diabetestalk.net

Type 2 Diabetes Gender Statistics

Gender Play – The Relationship Between Gender And Diabetes

Gender Play – The Relationship Between Gender And Diabetes

In a recently published study, it was revealed that while death rates fell for men between the years 1971 to 2000 with diabetes, the rates for women with diabetes did not fluctuate. Men with diabetes live 7.5 years less than other men who do not have diabetes. This number increases to 8.2 years among women who have diabetes to those who do not.1 However, in a very different study, researchers at the University of Glasgow revealed that men are biologically more susceptible to getting diagnosed with type 2 diabetes than women.2 What do these studies mean? How can a male or a female prevent themselves from being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes? If you already have Type 2 diabetes, what can be learned from these studies in order to have a good diabetes management? Also, how does diabetes affect male versus female? In this article, we will look at some of the most prominent studies conducted in this area and ways of preventing/managing for an efficient diabetes management based on one’s gender. The earlier mentioned research from University of Glasgow indicates that men do not need to gain more weight than women to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. This means that women have to gain considerable weight and fat, compared to males, in order to have fat deposits that are linked with diabetes. While women store most of their fat in the thigh and hip area, men tend to store their fat mostly in the waist and in their liver. The results of this research were drawn from 51, 920 men and 43, 173 women in Scotland. The BMI for a diagnosis in diabetes in men was 31.83 compared to 33.69 in women. We are now aware of several factors that are at play for the increase in chances of getting Type 2 diabetes: lifestyle age ethnicity body weight obesity socioeconomic status. This study confir Continue reading >>

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

You’ve become the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal of medicine. A must-read every morning. ” Continue reading >>

Gender Differences In The Pathophysiology Of Diabetes: What Do We Know?

Gender Differences In The Pathophysiology Of Diabetes: What Do We Know?

This feature requires the newest version of Flash. You can download it here . Hi. I am Franck Mauvais-Jarvis, professor of medicine at Tulane University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans, Louisiana. This year at the American Diabetes Association 75th Scientific Sessions, I gave a talk[ 1 ] about the role of gender and sex hormones in diabetes. This is a very important topic because men and women have evolved different ways to store and use glucose; therefore, many aspects of the regulation of glucose homeostasis are different in men vs women. These differences have implications for the development of diabetes. For example, type 1 diabetes has a known gender dimorphism. More boys than girls develop type 1 diabetes, suggesting that the female hormones protect against type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes also has a sex dimorphism in the human population, and after menopause and the loss of estrogen production, more women than men have diabetes. Even the prediabetes syndromes differ by sex. For example, impaired fasting glucose is mostly observed in men, whereas impaired glucose tolerance is observed more in women. Thus, most of these differences are believed to be the consequence of the effect of male and female hormones after puberty. As mentioned, estrogen protects and maintains insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion, and helps the insulin-producing beta cell of the pancreas adapt to metabolic stresses. These effects are mediated via estrogen receptors. When women stop producing estrogen at menopause, they become predisposed to type 2 diabetes. In men, testosterone is converted into estrogen, which has an antidiabetic action on the estrogen receptors in men. Most effects of androgen in men result from the effect of testosterone on the androgen receptor, which enhance Continue reading >>

Differences By Sex In The Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus, Impaired Fasting Glycaemia And Impaired Glucose Tolerance In Sub-saharan Africa: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Differences By Sex In The Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus, Impaired Fasting Glycaemia And Impaired Glucose Tolerance In Sub-saharan Africa: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Esayas Haregot Hilawe a, Hiroshi Yatsuya b, Leo Kawaguchi a & Atsuko Aoyama a a. Department of Public Health and Health Systems, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, 466-8550, Japan. b. Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan. Correspondence to Esayas Haregot Hilawe (e-mail: [email protected]). Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2013;91:671-682D. doi: Introduction Increasing urbanization and the accompanying changes in lifestyle are leading to a burgeoning epidemic of chronic noncommunicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa.1,2 At the same time, the prevalence of many acute communicable diseases is decreasing.1,2 In consequence, the inhabitants of sub-Saharan Africa are generally living longer and this increasing longevity will result in a rise in the future incidence of noncommunicable diseases in the region.1–3 Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prominent noncommunicable diseases that are undermining the health of the people in sub-Saharan Africa and placing additional burdens on health systems that are often already strained.4,5 In 2011, 14.7 million adults in the African Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) were estimated to be living with diabetes mellitus.6 Of all of WHO’s regions, the African Region is expected to have the largest proportional increase (90.5%) in the number of adult diabetics by 2030.6 Sex-related differences in lifestyle may lead to differences in the risk of developing diabetes mellitus and, in consequence, to differences in the prevalence of this condition in women and men.3 However, the relationship between a known risk factor for diabetes mellitus – such as obesity – and the development of symptomatic diabetes mellitus may not be simple. For example, in m Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Differs For Men And Women

How Diabetes Differs For Men And Women

Although anyone can develop type 2 diabetes, your lifestyle, age and family history can put you at a higher risk. Common signs of diabetes include weight loss or gain, increased thirst, frequent urination or urinary tract infections, tingling or numb extremities, and feeling lethargic all the time. Symptoms can develop gradually and can be somewhat difficult to notice; most people find out they are diabetic when they’re visiting the doctor for a different reason altogether. The Facts about Diabetes and Gender Recently, studies have revealed some differences in the impact of diabetes on women versus men. Statistics show that 11 percent of women in the United States age 20 and older have diabetes, a number just slightly less than men. One of the major differences is how the disease is diagnosed. The signs of diabetes in men tend to be more recognizable, making it easier for men to get diagnosed earlier. Men tend to develop type 2 diabetes at a younger age and at a lower weight, which means they receive more aggressive treatment sooner for both diabetes and the potential heart health risks it can bring. Women tend to be further along in the disease when they are diagnosed, making them far more susceptible to complications. Some of the ways diabetes symptoms in women have a greater impact on overall health include: Heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women with diabetes. When a woman is diabetic, the risk for heart disease is six times higher than for women who do not have diabetes. Studies show that the risk of heart disease to women with diabetes is 50 percent higher than for men with diabetes. Hormonal problems. Women’s hormones can also affect the way they manage their diabetes; menopause can cause changes in blood sugar levels, and some Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Gender-disparities In Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: More Than A Quality Of Care Issue. A Cross-sectional Observational Study From The Amd Annals Initiative

Gender-disparities In Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: More Than A Quality Of Care Issue. A Cross-sectional Observational Study From The Amd Annals Initiative

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Gender-Disparities in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: More Than a Quality of Care Issue. A Cross-Sectional Observational Study from the AMD Annals Initiative Contributed equally to this work with: Valeria Manicardi, Giuseppina Russo, Angela Napoli, Elisabetta Torlone, Patrizia Li Volsi, Carlo Bruno Giorda, Nicoletta Musacchio, Antonio Nicolucci, Concetta Suraci, Giuseppe Lucisano, Maria Chiara Rossi Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Montecchio Hospital Local Health Authority of Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy Contributed equally to this work with: Valeria Manicardi, Giuseppina Russo, Angela Napoli, Elisabetta Torlone, Patrizia Li Volsi, Carlo Bruno Giorda, Nicoletta Musacchio, Antonio Nicolucci, Concetta Suraci, Giuseppe Lucisano, Maria Chiara Rossi Affiliation Department of clinical and experimental medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy Contributed equally to this work with: Valeria Manicardi, Giuseppina Russo, Angela Napoli, Elisabetta Torlone, Patrizia Li Volsi, Carlo Bruno Giorda, Nicoletta Musacchio, Antonio Nicolucci, Concetta Suraci, Giuseppe Lucisano, Maria Chiara Rossi Affiliation Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, S. Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy Contributed equally to this work with: Valeria Manicardi, Giuseppina Russo, Angela Napoli, Elisabetta Torlone, Patrizia Li Volsi, Carlo Bruno Giorda, Nicoletta Musacchio, Antonio Nicolucci, Concetta Suraci, Giuseppe Lucisano, Maria Chiara Rossi Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrinology and Metabolism, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia, Italy Contributed equally to this work with Continue reading >>

Gender Differences In The Relationship Between Diabetes Process Of Care Indicators And Cardiovascular Outcomes

Gender Differences In The Relationship Between Diabetes Process Of Care Indicators And Cardiovascular Outcomes

Gender differences in the relationship between diabetes process of care indicators and cardiovascular outcomes 1 Laboratorio Management e Sanit, Istituto di Management, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy Search for other works by this author on: 2 Agenzia Regionale Sanit, Regione Toscana, Florence, Italy Search for other works by this author on: 2 Agenzia Regionale Sanit, Regione Toscana, Florence, Italy Search for other works by this author on: 2 Agenzia Regionale Sanit, Regione Toscana, Florence, Italy 3 Centre of Study for Gender Health, Azienda USL 3, Pistoia, Italy Search for other works by this author on: European Journal of Public Health, Volume 26, Issue 2, 1 April 2016, Pages 219224, Chiara Seghieri, Laura Policardo, Paolo Francesconi, Giuseppe Seghieri; Gender differences in the relationship between diabetes process of care indicators and cardiovascular outcomes, European Journal of Public Health, Volume 26, Issue 2, 1 April 2016, Pages 219224, Background: Adherence to recommended guidelines in the care for diabetes has been demonstrated to significantly prevent the excess risk of hospitalization and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Aim of this study was to evaluate whether adherence to a standardized process quality-of-care-indicator in diabetes, is able to predict, equally in men and women, first hospitalization or mortality risk after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), ischemic stroke (IS), congestive heart failure (CHF), lower extremity amputations (LEA) or any of above major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Methods: Guideline composite indicator (GCI), a process indicator including one annual assessment of HbA1c and at least two among eye examination, serum lipids measurement and microalbuminuria, was measured in the year 2006 in 91 826 ( Continue reading >>

Gender-specific Epidemiology Of Diabetes: A Representative Cross-sectional Study

Gender-specific Epidemiology Of Diabetes: A Representative Cross-sectional Study

International Journal for Equity in Health The North West Adelaide Health Study Team International Journal for Equity in HealthThe official journal of the International Society for Equity in Health20098:6 Grant et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2009 Diabetes and its associated complications are part of a chronic disease global epidemic that presents a public health challenge. Epidemiologists examining health differences between men and women are being challenged to recognise the biological and social constructions behind the terms 'sex' and/or 'gender', together with social epidemiology principles and the life course approach. This paper examines the epidemiology of a population with diabetes from the north-west metropolitan region of South Australia. Data were used from a sub-population with diabetes (n = 263), from 4060 adults aged 18 years and over living in the north-west suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia. Eligible respondents were asked to participate in a telephone interview, a self-report questionnaire and a biomedical examination. Diabetes (undiagnosed and diagnosed) was determined using self-reported information and a fasting blood test administered to participants. Data were analysed using SPSS (Version 10.0) and EpiInfo (Version 6.0). Factors associated with diabetes for both men and women were being aged 40 years and over, and having a low gross annual household income, obesity and a family history of diabetes. In addition, being an ex-smoker and having low cholesterol levels were associated with diabetes among men. Among women, having a high waist-hip ratio, high blood pressure and reporting a previous cardiovascular event or mental health problem were associated with diabetes. The results found that men and women with diabetes face different challenge Continue reading >>

Healthcare | Free Full-text | Socioeconomic Status And Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes; Race By Gender Differences | Html

Healthcare | Free Full-text | Socioeconomic Status And Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes; Race By Gender Differences | Html

Healthcare 2017, 5(4), 83; doi: 10.3390/healthcare5040083 Socioeconomic Status and Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes; Race by Gender Differences , Maryam Moghani Lankarani 2, John D. Piette 3,4 and James E. Aikens 5 Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA VA Center for Clinical Management Research, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, USA Correspondence: Tel.: +1-734-232-0445; Fax: +1-734-615-8739 Academic Editor: Sampath Parthasarathy Received: 11 August 2017 / Accepted: 6 October 2017 / Published: 1 November 2017 Background: This study aimed to investigate differences in the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) across race by gender groups. Methods: Using a convenient sampling strategy, participants were 112 patients with type 2 DM who were prescribed insulin (ns = 38 Black women, 34 Black men, 14 White women, and 26 White men, respectively). Linear regression was used to test the associations between sociodemographic variables (race, gender, SES, governmental insurance) and Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in the pooled sample and within subgroups defined by race and gender. Results: In the pooled sample, neither SES nor governmental insurance were associated with HbA1c. However, the race by gender interaction approached statistical significance (B = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.243.00, p =0.094), suggesting higher HbA1c in Black women, compared to other race by gender groups. Continue reading >>

Men At Higher Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Men At Higher Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

More than 100 million people worldwide have Type 2 diabetes, and in many parts of the world, men have higher rates of the condition than women. A recent study from the University of Glasgow in Scotland suggests a possible explanation for this: Men may be “biologically more susceptible” to the condition. In Type 2 diabetes, high blood glucose is caused mainly by a combination of two factors: insulin resistance, a condition in which the body does not use insulin efficiently, and insufficient insulin secretion by the pancreas. A variety of factors increase the risk of developing Type 2, such as being overweight or obese, storing fat in the abdomen (as opposed to in the hips or thighs), and being physically inactive. Age, race, family history, and a personal history of gestational diabetes or prediabetes also contribute to a person’s risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. To determine whether men and women develop diabetes at different average body-mass index (BMI, a measure of a person’s weight in relation to his height) levels, researchers from the university analyzed data from 43,137 women and 51,920 men with Type 2. They compared the participants’ BMI levels (recorded within one year of diagnosis) and also took into account other factors such as age and smoking rates. The data showed that the average BMI at diagnosis was 31.83 among men but 33.69 among women. The difference was most pronounced at younger ages. According to lead study author Naveed Sattar, MD, PhD, “Previous research has indicated that middle-aged men are at a higher risk of developing diabetes than women and one possible explanation is that men have to gain less weight than women to develop the condition. In other words, men appear to be at higher risk for diabetes.” Fat distribution may expl Continue reading >>

Diabetes In India Rising, With Women At A Particular Disadvantage

Diabetes In India Rising, With Women At A Particular Disadvantage

KS Harikrishnan IPS, part of the Guardian development network The disease itself may not discriminate on the basis of gender, but when it comes to healthcare for patients with diabetes, women in India find themselves at a disadvantage compared with men. This is the conclusion of a study, Impact of Gender on Care of Type 2 Diabetes in Varkala, Kerala, which analysed gender roles, norms and values in a household and found women patients to be more vulnerable. This vulnerability influences all phases of diabetic care, according to the paper by Dr Mini P Mani at the Achutha Menon Centre for Health Science Studies (AMCHSS) in Thiruvananthapuram, the capital of the southern state of Kerala. Even when they suffer from diabetes, women cannot abandon the "caretaker role" in the family and have to continue to prioritise the health of other family members above their own, the study found. Inequitable access to resources prevents early diagnosis of the disease in women. Women pay more attention to the health of the men and children in the family, leaving them with less time to devote to their own wellbeing, said Rosy Raphy, who teaches at a school in Munambam, near the central Kerala town of Kochi. "As someone who has lived with diabetes for 26 years," Raphy told IPS, "I can say that I was not aware of the disease and did not take due care because I was preoccupied with matters of the family. As a result, my case got aggravated." Of particular concern to women and gynaecologists in the country is gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a form of the disease that affects pregnant women. The incidence of GDM has grown fourfold in the past 10 years, according to Dr B Rajkumar, a doctor of Indian systems of medicine at the Keezhariyoor government ayurveda dispensary in the state's norther Continue reading >>

Middle-aged Men Twice As Likely To Have Diabetes As Women

Middle-aged Men Twice As Likely To Have Diabetes As Women

Middle-aged men twice as likely to have diabetes as women Middle-aged men twice as likely to have diabetes as women Men aged 35-54 are almost twice as likely to have diabetes compared to their female counterparts, reveals our new report 'Diabetes in the UK 2009', out today. Key statistics on diabetes shows that 2.4 per cent (around 92,960) of men in England aged 35-44 have diabetes compared to 1.2 per cent (around 47,000) of women of the same age, and 6 per cent (around 197,050) of men aged 45-54 have diabetes compared to 3.6 per cent (around 120,670) of women their age. Statistics also show that diabetes has risen four times faster in men aged 35-44 over the last 12 years compared to women of the same age, and that, consistently, more men are overweight than women. Approximately 90 per cent of people with diabetes have Type 2 diabetes, which is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as diet and physical activity levels. The condition can be genetic, but many people are overweight when they are diagnosed. Simon ONeill, Diabetes UKs Director of Care, Information and Advocacy, said: Its very worrying that men of this age are developing diabetes at such an alarming rate compared to their female counterparts. Most of them will have Type 2 diabetes, which is genetic but is alsostrongly linked to lifestyle and can be prevented in many cases by eating a healthy balanced diet and doing regular physical activity. Women should not rest on their laurels, either. They may tend to develop the condition later in life, but the risk of death from heart disease associated with Type 2 diabetes is about 50 per cent greater in women than it is in men not a statistic to be ignored. Diabetes UK is calling on everyone carrying extra weight to reduce their chances of developing Type 2 diab Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

Gender And T2dm - Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus - Diapedia, The Living Textbook Of Diabetes

Gender And T2dm - Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus - Diapedia, The Living Textbook Of Diabetes

In the first half of the last century the prevalence of type 2 diabetes was higher among women than among men, but this trend has shifted, so more men than women are now diagnosed with type 2 diabetes . This change in the gender distribution of type 2 diabetes is mainly caused by a more sedentary lifestyle particularly among men, resulting in increased obesity. However, recent data have also shown that men develop diabetes at a lower degree of obesity than women a finding which adds support to the view that the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes differs between men and women. Observations of sex differences in body fat distribution, insulin resistance, sex hormones, and blood glucose levels further support this notion. Figure 1: Cross-sectional abdominal magnetic resonance image of an obese woman and an obese man [1]. Obesity is one of the main risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and especially the abdominal visceral fat is associated with increased type 2 diabetes risk. Body fat distribution differs by sex [1] , and in general men have more abdominal fat, whereas women have more peripheral fat also denoted as apple versus pear shape. Looking into the abdominal fat, men also tend to have more visceral and hepatic fat than women, whereas women have more subcutaneous fat than men (Figure 1). In contrast to visceral fat, subcutaneous fat is associated with improved insulin sensitivity and is therefore protective against type 2 diabetes. Thus, the phenomenon that men develop diabetes at a lower body mass index than women [2] can be explained by the fact that men have more visceral fat for a given body mass index than women and thereby a higher relative risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and blood glucose levels The sex differences in body fat distribution a Continue reading >>

More in diabetes