, except for tiny portions, rice, even brown rice, pasta, breads, potatoes and all wheat and grain products. It sounds severe but it is much easier on my system and doesn't require my pancreas to crank out insulin. I'm glad you found DD. Welcome D.D. Family T2 dx 3/07, tx w/very lo carb D&E Met, bolus R Hi, bluebird. Welcome. I wasn't terribly overweight when diagnosed at 37 either. The horror stories are good if they serve to motivate you to keep on top of your diabetes management. They are also good because keeping control of your sugars means that you will likely have very little risk of ever becoming the person in those stories. Glad you found us and feel free to ask questions. 'Veni, Vidi, Velcro' - I came, I saw, I stuck around. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control i am 46 years old not sriously overweight 12tone7lbs shocked to be told by doctor that i havetype 2 diabetes on metfomin . worried about what type and correct foods to eat .haering horror stories about illness Welcome to DD here is a thing you will hear here, type 2 diabetes isnt just about weight. My mom and two aunts were under 100 lbs so very thin yet they were and are type 2. Several things have happened in the last 50 yrs food manufactu Continue reading >>

8 Things I Wish People Understood About Having Type 1 Diabetes

8 Things I Wish People Understood About Having Type 1 Diabetes

I was 25 and in the middle of my second year of law school when I started feeling tired, thirsty, and hungry. I had blurry vision all the time. I was lucky — I mentioned this to a friend, and she said whenever she complained about her eyes her dad tested her blood sugar, because that's how he got diagnosed with diabetes. I had a family history of both types, but I figured I was too old for Type 1 and too young and too much of a gym rat for Type 2. Still, I went to student health. I explained my typical diabetes symptoms and family history to a person we will call "Helpful Nurse." Helpful Nurse decided the best immediate course of action would be to gaslight me aggressively in the five minutes it took to get the results back on my sugar test. "We don't usually get people in here 'thinking' they have 'diabetes.'" Cool story. "See, your vision isn't that bad." It's usually 20/19. "I'm sure you're just stressed about finals." Yeah, especially since I've spent most of the semester unconscious. That's when we heard someone scream from the lab down the hall and around a corner, "Don't let her leave." The equipment in student health had a limited range. My test didn't generate a number. It just said "high." "High" means it was at least six times normal. No, my life isn't over. It's a pain in the ass, it's terrifying, but the treatments will on average get me through the day. I was waiting for a friend to take me to the ER when Helpful Nurse started talking about high- risk pregnancy and "not dying the way my grandmother died." Pregnancy? I have exams in a month. And I watched my T1 grandmother die. Thanks, Helpful Nurse, you can go now. Of course this was a Friday. I spent the weekend eating nothing but tofu and zucchini with my sugar camped at three or four times normal, and Continue reading >>

A Rant On The Sad Reality That Is Often Type 2 Diabetes : Fatpeoplestories

A Rant On The Sad Reality That Is Often Type 2 Diabetes : Fatpeoplestories

I have posted here in the past with a horror story from nursing school , but I wanted to contribute something a little less colorful and perhaps a lot more tragic. Im a nurse who primarily works within the environment of the operating room, so I very rarely care for obese patients these days, but the one thing that may be more common than MRSA in the hospital is the diabetic patient. When I was working the nursing floor, I saw type 2 diabetic patients left and right, and some never ceased to leave me in complete, utter awe at their propensity for killing themselves. Before I explain, let me tell you all a bit about type 2 diabetes. One of the greatest complications we see with long-term diabetes is vascular trouble. This refers to the blood vessels and the heart, and can encompass anything from atherosclerosis to peripheral vascular disease to cerebrovascular disease. Additionally, we see a lot of retinopathy (changes in the blood vessels in the retina that potentially lead to blindness) and nephropathy (changes in the blood vessels within the kidney that often lead to end-stage kidney disease). I would also like to point out that type 2 diabetes is very largely preventable with lifestyle changes, and the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group and several other reputable sources back this claim with peer-reviewed evidence. A huge risk factor for the development of diabetes is having a BMI greater than 30, and a combination of weight reduction, exercise, and proper diet can completely delay and even completely prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes in high risk patients. Despite this, I cannot tell you how many type 2 diabetic patients I have watched willingly kill themselves because they don't want to make the lifestyle changes necessary to manage their condition. No Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Personal Story - Watch Webmd Video

Diabetes Type 2 Personal Story - Watch Webmd Video

Narrator: Jeff Howard begins his day like most of us...with coffee and breakfast. But like more and more Americans, there's something he has to check before he can eat-- his blood sugar. Jeff has Type Two diabetes. His body has trouble using insulin, a hormone that controls blood sugar. With the rise of obesity in America, Type Two diabetes is becoming a national epidemic. The CDC says 21 million Americans have it, another 41 million are at risk. Left unchecked, it can be fatal. Managed properly, it can be controlled. Jeff Howard : If a diabetic will learn--if they will just get the right encouragement-- the dietary planning and exercise program that they have may very well cause them to live longer and healthier lives than they would have if they'd never had diabetes. Narrator: Jeff was diagnosed at age 40. But instead of focusing on his disease, he ignored it. After all, he didn't feel sick... Jeff Howard : I tended to think I was bullet proof and invisible and those people who had complications from diabetes were somebody else. Narrator: Over the last twenty years, Jeff has watched his body slowly disintegrate. Circulatory problems have cost him part of his vision, and caused nerve and bony damage to his left foot... Narrator: And he's concerned about his heartmore than two thirds of people with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke. Jeff Howard : It is an insidious disease that quietly consumes the human body to the point where you can't walk, can't see, can't function and ultimately can't live. So pay attention. Learn everything you can. Get some help and some support. But do it early on when you first discover you're a diabetic, before the damage insidiously takes over and it gets to the point where it's too late. Narrator: Jeff hopes it is not too late. Learn Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Horror Stories Vs. Happy Endings Blood Sugar Trampoline

Diabetes - Horror Stories Vs. Happy Endings Blood Sugar Trampoline

Media attention is a good way to create more awareness about diabetes in the general public. So when I learned that RTE 1 was airing a programme dedicated to the disease I thought great! I quickly changed my mind when I read the programme synopsis in advance of viewing it. We were going to hear the stories of 3 people, one of whom had passed away since filming from diabetes complications, the second was visually impaired and had limb amputations and the third was only a couple of years diagnosed. I thought to myself its going to be grim and depressing and decided I was going to be disappointed with the programme. I really didnt want to watch other peoples misery and think that it could one day be me. Now that I have watched it and heard all of the stories, I heard the message. To me it was loud and clear, take care of your diabetes or else you will end up like those in the programme. I asked myself would I have heard that message from someone who seems to have good management of their diabetes, who didnt have any of the long term complications, or was young, fit and vibrant? So, yes we would like to see more inspirational people with diabetes who have good stories to tell us but we also need reminders of what can happen if we choose to ignore our diabetes. Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Mythsbusted!

10 Diabetes Mythsbusted!

Im a mom of two young boys and the founder of the Life Coaching organization Be You Only Betterand a type 1 diabetic. I consider myself an expert in all three areas, with more than 10,000 hours of rich experience in each. I thrive off the challenges and successes each brings my way. I live and breathe my expertise in all three areas. My passion as a Life Coach and my dedication as a mom are obvious. But diabetes? Really? Yes, I live and breathe that too, and I love the positive attributes that 20 years of diabetes has bestowed upon me. This autoimmune disease isnt always the easiest thing to manage, yet its given me strength beyond anything I could have imagined. It has inspired me be as healthy as possible, to try new things, to never accept failure and to believe that if I can handle diabetes, I can pretty much handle anything that comes my way. There is a sunnier, less serious side to diabetes that I like to share, and even poke some fun at it. After all, I have received some 172,000 pokes in the form of injections and finger pricks in my lifetime. Its high time to poke back. Diabetes is surrounded by myths and misconceptions that can create a picture full of stereotypes and stigma. Here are the top 10 truths that non-diabetic people should know about us sugary sweet ones. 1. Yes, it hurts. Its a needle going into my fleshwhat did you think? They say a stupid question deserves a stupid answer, or is it that there is no such thing as a stupid question? Either way, asking if a needle hurts when you plunge it into your skin is like asking me if I want a martini. Duh. 2. No, my diabetes wont go away. And you cant cure it with vitamins or supplements. By the time someone is diagnosed with diabetes, that person has lost a major portion of his or her beta cell function. Un Continue reading >>

Horror Stories From The Hospital Bed

Horror Stories From The Hospital Bed

Dinner is at 5, but you usually eat at 7. Your attending doctor does not do the same things as you and your diabetes team. Your attending doctor knows you have a diabetes specialist but does not call the specialist. You routinely eat a bedtime snack, but nobody in the hospital brings you one. The insulin you use is Humalog, but it is not on the formulary. Neither is your ACE inhibitor. These are just a few of the problems that come with being a person with diabetes who has to stay in the hospital. Protect Yourself Participate in the Management of Your Diabetes "I have a lot of patients go to the hospital and know something is wrong, but rely on their providers, who may not know as much," says Dr. Reza Rofougaran, an endocrinologist in Terre Haute, Indiana. "If you go to the hospital, you have to participate in the management of your diabetes." Lynne Ryan of Culleoka, Tennessee, knows the benefits of participating in her own diabetes management while being hospital bound. Two years ago, she sailed through surgery and a hospital stay with her diabetes well under control. How? By having her admitting physician write orders that she was to 1) leave her pump in place, 2) decide on the amounts of insulin to take 3) check her own blood sugar. She followed that by communicating her situation and her needs to the staff. "From the minute I woke up in recovery to the time I went home, the staff allowed me to check [my blood-glucose levels] and bolus what I wanted and when I wanted," Ryan says. "I did use their meters because, as a nurse myself, I understand the controls they have to do. But I used my lancets and device because they have the old ones that hurt. The hardest thing was knowing what to bolus, as I did not get a menu to choose from and I use Velosulin. All in all, it w Continue reading >>

Scary Diabetic Hospital Stories

Scary Diabetic Hospital Stories

Hospital Room from Crestock Creative Photos Ive been in the hospitalfour times since being diagnosed diabetic (15 years ago). Oncefor accidentally giving humalog instead of lantus insulin, amemorablestory you can read here . Another time 4 years ago because of kidney stones, anothermore recently for ruptured ovarian cysts,and lastly when I gave birth to my twins last June. Each time, I noticed something which frankly, bewildered me. The medical staff didnt know much about diabetes. The time I was in the hospital for my accidental insulin switcheroo I came in fully in control and explaining to the staff I would need intravenous glucose ASAP because even though I ingested a lot of sugar on the way to the hospital, I did the math and knew it wasnt enough. There seemed to be more focused on how I made the mistake. I was even asked if I was having a fight with my fianc or suicidal. When we got past that they decided they would check my blood sugar every hour. I instead checked it every 20 minutes. It is a good thing I did because each time my sugar waslow and coming down really fast. We would call the nurse and she would say something like, wow youre coming down quick! we need to give you more glucose! Atone point she pushed the glucose in my vein so quick something strange happened to my vein. It protrudes now and looks bumpy along the inside of my wrist and forearm. She said, oops, what did I do here? I thought, seriously??!! Thanks a lot! AnywayI dont like to think what would have happened to me had I not checked my sugar more frequently than they saw fit. The time I had kidney stones was scary, too. Not once did anyone care about what my glucose numbers were running. I was in there hours and it was as if I wasnt a diabetic. I had a procedure done to laser blast a huge s Continue reading >>

Residency Horror Stories Why Stories?

Residency Horror Stories Why Stories?

Ive started a Residency Horror Stories series. The point is not to get you nervous about your training or being on-call or anything like that In fact, its quite the opposite. Most people think they learn best through experience. Thats true, for the most part but theres another piece of experience that is even more important than the experience itself and thats the story. We remember things as stories. We further ingrain the memory by retelling that story. And each time we retell it, theres an opportunity to extract new insights from it and an opportunity for the listener to benefit from your story. Now some of the medical establishment (the Old Boys Network) may be a little upset with me for saying this, but the dry, factual version we often present on rounds is not always optimal. 49 year-old obese female with a history of type 2 diabetes and smoking who presented to the ER with severe chest pain, hypotension, and diaphoresis. Her EKG demonstrated 3mm ST segment elevation inferiorly. Cardiology was consulted and she was emergently taken to the cath lab. After a brief Vtach arrest requiring 260 Joules for return to sinus rhythm, her right coronary artery was successfully stented with two Taxus stents with good angiographic results. She was transferred to the CCU in stable condition with an intra-aortic balloon pump, IV heparin, Plavix, and aspirin. It was my first week as a second-year resident and I was on-call in the CCU. I was called stat to the ER for a CCU admission that was described as a 49 year-old obese female with a history of type 2 diabetes and smoking who presented to the ER with severe chest pain, shortness of breath, and diaphoresis. I was told that cardiology was consulted via phone & they recommended transfer to CCU after a VQ scan. I went to see the p Continue reading >>

5 Things Type 1 Diabetics Wish You’d Keep To Yourself

5 Things Type 1 Diabetics Wish You’d Keep To Yourself

Tuomas Marttila via Getty Images My name is Rachel. I’m young and healthy and energetic. I exercise daily, eat organic and vegetarian and believe in the magical powers of a good night’s sleep. I’m also a type 1 diabetic who has wrestled with my disease for nine years and counting. When new friends or acquaintances learn I’m diabetic, I’m met with one of five predictable responses. Unfortunately, none of these are helpful or encouraging. 1: Proclaim your fear of needles. I’ve heard, “I could never stick myself with a needle! Needles are so scary!” I’ve never been a big fan of needles myself. I mean really, who is? But when it comes down to life or death, literally, I’m positive you would be able muster enough courage to administer insulin. Certainly my disease is hardly comfortable, but it is my reality, sharp metal included. 2: Deem yourself captain of the Dietary Police. I might be at a holiday feast, at a party, or selecting what I want to eat at a restaurant when I’ll be asked, “Are you allowed to eat that?” Listen, I can eat anything I want. I’m a grown woman. There is no person in charge of my diet except for me. Of course, choosing to consume a lot of carbohydrates isn’t healthy for a diabetic, nor is it healthy for any person. I think sugar-free foods taste like chemicals, so instead I eat lower-sugar foods with the occasional all-out-dessert-fest. Please don’t attempt to go all IRS on me and audit my dietary choices. 3: Mention the word “control.” Type 1 diabetes is about as easy to control as a 4-year-old in a candy store. My disease begs for 24/7/365 management, but it’s hardly easy. Obvious factors, like how much activity I do, how much sleep I get and how many carbohydrates I consume can have a major impact on my blood s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hospital Horror Stories | Ask D'mine

Diabetes Hospital Horror Stories | Ask D'mine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Happy Saturday, and welcome back to our weekly advice column, Ask DMine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and educator W il Dubois . This week, Wil offers some thoughts to a scared D-peep who's in the hospital for unrelated health issues, but is getting resistance from hospital staff re: proper diabetes care. Sadly this is all too common... Here's what Wil has to say. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Scared in St. Lukes writes: Iam currently in the hospital for a recent hip surgery. I also have COPD, and becauseof my inability to move, my lungs are raspy. The doctor is giving meprednisone, and my blood sugars have been no less than 422 with off-the-chartreadings since 6 am this morning. Even after giving insulin, being tested everytwo hours, the lowest is 422 and they dont seem to be worried, but I am. The fearof ketoacidosisis constant... Are they not giving me enough insulin? [email protected] DMine answers: Theyre not giving you enough insulin.But youre in no danger of ketoacidosis, either. More on that in a sec, butfirst lets talk about prednisone . Its a steroid medication thats usedas an anti-inflammatory. Its awesome at helping people with breathing issueslike you, kicks butt in reducing arthritis flare-ups, reduces psoriasis, canrelieve back seizure, and more. Uh Quite a lot.It has a tendency to deliver a temporary knockout punch to the immune system,leaving you open for every opportunistic bug in the known universe. Plus thedrug has a rather long list of drug interactions and possible sideeffects. Chief among those side effects is the fact that prednisone can raiseblood sugar, eve Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease: A Fatal Link

Diabetes And Heart Disease: A Fatal Link

2 out of 3 people with type I or II diabetes will die from a heart attack or stroke Diabetics must watch their blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels Exercise, diet and not smoking also can help diabetics stay healthy Editor's note: Ann Curley is the assignment manager for the CNN Medical News unit and a type I diabetic. Your doctor can help you monitor blood sugar levels and cholesterol levels through a simple blood test. (CNN) -- Diabetes is the fifth-leading killer of Americans, according to the American Diabetes Association. A sobering two out of three people with type I or type II diabetes will die from a heart attack or stroke -- the combined leading causes of death among diabetics. There are few diabetics who haven't heard horror stories about patients who have lost limbs or gone blind because of poor disease control. Keeping a trio of factors -- blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels -- within recommended ranges is key to reducing the risk for diabetes-related complications such as heart attacks, strokes and peripheral vascular disease, which occurs when blood flow to the limbs is impaired. Health professionals often tell diabetics to mind their "ABCs." This is an important blood test, officially called glycolated hemoglobin, or HbA1C. The A1C test is a reading of the average blood glucose values for the past two or three months. A little science lesson: Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to all the body cells. When diabetes is uncontrolled, too much sugar, or glucose, is in the blood. The extra glucose enters the red blood cells and sticks to -- or glycates -- the hemoglobin. The more excess glucose, the more sugar that sticks to the hemoglobin. And these clumps of glucose and hemoglobin can be measured as Continue reading >>

Insurance Refused To Pay For My Daughters Type 1 Diagnosis

Insurance Refused To Pay For My Daughters Type 1 Diagnosis

Insurance Refused to Pay for My Daughters Type 1 Diagnosis A family finds itself on the hook for two nights in the hospital. My daughter Emily texted me from school one day and said her throat hurt. Strep had been going around, so I made an appointment at her pediatrician for the same day. Still, I knew she had been showing symptoms (frequent urination, weight loss, constant hunger) in recent weeks that might point to Type 1 diabetes; my brothers had had Type 1. Her strep test came back positive, and I mentioned the other symptoms to the doctor. They ran a urinalysis and then came back for a finger poke. Afterwards, the doctor came back in and told me they suspected diabetes and that we needed to go to the ER. We stayed in the hospital for two nights while my 12-year-old daughter, my husband, and I learned Diabetes 101. Emily was emotionally and physically exhausted, but feeling better with her blood sugar coming down. We went home and tried to adapt to the new normal of blood sugar management. A few weeks later, I got a statement from my insurance company saying I would have to pay the hospital over $15,000. They stated that Emilys hospital stay was not medically necessary. This was signed off by a doctor at the insurance company who had never seen Emily in person. Based on all the data from the hospital, he stated that she should have been sent home after her first shot of insulin since it had brought down her blood sugar. Reading this, I began to cry. I had been holding it together, but this bill just left me shattered. Did this insurance company have any idea what we were going through? I was living in constant fear of losing my daughter overnight, and now I owed over $15,000 for a two-night stay in a hospital room. After the initial shock wore off, I got very angr Continue reading >>

Charlotte: Five Diabetes Scary Misconceptions And How I Fight The Fear

Charlotte: Five Diabetes Scary Misconceptions And How I Fight The Fear

Charlotte: Five diabetes scary misconceptions and how I fight the fear Charlotte: Five diabetes scary misconceptions and how I fight the fear Charlotte is 28 years old and lives in London. She is training to be a professional wrestler. And has had Type 1 diabetes since she was three years old. She writes about the scary misconceptions she has heard around living with Type 1 and how she fights the fear. Living with Type 1 diabetes can be scary, but not half as scary as the things people say to you or tell you that youll never be able to do. Horror hypos, chilling complications, spooky self-management stress. The list goes on and on Scary story one: Intense physical activity isnt for people with Type 1 diabetes. The C-Bomb. My finishing move. A pop-up spine buster that demonstrates power and authority. This move is a metaphoric slap in the face to anyone who says that you cant play sport or exercise if you live with Type 1 diabetes. Its bone-crushing finale signals the end of the match, and the end of horror stories around physical activity and Type 1 diabetes. Scary story two: Stressful situations arent good for your blood glucose levels avoid at all costs. My response: The chronicle of anarchy in Camden On a dark autumn evening, the fog arose around Camden Lock, bringing with it some very mysterious entrants to the Halloween Battle Royal And, after living with Type 1 diabetes for 25 years, I made my real-world wrestling debut in front of 200 people at a packed-out Anarchy Pro Wrestling show in Lock 17, Camden. Scary storythree Youll definitely have some complications after 20 years of living with Type 1 diabetes. My response: The mythical madness of medicine You say complications, I say just another barrier to overcome. But this is undoubtedly a scary thing to hear in Continue reading >>

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