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Type 2 Diabetes Feet Tingling

Suddenly Developed Tingling Feet

Suddenly Developed Tingling Feet

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnosed type 2 in December (but suspect I had this for a while as my numbers were very high). The past two days I've had tingling/burning sensations in my feet- sometimes moving up to my calves. Is this likely to be neuropathy? Is there anything else I can do other than try and manage blood sugar? According to my meter my average levels over the past 2 weeks are 7.7 - which is a big improvement on my diagnosis levels, so wonder why this has suddenly come on. If you think you are exhibiting signs of diabetic neuropathy you should discuss this with your GP. Getting your blood sugars down to non-diabetic numbers would be a good idea to help in that situation. How is your diabetes being treated? What is your diet like? I suffer from autonomic neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy and both have similar symptoms. I'm on pregablin 100mg twice a day prescribed by my doctor. It's been a great help getting the symptoms under control. It might be worth discussing with your specialist about it, they may prescribe something. Nerve pain isn't well understood by GPs but it's fairly well known by the diabetic community. If you think you are exhibiting signs of diabetic neuropathy you should discuss this with your GP. Getting your blood sugars down to non-diabetic numbers would be a good idea to help in that situation. How is your diabetes being treated? What is your diet like? Hi. Thanks for replying. I am not on any medication and am eating very low carb (less than 30g a day). Tingling has been much less noticeable the past two or three days. I have a GP appointment coming up so can discuss then. I suffer from autonomic neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy an Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Tingling Feet

Tingling Feet

I will admit I'm not the posterchild for diabeties. I've had it probably for 9 years. I started off gungho lost 85 pounds. My sugars went to "normal". I than gained back 50 of the pounds but managed to keep 25 off. My acs were always in the 6 with no effort that is until last year. When I went for yearly check up and was at over 10. I was good for awhile and than slipped up again, a slow learner I guess. Well last month they went down to 9.2. So for the last month I've got myself back into gear. Most of the time when I test my sugars are in the 100s (better then the high 200s). I have noticed in the last few weeks with better sugar levels that my feet have been tingling. Is this normal. My eyes are going wonkey and I know this is because of my better sugar levels. But my feet have never been like this before. Could this be a sign of neuropathy. When I go to the doctor's she never really checks my feet. She ask if they are okay but I can't say they ever been tested. I know this is probably a sign of a bad doctor but than again I could also be a better patient. Any thoughts on this matter I have never had issues with tingling feet but I would guess that it is not necessarily a good thing. It could be a sign of neuropathy although I am not a doctor and would never diagnose you. I have issues from time to time when I run with my heel being a little numb and tingly but other than that no issues. I would definitely get your doctor to check your feet. My endo uses a little vibrator mechanism that he puts on my toes and I have to tell him when I stop feeling the sensation. He also uses the little fishing line string on the bottom of my feet. I would definitely recommend having your doc check your feet at your check-ups. Good luck Thanks for the info. I don't see my doctor agai Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

“pins And Needles” And Diabetes

“pins And Needles” And Diabetes

Paresthesia. This is the medical term for the annoying and sometimes painful tingling, numbness, and “pins and needles” sensations that can sometimes come from diabetes. A good example of a temporary paresthesia is a foot “falling asleep” from sitting on it or the dead feeling in a hand after you slept with it tucked under your head. Compression of a nerve in your wrist can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome, making your hands ache and fingertips numb. Sometimes disc problems in the spine lead to numbness and pain. Those are also instances of parasthesia, but they are not caused by diabetes. The cause of our tingling and numbness from diabetes is usually peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage in the arms, legs, hands, and feet. This complication results from high blood glucose levels damaging nerves and blood vessels. Since the damage hits our smallest blood vessels first, the nerves these vessels feed may develop paresthesia quickly. So tingling and numbness in our toes and fingers are often some of the earliest complications of Type 2 diabetes. But there are many other possible causes of paresthesia. A few of them are hypothyroidism (low thyroid), vitamin B12 deficiency, arthritis, poisoning, stroke, cancer, and conditions such as Lyme disease and HIV. People with diabetes often have problems with hypothyroidism and B12 deficiency. If you are plagued by paresthesia, it is a good idea to get blood tests for these conditions. “If I woke up without pain, I’d think I was dead” This phrase made me laugh, but only because it is so true. Pain is frequently part of life as we age. But I have found that paresthesia caused by diabetes can improve. Getting your blood sugar to the target recommended by your health-care provider will help over time. But in the meantime, Continue reading >>

Tingling In My Feet | Diabetic Connect

Tingling In My Feet | Diabetic Connect

I wanted to know if any one else has tingling in your feet? It is so annoying and I am so tired of having it I dont think its neuropathy (I hear this is horrible to have). But then I have no idea what it could be.. If any one els has this please let me know and if there is something I can do to make it stop. I'm a type 1 Diabetic diagnosed at 3, I'm 18 now and in college. I recently started sitting down for long periods(45 min to an hour and a half from 11:45 to 1:30) cuz my next class is later on in the day. Anyways I've sat like this for 2 days Monday and wednesday, and today(2-12-14) even after stretching and being in a chair(from 1:30-2:45) for an hour and 15 minutes and going home it's now 5pm and the tingling hasn't stopped. I don't think it neuropathy or something like that, but any ideas to make it stop? It doesn't hurt it's just super annoying.. That sounds like a pinched nerve or something like that. You may want to see if some therapy might help. What does your doctor suggest? I haven't gone to see a doctor, it literally just started 2 days ago, but yesterday it stayed tingly from 1:30 til 11pm when I went to bed. It didn't tingle today, but I guess I'll have to make an appointment with my mom's foot doctor. If therapy is needed, at least I'm not going in for head therapy like some people I know, if you catch my drift lol. Then it sounds like it was a pinched nerve from the way you were sitting. Keep mindful of it though. I get tingling in my feet sometimes it feels like needles all over.It goes away. Doesn't happen everyday but I also get stabbing pains in my legs that really hurt. I'm suspecting nueropathy as well. That is how mine started out I just don't get the stabbing pain in my legs yet Its really annoying. I was told it is neuropathy. I am trying to Continue reading >>

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

My husband was diagnosed with diabetes almost a year ago. At first he was experiencing numbness in his feet. Over the past few months, he began having pain as well, sometimes as far up his leg as his calf. What can we do to help these symptoms? I have read that vitamin E and even flaxseed oil are good for the circulation. Would those be helpful? Continue reading >>

Tingling Feet Right After Eating?

Tingling Feet Right After Eating?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have just had dinner, tomato and bean soup with half a slice of high fibre bread and 4 strawberries, and now my feet have a tingling pins and needles feeling. Just tested my 1h ppbs. It was 7.2. Does anyone else get this? Is this due to the carbs/sugar I just ate? I noticed this after lunch earlier as well. Is it this the start of neuropathy? Does it start so soon after eating? this is too difficult Type 2 Well-Known Member There may be a condition related to diabetes here. Some of us get this in our hands and feet and some don't. Yes, I've had that for quite a while - I can usually tell if my BG levels are going up (and also down) by the sensations (they're a sort of tingling, I'd agree) in my lower legs and feet. I've likened it to sometimes feeling like a 'cold flush' in my legs. I also get crackly joints and pain in my hands when trying to close my fingers to make a fist. There's no pain when my fingers are opening, or at rest, just when curling them up. Oddly enough, all those sensations stopped on Day 2 of my attempt at the Newcastle Diet. That was 12 days ago and, so far, they've not been back - fingers crossed (which I can now do without saying: Ouch! Yes, I've had that for quite a while - I can usually tell if my BG levels are going up (and also down) by the sensations (they're a sort of tingling, I'd agree) in my lower legs and feet. I've likened it to sometimes feeling like a 'cold flush' in my legs. I also get crackly joints and pain in my hands when trying Continue reading >>

Healing Numb Feet

Healing Numb Feet

Overview of treatment approaches: • Nondrug therapies • Relaxation and biofeedback • Anodyne therapy • Exercise • Massage • Daily foot care Diabetes is hard on feet. Because the feet are farthest from the heart, any problems with blood flow can leave feet without enough circulation. Results can include numbness, loss of foot strength, and worse. Fortunately, there are some good ways to heal and protect your feet. As Birgitta I. Rice, MS, RPh, CHES, wrote here, much of the pain and numbness people with diabetes experience comes from nerve damage. The nerves are injured both by poor circulation and by high glucose levels. We really need healthy nerves. (As a person with a nerve disease, I know about this.) According to Rice, “Loss of nerve fibers can result in muscle weakness, numbness, loss of reflexes, foot deformities, change in gait, and impaired balance and coordination. Loss of sensitivity to pain or temperature can also occur, leading in turn to blisters and sores from foot injuries that go unfelt.” Numbness is dangerous. Sometimes, people can have a pebble in their shoe and not notice it. Others may get in a hot bath and not realize their feet are being scalded. These kinds of seemingly minor things can lead to infections, which don’t heal because of having poor circulation. This is the major pathway to losing a leg to amputation. People with diabetes are eight times more likely than other people to have a lower leg amputated. If you just woke up one day with numb feet, you would notice a big difference and ask about ways to treat it. It doesn’t work that way, though. Numbness comes on slowly over years, so you don’t notice day-to-day changes. Also, severe pain often comes before numbness, so that the numbness is perceived as a relief rather Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Does Pins And Needles Sensation Means You Have Diabetes?

Does Pins And Needles Sensation Means You Have Diabetes?

The sensation of “pins and needles” is technically known as a form of paresthesia. Paresthesias are abnormal sensations and include sensations of burning, tingling, prickling, skin crawling or itching, often in the hands and/or feet. All the forms of paresthesia are due to nerve damage, either because of some disease affecting the nerves (eg. Multiple sclerosis or diabetes), by traumatic injury or entrapment (eg. Carpel tunnel syndrome), by strokes or by tumors pressing on the nerves.[1] Paresthesias can also be caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency, heavy metal poisoning, alcohol abuse and by a low-functioning thyroid (hypothyroidism).[2] Paresthesias can also be caused by various medications such as antihistamines, blood pressure medication, antibiotics and other medications can cause paresthesias such as that sensation of pins and needles. Just about everyone has experienced temporary paresthesias—these are those times when your leg “fell asleep” as you sat cross-legged or your hands were tingling or vibrating for some time after weed whacking or using some power tool. Paresthesias are usually not painful unless they are cause by spinal or traumatic injury, but they can become chronic (long-term) and can affect your overall quality of life. For example, if the “pins and needles” sensation doesn’t let you sleep, that can affect your quality of life. If that “pins and needles” sensation make it difficult for you to type, hold a pen, use a tool, sew, garden or perform another activity that you enjoy—or that you have to do—THAT can affect your quality of life. In diabetes, paresthesias often precede and are part of a complication of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is believed to result from chronically high levels of blood sugar. Continue reading >>

Tingling, Pain, Or Numbness In The Hands/feet | Manna Health

Tingling, Pain, Or Numbness In The Hands/feet | Manna Health

Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness-loss of feeling-in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use A healthy diet, low in carbohydrates and processed foods, exercise, enough quality sleep and a supplement like the Manna Blood Sugar Support can help to keep blood glucose levels un Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

What Is Diabetic Neuropathy?

Diabetes can harm your nerves. That damage, called neuropathy, may be painful. It can happen in several ways, and they all seem to be related to blood sugar levels being too high for too long. To prevent it, work with your doctor to manage your blood sugar. You may hear your doctor mention the four types of diabetes-related neuropathy: peripheral, autonomic, proximal, and focal. Peripheral Neuropathy This type usually affects the feet and legs. Rare cases affect the arms, abdomen, and back. Symptoms include: Tingling Numbness (which may become permanent) Burning (especially in the evening) Pain Early symptoms usually get better when your blood sugar is under control. There are medications to help manage the discomfort. What you should do: Check your feet and legs daily. Use lotion on your feet if they're dry. Take care of your toenails. Ask your doctor if you should go to a podiatrist. Wear shoes that fit well. Wear them all the time, so your feet don't get injured. Autonomic Neuropathy This type usually affects the digestive system, especially the stomach. It can also affect the blood vessels, urinary system, and sex organs. In your digestive system: Symptoms include: Bloating Diarrhea Constipation Heartburn Nausea Vomiting Feeling full after small meals What you should do: You may need to eat smaller meals and take medication to treat it. In blood vessels: Symptoms include: Blacking out when you stand up quickly Faster heartbeat Dizziness Low blood pressure Nausea Vomiting Feeling full sooner than normal If you have it: Avoid standing up too quickly. You may also need to wear special stockings (ask your doctor about them) and take medicine. In Men: Symptoms include: He may not be able to have or keep an erection, or he may have “dry” or reduced ejaculations. What Continue reading >>

Tingling In The Feet?

Tingling In The Feet?

A lot of people have told me that one of the symptoms of diabetes is tingling in the feet and hands. I am not certain what is meant by this. Occasionally I will get very sharp pains in the tips of my toes (nothing in the hands). It comes on very suddenly and only lasts a few seconds but it hurts very badly. Is this what is meant by the tingling? I ask because I also have gout and have had similar experiences with it. D.D. Family IDDM. Pumping since 12/2007. MM722 CGM What they're talking about is neuropathy. It's nerve damage and can cause tingling or the "pins and needles" sensation. It can also cause sharp pains in the toes among other things. If you think you may have this, consult your doctor. Since you say you have gout, it could be your gout flaring up also. I have tingling and occasional sharp jabs in one foot myself, I couldn't even sleep and then Lyrica took care of that for me. Does gout cause tingling? Another thing that helps if you get jabs or restless feelings in your legs...wear leggins or compression socks...either way, they are tight and I was amazed at how well they worked to stop the jabs which really hurt. I hope this is helpful. I used to get tingling before I was diagnosed T2. It's gotten better with better BG control. I also get a lot of exercise especially streching like yoga and pilates. It's important to get blood moving to your extremities. Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

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