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Type 2 Diabetes Forum Australia

Type 2 Diabetes - Visa Chat - Moving To Australia - Pomsinoz Forum

Type 2 Diabetes - Visa Chat - Moving To Australia - Pomsinoz Forum

Hi can anyone help me I need some advice. I have a sponsord visa and am on my way to Oz with hubby and three children in 16 days but I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a few days ago. I was hoping to apply for permanent residency in 2 years and am realy worried now that this will have an affect on our application as we were not intending on comming back to the Uk. Can anyone give me info on how this might affect us and do you need another medical for permanent visa application. Please don't worry, that should not be a problem for your visa, you will usually need to re-do meds for applying for PR but so many people have diabetes and it is no way near as serious as HIV/Aids/TB so hopefully it shouldn't be a problem, As long as it can be controlled you should be fine. Why not have a quick word with your agent who can probably reassure you more. If you are depressed you are living in the past. If you are anxious you are living in the future. If you are at peace you are living in the present. At the risk of sounding pedantic (& argumentative) I really feel I should point out that it is not really correct to compare HIV or TB with diabetes & conclude it is 'less serious'. Every day I see people with diabetes who have pretty serious medical problems related to their condition. In terms of mortality and morbidity, diabetes is a huge problem. It costs the health economy a small fortune every year. From a migration point of view, once your blood glucose control becomes established your risk of complications will dramatically reduce. I'm pretty sure it won't make any difference to your PR application. Try not to worry, & good luck with everything. At the risk of sounding pedantic (& argumentative) I really feel I should point out that it is not really correct to compare HIV or Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes

Managing Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a life-long condition but it doesn't have to be a life sentence. New technology, disease management options and research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes are all making progress. We're not there yet but there is hope for a cure. How can JDRF help? JDRF is dedicated to finding a cure for type 1 diabetes and its complications through the support of the best and most promising medical research. You can stay up to date on the latest type 1 diabetes research and get connected to the type 1 diabetes community, with our monthly type 1 diabetes newsletter. JDRF also offers a range of type 1 diabetes support programs and you can also chose to join us in the search for a cure by participating in one of our fundraising events. Remember, you are not alone - JDRF is here to help. Regular Health Checkups This is the part that most of us don't like thinking about - possible type 1 diabetes complications. Complications are associated with having higher than normal blood glucose levels over a long period of time. Look after yourself by having the following regular health check ups: HbA1c - every 3 months Blood pressure - every doctor's visit Cholesterol - every year Eyes - every one to two years Feet - every year Kidneys - every year Teeth and gums - regularly Medicare will cover the costs of five visits a year to allied health professionals (like dieticians and podiatrists). Talking it over Type 1 diabetes can sometimes seem like a full-time job! It can be incredibly hard and frustrating - especially when your results are not as great as you'd hoped. Because of this, many people experience ‘diabetes burnout'. They try to ignore the fact they have type 1 diabetes. It's important to know the signs of these conditions, and to realise that you're not alone. If you ne Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day Forum: Diabetes Does Not Have To Be A ‘life Sentence’

World Diabetes Day Forum: Diabetes Does Not Have To Be A ‘life Sentence’

A diabetes education expert will on Friday tell a diabetes forum that type 2 diabetes does not have to become a ‘life sentence.’ “My message at the ‘Living Well’ forum will be that with healthy diet, regular exercise and a good management plan, people with type 2 diabetes can lead a normal, active life,” said Michelle Darling, Diabetes Nurse at Latrobe Community Health Service. Latrobe Community Health Service is holding the forum on World Diabetes Day (Friday 14th November) from 10am – 1pm at their offices at 57 Buckley Street, Morwell. Anyone with type 2 diabetes – or who is at risk of diabetes – is welcome to attend. “About 5% of people in the Latrobe Valley have been told they have type 2 diabetes. Australia-wide, we are increasingly seeing young people with the disease too, which is worrying,” said Ms Darling. “In the years to come, managing diabetes will become a real burden on our region’s health system. Alongside care and advice for people with type 2 diabetes, we must also act to prevent people getting it in the first place.” As well as Ms Darling, a dietician, podiatrist, and exercise expert will all speak at the forum, providing practical advice and training on how to manage type 2 diabetes. “The foundations of managing diabetes are probably not surprising: eat well and exercise regularly. But we also want people to know there is support available. We have a network of experts who can work alongside you, and help you manage the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.” Bookings and enquiries can be made by calling Latrobe Community Health Service on 1800 242 696. Diabetes facts 280 Australians develop diabetes every day. Over 100,000 Australians have developed diabetes in the past year. Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic condition in Continue reading >>

Were For Sydney | Daily Telegraph

Were For Sydney | Daily Telegraph

To use this website, cookies must be enabled in your browser. To enable cookies, follow the instructions for your browser below. Facebook App: Open links in External Browser There is a specific issue with the Facebook in-app browser intermittently making requests to websites without cookies that had previously been set. This appears to be a defect in the browser which should be addressed soon. The simplest approach to avoid this problem is to continue to use the Facebook app but not use the in-app browser. This can be done through the following steps: Open the settings menu by clicking the hamburger menu in the top right Turn on the option Links Open Externally (This will use the devices default browser) Enabling Cookies in Internet Explorer 7, 8 & 9 Click Tools> Internet Options>Privacy>Advanced For First-party Cookies and Third-party Cookies click Accept Click Tools>Options>PrivacyOptions>Under the Hood>Content Settings Uncheck Block third-party cookies from being set Enabling Cookies in Mobile Safari (iPhone, iPad) Go to the Home screen by pressing the Home button or by unlocking your phone/iPad Select accept cookies from the safari menu. Select from visited from the accept cookies menu. Press the home button to return the the iPhone home screen. Select the Safari icon to return to Safari. Before the cookie settings change will take effect, Safari must restart. To restart Safari press and hold the Home button (for around five seconds) until the iPhone/iPad display goes blank and the home screen appears. Select the Safari icon to return to Safari. If you need to get in touch with us, please use the contact details below: Continue reading >>

Exposing Diabetes Forum To Help People Understand, Manage It

Exposing Diabetes Forum To Help People Understand, Manage It

EXPOsing diabetes forum to help people understand, manage it DIABETES Queensland is running an education forum EXPOsing diabetes in Hervey Bay on Saturday, February 16, to assist more than 1000 locals living with the condition. Hervey Bay is one of the state's diabetes hotspots - with rates of type 2 diabetes diagnosed in the city increasing by more than 41% since 2008. Type 2 diabetes is a major cause of avoidable hospitalisation in Queensland, above the flu and asthma. Diabetes Queensland Health Services Manager Andrea Sanders says EXPOsing diabetes offers the latest information on living well for people living with type 2 diabetes, including their supporters and carers. "People need every chance possible to understand and manage type 2 diabetes - the world's fastest growing chronic disease," Ms Sanders said. "We recognise that diabetes is a complex condition that doesn't disappear after diagnosis - people live with the burden of managing it for the rest of their life. "We're aiming with this education forum to set people on the right management course, and help them stay on it in the future. "It will challenge, explain, motivate and support people living with the condition to enjoy long and productive lives." Diabetes educators, dietitians, doctors, podiatrists and optometrists at EXPOsing diabetes will run attendees through a variety of sessions on blood glucose monitoring, healthy eating and exercise, foot and eye care, self management, goal setting and coping with diagnosis. Type 2 diabetes is known as a lifestyle condition which can be largely prevented or delayed through regular exercise, ensuring a nutritious diet and maintaining a healthy weight. Every day, 60 more Queenslanders are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, with prevalence rates expected to triple acro Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Glucose Self-monitoring

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Glucose Self-monitoring

Self-monitoring your blood glucose levels is not routinely recommended if you have type 2 diabetes and are not taking insulin or a sulfonylurea. Talk to your healthcare provider about reviewing your self-monitoring of blood glucose levels. Do you need to test? Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the body either cannot respond to insulin or cannot produce enough insulin to control glucose levels in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is associated with genetics and lifestyle factors (e.g. poor diet, obesity, physical inactivity). Blood glucose levels in people with diabetes are usually checked by your doctor four times per year, using a laboratory test called HbA1c, or a ‘finger prick’ test and a blood glucose monitor. Self-monitoring is when you check your blood glucose levels at home using the ‘finger prick’ test. If you have type 2 diabetes and are not taking insulin or a sulfonylurea, self-monitoring of your blood glucose levels is not routinely recommended. Research shows self-monitoring of blood glucose provides only slight improvement in control of type 2 diabetes, however general well-being or general health-related quality of life is not improved. Talk to your health professional about when self-monitoring might be of benefit, such as assessing low blood sugar. Whether you self-monitor your blood glucose or not, the following advice will help manage your diabetes. What can you do? Manage your weight Know your healthy weight and, if needed, develop a healthy eating and exercise plan to achieve those goals. Eat a healthy diet Maintain a balanced diet that includes a wide range of vegetables, moderate amounts of high-fibre carbohydrates that have a low glycaemic index (GI), lean cuts of meat and fish, low-fat dairy products, and small amounts of high fat and sugary Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Wish

Diabetes - Wish

WHO estimates that there are 347 million people worldwide (approx. 8.5 percent of the adult population) with diabetes and that by 2030 it will be the seventh leading cause of death. In 2004 an estimated 3.4 million died from the consequences of diabetes and over 80 percent of these deaths occurred in low-income and middle-income countries. Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are increasing. The common consequences of diabetes include damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys and nerves. The economic burden of diabetes is immense and in 2013 diabetes will take up 11 percent of worldwide health expenditure $548 billion. Type 2 diabetes can be prevented (or at least delayed) by a number of simple lifestyle changes: remaining physically active, eating healthily, and not smoking. In addition there are effective treatments for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, including insulin, other oral and injectable medicines, self-management support, blood pressure control and foot care. The Forum will make actionable recommendations to enable policymakers to more effectively prevent diabetes within their populations, and also to ensure effective treatment for those with the illness. Professor of Metabolic Health at the University of Sydney, Australia Stephen Colagiuri is the Professor of Metabolic Health and Director of Boden Institute for Obesity, Nutrition and Exercise at the University of Sydney. He is also Co-Director of the Boden Institutes World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Physical Activity, Nutrition and Obesity. His research interests focus on the development and implementation of evidence-based guidelines, cardiometabolic and vascular risk assessment, diabetes screening and prevention, the glycemic index, economic aspects of diabetes and obesity, and diabet Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed

Over 800,000 Australians have type 2 diabetes, but new research suggests 60% can reverse this condition. New studies have found the number of Australians diagnosed with all types of diabetes has trebled in the past 20 years and 800,000 of the 1.07 million cases are type 2. But Diabetes Australia estimates up to 60 per cent of type 2 cases can be prevented and new research shows 50 per cent of type 2 cases can be reversed. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, inactivity and poor diet. While it is well known that a healthy lifestyle can help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes, researchers are now saying switching to a plant-based, wholefood diet and taking up exercise can actually reverse the condition. Professor Wayne Dysinger, president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, who recently addressed the Australian Lifestyle Medicine Association conference in Sydney, says about half of the cases of type 2 diabetes that have been diagnosed could be totally reversed by lifestyle change alone. He says recent evidence from the US shows that after taking part in a 30-day intensive therapeutic lifestyle change program, close to 50 per cent of diabetics were no longer diabetic. "It definitely works for type 2 diabetes and for gestational diabetes," Dysinger says. "It helps with type 1 diabetes, but it's not fair to say that we can reverse type 1 diabetes." Genetic factors and the disease progressing too far in the study participants may be the reasons why not all of the cases in the study were reversed, but more research is needed to find out for sure, he says. Dysinger says the key to preventing and reversing diabetes is giving up processed, fatty foods, cutting back on meat, eating plant-based wholefoods and exercising. "I don't think you have to go tota Continue reading >>

Managing Type 2

Managing Type 2

In type 2 diabetes, your pancreas is still working but not as effectively as it needs to. This means your body is building insulin resistance and is unable to effectively convert glucose into energy leaving too much glucose in the blood. Type 2 diabetes can sometimes initially be managed through lifestyle modification including a healthy diet, regular exercise and monitoring your blood glucose levels. Eating well helps manage your blood glucose levels and your body weight Exercising helps the insulin work more effectively, lowers your blood pressure and reduces the risk of heart disease. Regular blood glucose monitoring tests whether the treatment being followed is adequately controlling blood glucose levels or whether you need to adjust your treatment. The aim of diabetes management is to keep blood glucose levels as close to the target range between 4 to 6 mmol/L (fasting), this will help prevent both short-term and long-term complications. Your healthcare team including your doctor, specialist, dietician and Credential Diabetes Educator, can help you with blood glucose monitoring, healthy eating and physical activity. However, sometimes healthy eating and exercise is not enough to keep the blood glucose levels down. Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition. As time progresses, the insulin becomes more resistant and the pancreas is less effective converting glucose into energy. To help the pancreas convert glucose into energy, people with type 2 diabetes are often prescribed tablets to control their blood glucose levels. Eventually it may be necessary to start taking insulin to control blood glucose levels. This is when your body is no longer producing enough insulin of its own. Sometimes tablets may be continued in addition to insulin. If you require medication as Continue reading >>

Home - Type 1 Diabetes Network

Home - Type 1 Diabetes Network

Forum for parents to discuss caring for children with T1 Chat to others with T1D on a range of topics Sign up for our free e-learning for health professionals And an extra special thanks to @CarlyWanderlust for coming along to share her experiences with us! #type1backpacking about 3 years ago Looks like it's time for @CarlyWanderlust to go back to experiencing Colombia! Thanks to all for your questions #type1backpacking about 3 years ago Does anyone have any more questions for Carly about her backpacking adventures? #type1backpacking about 3 years ago Welcome to the website of the Type 1 Diabetes Network (T1DN) anetwork of people affected by type 1 diabetes, creating opportunities to share real-life experiences, information and knowledge in order to make living with type 1 a better experience. This website is developed by people who live with type 1 diabetes themselves, or have a child who lives with type 1. We have drawn on our extensive personal experiences to provide support to other people living with type 1 in Australia. In this sense, the Type 1 Diabetes Network is a unique organisation! We seek to complement, rather than duplicate, the work of other diabetes organisations, networks and professional groups. We want to help create an empowered and active type 1 diabetes community by providing support, information, and a voice for people with type 1. One of the ways we do this is through our Reality Check forum, which provides a secure and safe place for people to bitch, moan, argue, or rejoice (yes, really) about having type 1 diabetes. We are also very proud of our brilliant Starter Kit, a special resource for newly diagnosed people; and our online learning module, Living with Type 1, which is an important tool in advocating and raising awareness on issues of con Continue reading >>

Australian Ndss Covers Cgm For Some Patients

Australian Ndss Covers Cgm For Some Patients

Australian NDSS Covers CGM for some patients I thought Id share this, as although it wont impact me, unfortunately I am too old, for many people in Australia this is a big change! The Australian Government is now providing access to fully subsidised continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) products through the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS). Subsidised access to CGM sensors and transmitters is available through the NDSS to children and young people aged under 21 years, living with type 1 diabetes, who meet specific criteria. The NDSS also provides subsidised access to insulin pen needles and syringes, blood glucose test strips, urine ketone test strips and insulin pump consumables. to children and young people aged under 21 years, living with type 1 diabetes, who meet specific criteria No its not, which is slightly disappointing, but for parents of T1 diabetics no doubt this will be a big positive. Frankly, I can potentially see why the government cant simply fund completely CGM technology at this stage for all diabetics, given the cost of the technology as it currently stands. What frustrates me to no end, is that private health insurers in Australia continue not offer any form of rebate or recompense. Having said that, I think its also short sighted of a lot of governments, to not offer better public funding for technology like continuous glucose monitors, as the reality is it will drastically increase peoples risks of complications down the track, and would in the big picture save money. I would even like them to continue funding low level technology. As a T2 I no longer get subsidised test strips. There is no point in my joining the NDSS again this year, I suspect a lot of their funding will dry up. I briefly read about that, what exactly was the change for Ty Continue reading >>

Australia Subsidizes Bydureon For Type 2 Diabetes

Australia Subsidizes Bydureon For Type 2 Diabetes

Australia subsidizes Bydureon for type 2 diabetes Australia subsidizes Bydureon for type 2 diabetes Tens of thousands of Australians with type 2 diabetes will be able to benefit from a treatment method which will see their twice-daily injections of Byetta replaced with a single weekly shot of Bydureon. Exenatide is available in two forms. Byetta is a form of the drug that needs to be taken twice a day whereas Bydureon, a newer form of the drug, need only be taken once each week. The drug works by reducing the rate at which the gut absorbs glucose from food, and by increasing the rate that insulin is released by the pancreas. It is therefore suitable for people with type 2 diabetes and can help stabilize blood glucose levels, but should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes. The Federal Health Minister Sussan Ley announced that Bydureon, will become available and subsidized through the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). The PBS seeks to ensure that residents of Australia can get their prescriptions for a price that they can afford, subsidizing those who otherwise would not be able to afford it. Making the once-a-week treatment available through this scheme will not only improve the quality of life of people with injection treated type 2 diabetes, but also will be cheaper and save up to $1,600 per year. This is easier, its cheaper and most importantly for people with type 2 diabetes, up to 20,000 who can benefit from this treatment, it will avoid long term complications, Ley said. This is part of our governments commitment to listing medicines without fear or favor on the PBS, once advised by our expert committees. Exenatide can help to reduce blood sugar levels and assist weight loss in those with type 2 diabetes. As with the majority of type 2 diabetes tre Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas does not produce insulin because the cells which make insulin have been destroyed by the immune system. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 10 to 15 per cent of all people with diabetes. It usually occurs in people under 30, but can occur at any age. How do you get type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is classified as an autoimmune condition. An autoimmune condition is where your body’s defence system (the immune system) is triggered to attack healthy tissue. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system is triggered by a gene or genes. People are born either with or without the genes (13 genes have been identified). People without the genes will not develop type 1 diabetes and people born with the gene may or may not develop type 1 diabetes. This gene is thought to have been stimulated by an environmental event. Once the gene has been stimulated it triggers the immune system to attack the cells of the pancreas that produce insulin and slowly destroys them. The destruction of these cells reaches a critical point where there are not enough cells to produce enough insulin to control blood glucose levels, and the person then starts to develop the signs and symptoms of diabetes. Signs and symptoms Signs may include the following: thirst frequent urination lethargy or being very tired blurred vision sudden unexplained/unplanned weight loss infections or wounds that don't improve constant hunger mood swings. Finding a cure At this time, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. It is hoped that the multiple research studies currently being conducted world-wide will lead to better knowledge about type 1 diabetes and, eventually, a cure. Managing type 1 diabetes Insulin replacement therapy is critical for the person with type 1 diabetes to live. It Continue reading >>

The Needs, Concerns, And Characteristics Of Younger Australian Adults With Type 2diabetes.

The Needs, Concerns, And Characteristics Of Younger Australian Adults With Type 2diabetes.

1. Diabet Med. 2013 May;30(5):620-6. doi: 10.1111/dme.12078. Epub 2013 Feb 28. The needs, concerns, and characteristics of younger Australian adults with Type 2diabetes. (1)The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes, Diabetes Australia - Vic, Melbourne, Australia. [email protected] AIMS: The mean age of onset of Type 2 diabetes mellitus is decreasing inAustralia and internationally. We conducted an internet-based survey to improveour understanding of the emotional well-being and unmet needs of younger adultswith Type 2 diabetes, and to inform service provision for this group.METHODS: A random sample of National Diabetes Services Scheme registrants (n =1,417) with Type 2 diabetes, aged 18-39 years, living in the Australian state of Victoria received an invitation to complete the online survey. The study was alsoadvertised state-wide. The survey included validated scales (PAID-5:diabetes-related distress; WHO-5: general emotional well-being) andstudy-specific items. A total of 149 eligible respondents participated.RESULTS: Almost two-thirds (63%) of respondents reported severe-diabetes related distress; more than a quarter (27%) had impaired general emotional well-being.Most (82%) were overweight or obese (BMI 25); most (77%) had at least one otherco-morbidity. Lack of motivation, feeling burned out, and being time-poor wereidentified as top barriers to self-management. More than half (59%) ofrespondents had not participated in structured diabetes education. Respondentsperceived that younger adults with Type 2 diabetes had different health-careneeds than their older counterparts (68%), and that most Type 2 diabetesinformation/services were aimed at older adults (62%). Of a range of potentialnew services, respondents indicated greatest interest in an on Continue reading >>

Australian Type 2's Not On Insulin Losing Test Strips

Australian Type 2's Not On Insulin Losing Test Strips

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Australian Type 2's not on insulin losing test strips I've only just ran across this information, though apparently it was announced back in June. It appears we are going to get the same sort of treatment that the British have been receiving From July 1, 2016 Type 2's not taking insulin will receive restricted access to test strips, though the extent of the restrictions has not been announced. Also the price of some diabetes drugs will be increased. The article from Diabetes Australia can be found here: The article contains a link if you want to write an email to the Health Minister protesting the changes. I'm not surprised Indy, I think that it's unforunately the way most governments are going . Here's what your College of GPs says I've only just ran across this information, though apparently it was announced back in June. It appears we are going to get the same sort of treatment that the British have been receiving From July 1, 2016 Type 2's not taking insulin will receive restricted access to test strips, though the extent of the restrictions has not been announced. Also the price of some diabetes drugs will be increased. The article from Diabetes Australia can be found here: The article contains a link if you want to write an email to the Health Minister protesting the changes. This is such a huge issue for we diabetics using food/and activity as treatment, with the all-important BG meter indeed. I am thinking, if we ever want evidence that the pharmaceutical industry Continue reading >>

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