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Type 2 Diabetes For Beginners

Type 2 Diabetes Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Guide

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2

Tweet The diagnosis experience of people with type 2 diabetes can vary quite significantly. Some people are given a good introduction to what type 2 diabetes is and access to well run diabetes education courses. However, we’re aware that some people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have been given a prescription for tablets and been told to get on with it! Our guide here provides important information as to what type 2 diabetes is and how you can get on top of the condition and start controlling it at an early stage. What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a condition which develops if your body can no longer respond effectively enough to its own insulin to prevent your blood glucose levels from going too high. The good news is that you can fight back against this and get your body to respond better to insulin. Our Low Carb Program shows you how you can achieve this and, since we launched it in 2015, many thousands of people have improved their ability to control their diabetes. Coming to terms with type 2 diabetes Diabetes can be a tough condition to accept but the good news is that it is a condition which, with a bit of dedication, can be well controlled. It’s fair to say that there are a good number of people with type 2 diabetes that have actually been pleased to have got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes because it has explained why they were feeling less than well and has given them the chance to take achievable steps to feel better than they have in a long time. The Diabetes Forum has thousands of posts from people with type 2 diabetes and there is no better place to find support and share your experiences. If you are finding the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes to be a shock, or are struggling to come to with your diagnosis, read our guide on accepting a di Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes For Beginners, 2nd Edition

Type 2 Diabetes For Beginners, 2nd Edition

Type 2 Diabetes for Beginners, 2nd Edition Are you a diabetes beginner? If you've just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have the warning signs of prediabetes, you're not alone. This revised and updated edition brings the latest in diabetes care while building motivation and confidence. People who are diagnosed with diabetes find themselves in a whole new world where even the most common everyday events, such as eating breakfast, take on exaggerated importance. Its a world where a person needs a sympathetic guide to help him or her decide what to do next. The amount of information to take in and act on is overwhelming. But its important to learn and take action now, because this is the way to defeat diabetes and live well in spite of it. Fully revised and updated, this is the take-you-by-the-hand guide that will become a trusted friend and adviser for the millions of people who find themselves in the growing ranks of people with diabetes. It can be a lonely and scary place to be, whether one has had diabetes for a day or for 20 years. As with all skillsand managing diabetes is just another skill that can be learnedit is wise to start with the basics and to return to them regularly. With decades of experience counseling individuals and designing reader-friendly publications, Phyllis Barrier is with readers from the first day of diagnosis, through the shock and fears that may arise, and teaches them what the simple steps are and how to take them to make a real difference in their health now, and in all their tomorrows. The operative word is "beginners." This book is so juvenile you should not even consider it if you are a high school grad or more. The writing style is that of a nursery school teacher reading to the "story circle." The author seems to think her audie Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is the presence of high blood sugar due to your body’s resistance to insulin and, in many cases, production of too little insulin. You can think of insulin as the key that opens cells and allows glucose (i.e. sugar) to enter your cells. If your body is insulin resistant, then not all of that sugar can enter your cells and it builds up in the blood causing high blood sugar. Diabetes is extremely common. In the United States, there are over 25 million people with type 2 diabetes and another 79 million people with pre-diabetes. Globally, there are over 350 million people with type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes means that someone is showing signs of insulin resistance but has not met the clinical definition of type 2 diabetes. We believe that this is an important early warning and should be taken very seriously. If you don’t change your lifestyle, pre-diabetes leads directly to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is initially manages by weight loss, exercise and changes to diet (mostly eating fewer carbohydrates). Weight loss and exercise improve your body’s sensitivity to insulin and decrease your blood sugars. Eating fewer carbohydrates in one sitting gives your body the opportunity to process them before they have a chance to build up as glucose in your blood. If this initial treatment approach does not work, you are often prescribed blood-sugar lowering medication. We do not know the precise cause of type 2 diabetes. If you read through the forums, you will find nearly as many theories as members. However, we do know many things: Type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component. In studies of twins, if one sibling has type 2 diabetes, the other has a 60-75% chance of developing it. Obesity is strongly correlated with type 2 diabetes, although there are many Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Diabetes For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Diabetes For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Diabetes, which is excessive glucose in your blood, leads to serious health problems if left untreated. Follow the American Diabetes Association screening guidelines to get tested for diabetes at the earliest possible time. Adopt some basic rules for living with diabetes and continuing your diabetes care to better control the disease. If you’re prescribed oral medications for diabetes, do your homework on dosage amounts and side effects. Screening Guidelines for Diabetes The American Diabetes Association created guidelines to screen for diabetes at the earliest possible appropriate time. Take a look at these guidelines to find out when to get tested for diabetes: People with symptoms of thirst, frequent urination, and weight loss are tested immediately. People older than age 45 should be tested every three years if normal. People should be tested at a younger age and more often if: They are obese. They have a parent or sibling with diabetes. They are from a high-risk group, such as African American, Hispanic, Asian, or Native American. They have delivered a baby more than 9 pounds or had gestational diabetes. They have high blood pressure. They have low HDL cholesterol or high triglycerides. 10 Rules for Diabetes Control Diabetes doesn’t have to rule your life. Be proactive! Follow these guidelines for controlling your diabetes, and your problems should be few and far between: Major monitoring: Make sure your doctor orders the key tests at the right times. Devout dieting: Work with a dietitian to develop a great eating plan. Tenacious testing: Check your blood glucose at correct intervals. Enthusiastic exercising: Burn off calories and help your heart. Lifelong learning: New things are being discovered and you need to know about them. Meticulous medicating: You can Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects your body’s use of glucose (a type of sugar you make from the carbohydrates you eat). Glucose is the fuel your cells need to do their work. You need glucose for energy. You also need insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose enter your cells so that it can be converted to energy. Here’s the problem: People with type 2 diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) can’t properly use or store glucose, either because their cells resist it or, in some cases, they don’t make enough. Over time, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, which can lead to serious health complications unless people take steps to manage their blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans, including nearly eight million who don’t even know they have it. You may be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes if it runs in your family, if you are of a certain age or ethnicity, or if you are inactive or overweight. Type 2 diabetes vs. type 1 diabetes What’s the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce insulin. The immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need life-long insulin therapy. Type 2 diabetes is much more common. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin properly or, in some cases, doesn’t make enough. It’s usually diagnosed in middle-aged or older adults, but anyone can develop type 2 diabetes. It can be managed through diet, exercise, and medication. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t use insulin as it should or when the pancreas doesn Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Books About Type 2 Diabetes

Children With Diabetes - Books About Type 2 Diabetes

We've all heard about the dramatic increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. These books address the issues surrounding this growing epidemic. symbol and link indicates that the title is available for order on-line through Amazon.com . When you order through Amazon.com, we earn a small portion of the sale, which is used to help us deliver this web site to you. 101 Tips on Foot Care for People with Diabetes, 2nd Edition, by Jessie H. Ahronia, PhD, ARNP, CDE, BC-ADM and Neil M. Scheffler, DPM, FACFAS, FAPWCA. Published by the American Diabetes Association, 2006. $14.95 softcover. ISBN 1-58040-249-6. Adults with diabetes -- type 1 or type 2 -- need to take special care of their feet to prevent foot complications from diabetes. 101 Tips on Foot Care for People with Diabetes offers 101 tips on foot care, covering the basics (how to trim toenails) to the more advanced (circulation issues that can lead to problems in your feet). If you are an adult with diabetes and are concerned about foot care, this book is easy to understand and will help you get started on the path to correct foot care. 8 Weeks to Maximizing Diabetes Control by Laura Hieronymus, MSEd, APRN, BC-ADM, CDE and Christine Tobin, RN, MBA, CDE. Published by the American Diabetes Association, 2008. $16.95 softcover. ISBN 1-58-040279-8. Even if takes more than eight weeks, the advice given in this book should help you get on track toward a lower A1c and better control of your type 2 diabetes. In 8 Weeks to Maximizing Diabetes Control, CDEs Laura Hieronymus and Christine Tobin provide specific advice progressing over an eight week period. First, they make dietary suggestions. In the next chapter, they address the importance of exercise. Chapter four covers the importance of self-monitoring. In chapter five, the Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes For Beginners

Type 2 Diabetes For Beginners

This is an excellent book for those who are newly diagnosed with type two diabetes or prediabetes. It's tone is warm and friendly, and yet it shares the most important things a person needs to know. Reading this book felt like sitting down with an experienced friend at the kitchen table over a cup of coffee or tea. I have type one diabetes, and I read this book because two of my loved ones have just been diagnosed with prediabetes. I wanted to know how to help and support them as well as understa This is an excellent book for those who are newly diagnosed with type two diabetes or prediabetes. It's tone is warm and friendly, and yet it shares the most important things a person needs to know. Reading this book felt like sitting down with an experienced friend at the kitchen table over a cup of coffee or tea. I have type one diabetes, and I read this book because two of my loved ones have just been diagnosed with prediabetes. I wanted to know how to help and support them as well as understanding what they might be going through. I also wanted to know how their treatment might differ from mine so I don't give them wrong advice if asked. ...more Although the "dialogue" between the author and her mother was a bit cheesy, this has been the best book I've read yet about how to be healthy with diabetes or prevent diabetes if you're prone to it. Very practical and simple. Encourages taking steps. I would highly recommend this to anyone who has pre-diabetes, diabetes 2 or has someone in their family with the disease. Jan 14, 2015 Jen Zamarron rated it it was amazing While the conversations with her mom were simplistic and a little silly, the overall book was exactly what I needed. Great information for people unfamiliar with the disease. I now feel prepared, whereas before I fel Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding diabetes is the first step toward managing it. Learn what diabetes is and how it affects your body, what kind of diabetes you have, and how to manage your health. Understanding diabetes is the first step toward managing it. So what do you need to know? First, you need to know what diabetes is and how it affects your body. And you’ll need to know what kind of diabetes you have. Next you have to know how to maintain your health, treat your diabetes, know when your treatment is successful and what to do when it’s not. This section will take you through the answers to these first questions, and give you important information that will help you live a healthy life with diabetes. In this section you will learn: What is type 2 diabetes?: Information about how people develop type 2 diabetes and who gets type 2 diabetes How The Body Processes Sugar: Information about the natural control of blood sugar, and what is different when you have diabetes Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which your pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or your body does not properly use the insulin it makes. As a result, glucose (sugar) builds up in your blood instead of being used for energy. Your body gets glucose from foods like bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, milk and fruit. To use this glucose, your body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body to control the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. The good news You can live a long and healthy life by keeping your blood glucose (sugar) levels in the target range set by you and your health-care provider. You can do this by: Eating healthy meals and snacks Enjoying regular physical activity Monitoring your blood glucose (sugar) using a home blood glucose meter* Aiming for a healthy body weight Taking diabetes medications including insulin and other medications, if prescribed by your doctor Managing stress effectively * Discuss with your health-care provider how often you should measure your blood glucose (sugar) level. Who can help you? Your health-care team is there to help you. Depending on your needs and the resources available in your community, your team may include a family doctor, diabetes educator (nurse and/or dietitian), endocrinologist, pharmacist, social worker, exercise physiologist, psychologist, foot care specialist, eye care specialist. They can answer your questions about how to manage diabetes and work with you to adjust your food plan, activity and medications. Remember, you are the most important member of your health-care team. Get the support you need A positive and realistic attitude towards your diabetes can help you manage it. Talk to others who have diabetes. Ask your local Diabetes Canada branch about joining a peer-support group or taking p Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that's characterized by high blood sugar, which doctors refer to as hyperglycemia. In type 2 diabetes, the two main contributors to high blood sugar are insulin resistance and a drop in your body's production of insulin. These two factors are what makes type 2 diabetes different from type 1 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and other types of diabetes. What Is Insulin Resistance? Insulin — the hormone that allows your body to regulate sugar in the blood — is made in your pancreas. Insulin resistance is a state in which the body’s cells do not use insulin efficiently. As a result, it takes more insulin than normal to transport glucose (the main type of sugar found in the bloodstream) into cells, where it can be used for fuel or stored for later use. Insulin resistance develops over time, and as the body becomes more and more insulin resistant, the pancreas responds by releasing more and more insulin. This higher-than-normal level of insulin in the bloodstream is called hyperinsulinemia. For a while, the pancreas may be able to keep up with the body’s increased need for insulin, and blood sugar levels may stay within the normal range — about 70 to 100 mg/dl before meals and lower than 140 mg/dl after meals. Eventually, however, the pancreas can no longer keep up, and blood sugar levels begin to rise. What Causes Type 2 Diabetes? It's not known for certain why some people develop type 2 diabetes and some do not. There are several factors, however, that can increase a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes: Obesity Being obese or overweight puts you at significant risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Four out of five people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Prediabetes Prediabetes is a condition in which your blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Understanding Medication - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Understanding Medication - Nhs.uk

Most people need medicine to control their type 2 diabetes. Medicine helps keep your blood sugar level as normal as possible to prevent health problems. You'll have to take it for the rest of your life. Diabetes usually gets worse over time, so your medicine or dose may need to change. Adjusting your diet and being active is also necessary to keep your blood sugar level down. Diabetes medicines help lower the amount of sugar in your blood. There are many types of medicine for type 2 diabetes. It can take time to find a medicine and dose that's right for you. You'll usually be offered a medicine called metformin first. If your blood sugar levels aren't lower within 3 months, you may need another medicine. Over time, you may need a combination of medicines. Your GP or diabetes nurse will recommend the medicines most suitable for you. Insulin isn't often used for type 2 diabetes in the early years. It's only needed when other medicines no longer work. Diabetes UK has more information about taking medicines for type 2 diabetes . Your GP or diabetes nurse will explain how to take your medicine and how to store it. If you need to inject insulin or medicine called gliptins, they'll show you how. Your diabetes medicine may cause side effects. These can include: If you feel unwell after taking medicine or notice any side effects, speak to your GP or diabetes nurse. Don't stop taking medication without getting advice. How to get free prescriptions for diabetes medication You're entitled to free prescriptions for your diabetes medication. To claim your free prescriptions, you'll need to apply for an exemption certificate. To do this: you should get the certificate in the post about a week later it will last for 5 years take it to your pharmacy with your prescriptions Save your re Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients we need, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Insulin works like a key that opens the doors to cells and lets the glucose in. Without insulin, glucose can't get into the cells (the doors are "locked" and there is no key) and so it stays in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of health problems. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both make blood sugar levels higher than normal but they do so in different ways. Type 1 diabetes happens when the immune system attacks and destroys the cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. Kids with type 1 diabetes need insulin to help keep their blood sugar levels in a normal range. Type 2 diabetes is different. A person with type 2 diabetes still produces insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance ). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels normal. People with insulin resistance may or may not develop type 2 diabetes it all depends on whether the pancreas can make enough insulin to keep b Continue reading >>

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