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Type 2 Diabetes Disability Tax Credit

Disability Tax Credits And Benefits For Diabetes (type 2)

Disability Tax Credits And Benefits For Diabetes (type 2)

Disability Tax Credits and Benefits for Diabetes (Type 2) Up to $40,000 in Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) retroactive tax refunds If you or a family member is disabled with diabetes, you may be eligible for retroactive refunds from your past 10 years of paid taxes up to $40,000. Up to $90,000 when setting up a Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) For those taking advantage of the plan, the Canadian government will provide yearly financial support in the form of matching grants up to $3,500 per year and bonds up to $1,000 per year. Contact us for a free consultation with no obligation. When we work with you to obtain retroactive tax refunds, we work on a contingency basis. There is no cost to you unless we obtain a refund. If we are successful, our fee is 25% of the refund. HandyTax works with families members to maximize any tax refund related to a disability family member. Trust HandyTax to communicate with the government and medical staff securely and confidentially. Telephone: 1-888-343-1155 Email: [email protected] Open Daily from 11AM-5PM EST * Voicemails are generally returned within 24 hours HandyTax has had success in the past helping disabled Canadians with diabetes get retroactive disability tax credit refunds from the Canada Revenue Agency. Tax refunds depend on your personal situation and actual refunds can range anywhere below, $40,000. The entire process takes between 3 and 9 months to complete as communication between the CRA and your qualified practitioner are the source of the varying time periods to completion. If you suffer from diabetes, you may qualify for the Disability Tax Credit under more than one category, including, but not limited to, walking, dressing, feeding and mental functions. Type-2 diabetes is not the same as type-1 diabetes, in tha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Disability Tax Credit

Diabetes Disability Tax Credit

What is Diabetes Diabetes includes both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease which causes a person’s pancreas to stop producing insulin. This can strike suddenly and is not related to one’s diet or lifestyle choices. For this type of diabetes there is no cure, however it can be managed with the right tools. Type 2 diabetes is when your body does not product enough insulin or it does not use the insulin that it makes. Signs & Symptoms of Diabetes (Type 1 & Type 2) Signs for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes vary. As mentioned previously, Type 1 diabetes can occur suddenly and can strike children and adults at any age. Symptoms include extreme thirst, frequent urination, drowsiness, increased appetite, sudden weight loss, sugar in the urine, vision loss, heavy breathing, and unconsciousness. Patients with Type 1 diabetes must manage their blood-sugar levels as they are at a higher risk of having a heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputation. Symptoms for Type 2 diabetes include excessive thirst and hunger, sores or cuts that won’t heal, blurry vision, and frequent urination. It is important to note that symptoms for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are very similar. Treatment for Diabetes Although there is no cure for Type 1 diabetes there are still many ways to manage it. In order to live a healthy life it is important to monitor your blood-sugar levels regularly and deliver proper doses of insulin to yourself. To treat Type 2 diabetes it is important to keep your sugar levels in the target range set by your health care provider. It is recommended to eat healthy meals and snacks, regularly exercise, maintain a healthy body weight, take medication prescribed by your doctor, and manage your stress levels. An endocrinol Continue reading >>

Cra Reverses Course On Disability Tax Credit Eligibility For Diabetics

Cra Reverses Course On Disability Tax Credit Eligibility For Diabetics

Open this photo in gallery: The Canada Revenue Agency took steps Friday to quell a furor over what critics were calling its heartless treatment of diabetics. Disability advocates and opposition parties have been excoriating the agency for weeks over the fact that hundreds of Canadians with Type 1 diabetes have suddenly found themselves ineligible to claim the disability tax credit, even though they've previously qualified for it. The CRA insisted there's been no change in the eligibility criteria, which requires an individual to spend at least 14 hours a week engaged in activities related to the administration of insulin. But diabetes support groups pointed to a May clarification letter sent by the CRA to doctors who provide the medical information needed to support a claim for the tax credit. That letter said only in "exceptional circumstances" would adult diabetics need 14 hours a week to manage their insulin therapy; most would not – which would mean they're not eligible for the credit. The CRA said Friday that it will revert to the clarification letter that existed prior to May, and review all applications for the disability tax credit that have been denied based on the May letter. Diabetes Canada welcomed the move. Kimberley Hanson, director of federal affairs for the group, said she hopes the review "serves as an opportunity to make the application process clearer for those who need to access this much needed credit and ultimately provides financial relief and fairness for those living with Type 1 diabetes." The advocacy group argues that the disability tax credit is essential to help diabetics pay for medication, medical supplies and devices and that the loss of the credit had caused enormous stress and financial hardship for those affected. Revenue Minister Di Continue reading >>

Disability Benefits For Diabetes | The National Benefit Authority

Disability Benefits For Diabetes | The National Benefit Authority

Today, there are 11 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes. Every three minutes, another Canadian is diagnosed with the condition. Diabetes is a chronic, debilitating and sometimes fatal disease, where the body cannot produce an adequate amount of insulin for the body, or cant correctly utilize the insulin it does produce. Insulin is a vital hormone that regulates blood-sugar levels. Without sufficient supply of insulin, a person risks damaged organs, blood vessels, and nerves. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the bodys immune system mistakenly attacking and killing beta cells in the pancreas. Since beta cells are responsible for distributing insulin into the blood via the pancreas, without their presence, sugar in the blood builds up rather than being used for energy. Type 1 diabetes is usually treated with insulin dosages; careful meal planning can also regulate blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body cant properly use the insulin it does produce (called insulin insensitivity). This is the most common type of diabetes, affecting 90% of people with the disease. Depending on the severity, the condition can be managed through meal planning, physical activity, or medications. Diabetes has an array of signs and symptoms, the most common being: Its important to note that these are predominantly Type 1 diabetes symptoms; type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. Canadian Disability Tax Credit for Diabetes While people with diabetes can live an active, independent lifestyle, theyll need to adapt to certain changes in diet, exercise, and medications. The Canadian government recognizes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes as disabilities, due to its impact on lifestyle, the cons Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Qualify For Disability Tax Credit?

Does Diabetes Qualify For Disability Tax Credit?

Does diabetes qualify for disability tax credit? A child with Type 1 diabetes who is unable to independently adjust his or her insulin dosage may now qualify for the DTC taking account into time spent by his or her parents in assisting the child to administer the insulin. Jamie Golombek, Financial Post Dec. 17, 2010 | Last Updated: Dec. 20, 2010 7:56 AM ET Last weeks Family Finance column profiled a young couple, Tim and Kathleen, and mentioned that Tims disability and diabetes qualifies him to open a registered disability savings plan. Eligibility to open an RDSP is dependent on qualifying for the disability tax credit (DTC). That diabetes would entitle an individual to claim the DTC surprised some readers, who asked for clarification. Under the Income Tax Act, the DTC is available to people with a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions which markedly restricts one or more of the individuals basic activities of daily living or would markedly restrict an activity if it wasnt for life sustaining therapy. Life-sustaining therapy is therapy that an individual requires to support a vital function and is administered at least three times per week for an average of at least 14 hours per week. The purpose of this rule is to allow individuals to be eligible for the DTC if they must have life-sustaining therapy that requires them to dedicate a significant amount of time away from their normal, everyday activities to receive the therapy. In 2005, the tax rules were amended to state that if the therapy has been determined to require a regular dosage of medication that needs to be adjusted on a daily basis, the activities directly involved in determining the appropriate dosage are considered part of the therapy. As a result of this change, a child with Typ Continue reading >>

People With Diabetes Losing Disability Tax Credit Because Of 'advances In Technology': Minister

People With Diabetes Losing Disability Tax Credit Because Of 'advances In Technology': Minister

People with diabetes losing disability tax credit because of 'advances in technology': minister Published Monday, October 23, 2017 10:00PM EDT According to a letter obtained by CTV News, advances in technology is the reason that most adults with diabetes now dont qualify for a disability credit that can reduce their tax bills by as much as $1,500 a year. In the July 31, 2017 letter, Revenue Minister Diane Lebouthillier explained that in order to receive a disability tax credit under the Income Tax Act, one must require life-sustaining therapy (LST) at least three times each week for a total period averaging at least 14 hours a week to sustain a vital function. In the case of portable devices like insulin pumps, the time that the device takes to deliver the therapy does not count toward the 14-hour requirement, Lebouthillier added in the letter. Activities like following a dietary restriction, exercising, traveling to receive therapy, going to medical appointments, shopping for medication, or recuperating after therapy do not count towards the 14-hour requirement. A leading reason for people with diabetes losing their special tax status, the letter suggested, are modern, portable insulin pumps. In general, and with consideration given to recent advances in technology, adults who independently manage their insulin therapy on a regular basis are unlikely to meet the 14-hours-per-week requirement, Lebouthillier wrote. According to Diabetes Canada , as many as 150,000 Canadians now stand to lose their disability tax credit under the Liberal governments current interpretation of the Income Tax Act, which seems to have been adopted early this year. Diabetes sufferers have been eligible for the disability tax credit for over a decade, but now this government is stripping it aw Continue reading >>

Cra Reverses Disability Tax Credit Restrictions For Diabetics

Cra Reverses Disability Tax Credit Restrictions For Diabetics

CRA reverses disability tax credit restrictions for diabetics Canadian accountants critical of Canada Revenue Agency DTC policy decisions OTTAWA, Jan. 22, 2018 The Canada Revenue Agency has reversed a controversial change to the way it assesses whether taxpayers suffering from Type 1 diabetes qualify for the disability tax credit (DTC). The Agencys initial revision in May 2017 had drawn a sharp response from Diabetes Canada and other health groups who claimed too many deserving people were being shut out from access to the much needed DTC. Jason Kingston, a principal with DSK LLP in Kitchener, Ont., says the reversal seems to be caused by political blowback more than anything else which Im not sure if thats a good way to administer a taxation system. The federal government spent most of the past summer getting beaten up on tax issues, elaborates Kingston, who believes the Liberals subsequently re-examined this issue in the face of public criticism and concluded it would be best to reverse their earlier position rather than continue to deny a critical tax credit to people with a chronic disease. Diabetes Canada claimed last fall that rates of allowances for the DTC for individuals with diabetes had plummeted. We started to notice a change about June when a bunch of people started to contact Diabetes Canada saying Whats happened? It started with some individual patients. But more clinics at that time were [also] really noticing a change in the trend. They were saying we used to never get any of these applications returned/disallowed, and now theyre all coming back that way, Kimberley Hanson, director of federal affairs for Diabetes Canada in Ottawa, told Canadian Accountant last November. Section 118.3 of the Income Tax Act states that a taxpayer could qualify for the DT Continue reading >>

Tax Credits & Your Rights

Tax Credits & Your Rights

Diabetes & You > Know Your Rights > Tax Credits & Your Rights What is Diabetes Canada's position on tax credits for people living with diabetes? The Government of Canada should institute a system of enhanced tax credits wherein people with diabetes would be eligible for consideration for a non-refundable tax credit or a refundable payout specifically designed to reduce the burden of higher medical and treatment costs. Read Diabetes Canada's full position statement on tax credits The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) for Canadians with Diabetes People with diabetes may be eligible for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) if they meet the eligibility criteria for receiving a life-sustaining therapy. What are the eligibility criteria for the DTC? The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) must receive confirmation that the applicant spends at least 14 hours per week on the activities specified by the CRA (listed below) that are related to administering insulin. Kids with type 1 diabetes under the age18 years may be eligiblefor the DTC, as long as the childs physician signs the T2201 Disability Tax Credit Certificate to certify that the eligibility criteria are met. Most kids under age 18 qualify for the DTC because the child and parent/guardian time can be combined to meet the 14 hour per week criteria. The CRA will require individuals to reapply when they turn age 18. Adults must discuss their eligibility with their doctor. Many adults with type 1 diabetes do not qualify for the DTC because the CRA has not received adequate information that they spend at least 14 hours per week on the activities specified by the CRA related to administering insulin. The CRA must receive confirmation from physicians that their patients who are applying for the DTC spend at least 14 hours per week on the activi Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit And Type 1 Diabetes

Disability Tax Credit And Type 1 Diabetes

Disability Tax Credit and type 1 diabetes Disability Tax Credit and type 1 diabetes UPDATE (Oct 24, 2017):JDRF believes the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) interpretation of the rules regarding life-sustaining therapy has now changed, resulting in many Canadians with type 1 diabetes being denied the tax relief they're eligible for under the Disability Tax Credit. On October 20, JDRF addressed members of Canadas Standing Committee on Finance, advocating to make this benefit more widely available to all Canadians living with type 1 diabetes. The CRA has invited JDRF to meet on October 25 to discuss this issue further. Find out more in this press release . As everyone living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their caregivers know, managing the disease can be very costly. The Government of Canada offers some help with this expense, because it officially recognizes T1D as a disability. This allows people living with the disease to apply for a Disability Tax Credit (DTC) and leverage other cost-saving programs. The DTC is a program designed to help those with disabilities or their caregivers reduce the amount of income tax they pay, offsetting some of the significant medical and treatment expenses. To qualify for the DTC, an individuals health care provider must submit a T2201 form to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), certifying that the disability causes severe and prolonged impairment and describing its impact on their patients life. Once approved, the disability amount can be claimed on the individuals (or their caregivers) tax return. The disability tax credit (DTC) is a nonrefundable tax credit used to reduce the income tax you pay. It's available for people with a severe and prolonged physical or mental impairment, subject to approval by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). A clai Continue reading >>

The Disability Tax Credit For People With Diabetes: Could You Be Eligible?

The Disability Tax Credit For People With Diabetes: Could You Be Eligible?

Home Living Well With Diabetes -Articles Support The disability tax credit for people with diabetes: could you be eligible? The disability tax credit for people with diabetes: could you be eligible? Canadian tax form. Personal income tax form used in Canada. While many people with diabetes might not describe their condition as a disability, people who spend a great deal of time and have great difficulty with their day-to-day diabetes management, may be able to apply for a disability tax credit from the Canada Revenue Agency. According to the Agencys website , The disability tax credit is a non-refundable tax credit used to reduce income tax payable A person with a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions may claim the disability amount once they are eligible for the credit. The rationale behind the disability tax credit is to provide relief to taxpayers for their disability costs, since these are additional and unavoidable expenses that other taxpayers dont face. The process of applying for the disability tax credit is prepared in conjunction with your doctor. He or she will submit the necessary application forms and backup material to the Canada Revenue Agency, if it is determined that you are eligible. Tobe eligiblefor the disability tax credit, you must meet all of the following requirements: You must have an impairment in physical or mental functionsthat is prolonged, which means it has lasted, or is expected to last, for a continuous period of at least 12 months. The impairment must be severe, and it must restrict you all or mostly all of the time (at least 90% of the time). Your severe and prolonged impairment must be certified by a qualified practitioner (in the case of a person with diabetes, a doctor). At the Canada Revenue Agency websit Continue reading >>

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

There’s a lot to take in when you, or someone you love, is diagnosed with diabetes. Finding out what benefits you might be entitled to, now or in future, may not be top of your to-do list so here’s a quick overview. Is diabetes a disability? Under the 2010 Equality Act, type 1 diabetes is defined as a disability, in that it may have a ‘substantial, long-term, negative impact on a person’s ability to carry out normal, day-to-day activities’. Many people with type 2 diabetes are also covered by this definition. The aim is protect you from discrimination, such as needing time out during the working day to check your blood sugar levels or recover from a 'hypo' (low blood sugar) episode. It sounds confusing, but if your diabetes is being controlled by medication or diet, the impact of your condition on ‘normal activities’ is decided as if you were not taking medication or following a managed diet i.e. if you were not taking insulin to treat type 1 diabetes, this would have a severe impact on your abilities (it could even be fatal) and so is considered a disability. What can I claim for? If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you will be eligible for certain benefits, depending on the extent to which your condition affects your life. For example, everyone in the UK with diabetes is entitled to free eye checks from the age of 12 – once yearly screening for diabetic retinopathy. And if you’re on any medication for your diabetes, you’ll receive free prescriptions. There are additional benefits available to those with diabetes related to disability and long-term health, such as if you need help or if you’re unable to work. Whether or not you’re eligible depends on factors like additional health issues and how much diabetes affects your day-to-day ac Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit + The Price Of T1d In Canada

Disability Tax Credit + The Price Of T1d In Canada

WRITTEN BY: Jen Hanson Editor’s Note: this piece was originally published on the Connected In Motion Blog. Update: On December 4, 2017, Diabetes Canada and JDRF reported: “Internal CRA documents show intent to deny the disability tax credit to Canadians with type 1 diabetes.” Read below for ways to raise your voice in opposition. Outside of November (World Diabetes Month), it’s not that often that Type 1 diabetes hits the mainstream media. This past week though, if you’ve been anywhere near the TV news, talk radio, or a Facebook feed, you’ve probably heard that the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) has made drastic cuts in approvals of Disability Tax Credit applications for adults living with Type 1 diabetes. This has been done without any substantiated explanation or evidence to support that any Type 1 diabetes therapy requires fewer than 14 hours per week to manage – the standard being used for approval of the credit. The CRA denial documents claim that “the type of therapy indicated [in patient applications do] not meet the 14 hour per week criteria.” This, followed up by a letter from Revenue Minister Diane Lebouthillier outlining that the CRA believes that advances in technology (read: Insulin Pumps) have decreased the time needed by adults to care for for Type 1 diabetes. Perhaps the biggest insult to the Type 1 community is the fact that the CRA has decided that their evaluation of the care needed for Type 1 diabetes supersedes the recommendations of the medical community. Each applicant works with a medical professional to document the minutes and hours required for proper care. An application cannot be submitted without a signature from a medical professional (and, in most cases, follow-up communication with that medical professional to confirm th Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit For People With Diabetes

Disability Tax Credit For People With Diabetes

Disability Tax Credit for People with Diabetes You are here: Home / Disability Tax Credit for People with Diabetes Many people think of our understanding of diabetes as being part of modern medicine. However, knowledge of diabetes dates back several thousand years, to 1552 B.C.E. (Before the Common Era). It was first mentioned by an Egyptian physician during the 3rd Dynasty. The physician’s name was Hesy-Ra and he was perhaps the first doctor to ever identify the condition. However, it wasn’t until 1452 that the word ‘diabete’ was first used, and in the `6th century “Swiss physician Phillipus Aureolus Paracelsus – considered the ‘Martin Luther of Medicine’ – identifies diabetes as a serious general disorder.” Ultimately, however, it was a Canadian doctor by the name of Frederick Banting, the famous physician who discovered Penicillin, who also discovered Insulin. He went on to work with a former student, Dr. Charles Best and began their experiments in earnest in the 1920s. In January 1922, a patient at Toronto General Hospital was the first person in the world to receive Insulin as treatment for his diabetes. He lived for thirteen years after his first treatment. By 1923, Insulin was made commercially available in Canada and the U.S. Dr. Banting became Sir Frederick Banting in 1934, after being knighted by King George V. By 1949, Dr. Best co-founded the Canadian Diabetes Association. In 2010, Dr. Banting and Dr. best were named as Canada’s two greatest inventors. Alongside all these honours, Dr. Banting also received the Nobel Prize for medicine. The work of Banting and Best has inspired thousands of men and women to enter the field diabetes research, and saved the lives of millions of people who use Insulin each day for their diabetes management. Continue reading >>

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