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Type 2 Diabetes Cure Breakthrough

Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough: Scientists Create First Pill That Not Only Stops The Condition In Its Tracks But Also Helps Patients Lose Weight - And It Could Be Available On The Nhs Within 3 Years

Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough: Scientists Create First Pill That Not Only Stops The Condition In Its Tracks But Also Helps Patients Lose Weight - And It Could Be Available On The Nhs Within 3 Years

Scientists have created a new pill that can halt type 2 diabetes in its tracks and help patients shed pounds from their waistlines, a major study has revealed. Results from a human trial of 632 patients found semaglutide allowed 71 per cent of them to shed pounds - it is believed this is the first type 2 diabetes pill to instigate weight loss. Researchers hope semaglutide will offer a better way to control the hidden killer, as some treatments currently available can trigger unexpected weight gain which fuels type 2 diabetes. Results from the phase II trial carried out by the Leicester Diabetes Centre were published in the prestigious JAMA. Semaglutide could be available on the NHS within three years. The pill was handed as an add-on to patients already taking Metformin - the drug is the first line of defence to control the preventable condition. Researchers discovered semaglutide stopped type 2 diabetes in its tracks, slashed blood sugar levels and prevented patients from needing insulin. Type 2 diabetes can lead to heart failure, blindness and leg amputations and is deemed a global time bomb. Spiraling obesity rates have fuelled a 65 per cent rise in diagnoses in a decade, with more than 4 million people now living with the condition, UK data shows. Globally there are 380 million patients. Charities have warned the NHS will become crippled by the burden of the condition without urgent action to make changes to today’s lifestyles. Professor Melanie Davies, lead author, dubbed the results 'hugely promising' and said they show 'semaglutide’s ability to lower HbA1c and support weight loss'. Offering patients some relief Lead author Professor Melanie Davies said taking semaglutide as a pill may provide relief to some diabetics who 'struggle injecting themselves'. She t Continue reading >>

Researcher May Have Found A Cure For Diabetes

Researcher May Have Found A Cure For Diabetes

The most common form of treatment for Type 1 diabetes involves monitoring glucose levels and injecting insulin several times a day. Ending the world’s diabetes epidemic could be one step closer, with a promising new technique curing the condition in mice. Scientists at the University of Texas announced the breakthrough, which uses a novel approach that may eliminate Type 1 diabetes and see painful insulin injections become a thing of the past. University of Texas Health Science Center doctors used a virus as a carrier to introduce insulin-producing genes into the pancreas of rodent subjects. Professor Ralph DeFronzo said researchers altered cells so they secreted insulin, but only in response to glucose — mimicking the behavior of the body’s beta cells. This study bypasses the autoimmune system by altering other pancreatic cells so they can co-exist with immune defenses — unlike beta cells, which are rejected in Type 1 patients. At the moment, Type 1 diabetes is treated by monitoring glucose levels and injecting artificial insulin several times a day. While technology has made management of the condition easier, a cure has been elusive — until now. The patent’s co-inventor, Professor Bruno Doiron, said the results had never been seen before. “It worked perfectly,” Doiron said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects.” Doiron predicted the same low-risk response in humans. “If a Type 1 diabetic has been living with these cells for 30, 40 or 50 years, and all we’re getting them to do is secrete insulin, we expect there to be no adverse immune response.” DeFronzo said the same method of treatment has been approved almost 50 times by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat various conditions, including rare childhood diseases. Whi Continue reading >>

Empa-reg Trial: Implications For Type 2 Diabetes Treatment, Cv Risk Reduction

Empa-reg Trial: Implications For Type 2 Diabetes Treatment, Cv Risk Reduction

At the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, Eliot A. Brinton, MD, FAHA, FNLA, president of the Utah Lipid Center, discussed how the EMPA-REG trial has been a huge step forward for health care providers being able to put patients with type 2 diabetes onto treatments that can also reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Transcript The whole issue of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes is one that we have known for decades is so important. It has always been the primary cause of death in a patient with type 2 diabetes an also the primary source of morbidity. So, somebody who has type 2 diabetes is at high risk of heart attack, stroke, and other related macrovascular diseases. So, the question is how do we address that? For many years we’ve had the theory that just lowering glucose is adequate because there is a relationship between glucose levels and macrovascular disease or cardiovascular disease—that we’ve known. We’ve also had several medications over the years that have had some evidence for lowering cardiovascular events. What we’ve had most recently is a very large, very convincing cardiovascular outcomes trial in the contemporary environment, where we’re using a lot statins a lot of [angiotensin-converting-enzyme] inhibitors—we haven’t had this in the earlier trials—but EMPA-REG in particular was groundbreaking in that a new class of agents—the SGLT2 inhibitors, [in this case] empagliflozin, in a large cardiovascular outcomes trial that looks at these end points in this setting in a randomized, double-blinded trial. And what that trial has shown is convincing evidence for reduction of cardiovascular events in general, and in particular cardiovascular death, which is our most import cardiovascular end point. So EMPA-REG Continue reading >>

The Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough

The Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough

This Silent Assassin Doubles Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke ...but more than half of those at risk don't even know it. How to tell if you are and what you can do about it. By Frank Shallenberger, MD As someone who cares about your health, you try to avoid sugar and refined carbs. You try to exercise. But despite your healthy intentions, you may still be at risk for a heart attack or stroke. You see, there is a silent assassin stalking you. This silent assassin kills 1 person every 10 seconds. And more than half of them never knew they were at risk. They never saw it coming. So what is this silent assassin? It's diabetes. Now I know what you're thinking. "I'm not at risk for diabetes." I hope that's true. I hope you're making the lifestyle choices that will lower your chances. Maybe you're taking supplements like chromium, vanadium, or gymnema sylvestre to balance your blood sugar. They are very effective. I prescribe them to my patients and see excellent results with them. But a healthy lifestyle and supplements may still not be enough to protect you. You may have a family history of diabetes ... you may have high blood pressure ... or high cholesterol ... or you may simply not get enough sleep at night. They are all risk factors for developing diabetes. You see, most people view diabetes as a disease where the pancreas is worn out. That's true. But there's a hidden cause that leads to the pancreas wearing out in the first place. I'll explain what this hidden cause is in just a minute. But first I want to share how one of my patients avoided becoming a victim. Antonio was 43 years old when he first came to see me four years ago. He complained of the two symptoms that I hear the most in my practice: being tired and overweight. His insulin levels were elevated, and Continue reading >>

Potential Breakthrough In Treating Type 2 Diabetes

Potential Breakthrough In Treating Type 2 Diabetes

By blocking VEGF-B, a signaling protein, fat does not accumulate in muscles and the heart, and the cells within those tissues can respond properly to insulin again, researchers from the Karolinska Institute, Sweden, the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, based in New York, and the Australian biopharmaceutical company CSL Limited reported in the journal Nature. Professor Ulf Eriksson and team carried out experiments on rats and mice, and managed to prevent type II diabetes from developing in the first place, as well as reversing disease progression in animals with established diabetes type II. Nature has described this finding as a "breakthrough in diabetes research". Professor Ulf Eriksson, of the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics at Karolinska Institutet, said: "It's a great feeling to present these results. We discovered VEGF-B back in 1995, and since then the VEGF-B project has been a lengthy sojourn in the wilderness, but now we're making one important discovery after the other. In this present study we've shown that VEGF-B inhibition can be used to prevent and treat type II diabetes, and that this can be done with a drug candidate." Typically, type II diabetes occurs after a person becomes obese, then insulin resistance occurs - the diabetes comes next. When this occurs, the cells do not respond properly to insulin, meaning that glucose does not enter the cells and blood glucose (sugar) levels rise. When fat is stored in the "wrong" places in the body, insulin resistance is much more likely to occur. The wrong places include the blood vessels, heart and muscles. Experts are not sure exactly how the association works. With insulin resistance, not enough glucose enters the cells - it accumulates in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar We Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

It’s an extraordinary goal powered by an extraordinary gift. City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. It seems an audacious goal for a comprehensive cancer center, but City of Hope has a long history of groundbreaking work in diabetes. Research conducted by City of Hope led to the development of synthetic human insulin, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with T1D and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” The funding for the transformative research needed to embark on such an endeavor is led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world’s largest home furniture manufacturer. “City of Hope scientists’ research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes,” said Todd Wanek, chief executive officer of Ashley Furniture, speaking on behalf of his family. “It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease.” Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an unprecedented research effort: The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes at City of Hope. A Multifaceted Approach The Wanek Family Project will result in the creation of a series of highly focused programs at City of Hope. The Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough

Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough

SL scientist discoverers highly effective drug for type 2 diabetes The following is an interview withDr. Wijayabandara. The transcript has been condensed and edited. Q: Please talk aboutthe discovery youhave made A: This discovery deals with the novel pharmacological property of a molecule known as beta-Amyrin acetate. I was able to isolate this molecule from the latex of a plant called Tabernaemontana dichotoma. The plants local name is divi kaduru. This was based on ethnomedical use of the latex of this particular plant, because the latex has been used for treating wounds. I wanted to investigate the active substances present in this latex, so I succeeded in isolating and identifying the chemical molecules. I was able to isolate the molecule in Karachi at the International Center for Chemical and Biological Sciences in 2006. Once we isolated the compound, we were able to understand that this molecule could inhibit the enzyme called alpha-glucosidase, which is responsible for carbohydrate digestion in the gut. After figuring out the molecules structure, we got a good idea of its functions and we tested its ability to inhibit alpha-glucosidase in-vitro. We also did an animal study later on. We got very good results, as expected. Beta-Amyrin acetate is 35 times more active than the standard drug, Acarbose, which is widely prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. Our experimental findings were good and the molecule was tested on rats with good results. And then we wanted to file a US patent because we knew that this is a novel pharmacological property of this particular molecule. Then I submitted the application for a patent for this finding to the US Patent Authority in October 2006. I would also like to thank the former President and his Secretary for granting me support f Continue reading >>

Cure For Diabetes: Breakthrough Could End Insulin Shots For Good

Cure For Diabetes: Breakthrough Could End Insulin Shots For Good

A new scientific breakthrough could have found the cure for diabetes. The breakthrough has cured diabetes in mice – with no side effects. The research comes from a UT Health San Antonio report which describes the process as using a gene transfer which can increase the types of cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Researchers said they aim to reach human clinical trials within the next three years. “It worked perfectly,” assistant professor of medicine at UT Health, Dr Bruno Diron said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects. That’s never been seen. “But it’s a mouse model, so caution is needed. We want to bring this to large animals that are closer to humans in physiology of the endocrine system.” Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Diabetes at UT Health described how the therapy works: “The pancreas has many other cell types besides beta cells, and our approach is to alter these cells so that they start to secrete insulin, but only in response to glucose [sugar]. This is basically just like beta cells.” Insulin, which diabetic people take injections of in order to keep their blood sugar levels at bay, are made up of beta cells. In Type 1 diabetes, these cells are destroyed by the immune system and so the patient is left without insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the beta cells fail and insulin decreases – with Type 2 the body also does not use insulin efficiently. If the procedure can be replicated successfully in humans, this could have the potential to cure Type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Breakthrough In Type 2 Diabetes Diet Treatment Research

Breakthrough In Type 2 Diabetes Diet Treatment Research

Researchers in Adelaide have developed a diet and exercise programme that has proved to be highly effective in reducing the burden of type 2 diabetes, with an average 40% reduction in medication levels required. The diet incorporates an eating pattern that is very low in carbohydrates and higher in protein and unsaturated fats. The programme is based on the findings from a A$1.3 million (US$929,300) National Health and Medical Research Council funded study, which compared the low carbohydrate eating pattern with the current best practice approach of managing type 2 diabetes with a high-unrefined carbohydrate, low-fat diet, according to scientists at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation or CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency. "The research results are ground breaking," Associate Professor Grant Brinkworth, principal research scientist at the CSIRO said. He said health professionals have been divided over the best dietary approach for managing type 2 diabetes, and the ongoing uncertainty is a hotly debated topic among clinicians and researchers. "The most amazing benefit of the low carbohydrate diet was the reduction in the patient’s medication levels, which was more than double the amount than the volunteers following the lifestyle programme with the high-carbohydrate diet plan,” he said. "Some of the participants managed to cease their medications altogether, and many described the study as life changing.” Sixty patients tested the diet, low in carbohydrates but high in protein and unsaturated fats, in the two-year study. Medication use on average was almost double the reduction among 60 other volunteers on existing recommended diets. Some stopped medication completely. Stephen Barnett, 65, a volunteer in the two-year study, wa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough: Type 2 'can Be Reversed In Weeks By Following This Diet'

Diabetes Breakthrough: Type 2 'can Be Reversed In Weeks By Following This Diet'

Scientists say lifestyle driven Type 2 - a condition that almost 12 million Britons are thought to be at risk of developing - is caused by excess fat in the liver and pancreas. Findings due to be presented today have given fresh hope that the debilitating disease need not to a life sentence. They reveal that even if sufferers have been blighted for years the condition can be brought under control by sensible eating. Professor Roy Taylor, from Newcastle University, said: “The good news for people with Type 2 is our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important tiny amount of fat out of the pancreas. At present, this can only be done through substantial weight loss.” The good news for people with Type 2 is our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important tiny amount of fat out of the pancreas Nine in 10 Type 2 sufferers are overweight or obese and do not produce enough insulin, or the insulin they produce does not work properly. Professor Taylor, who has spent 40 years studying the condition, will deliver his research to an international collaboration of experts at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Lisbon. He will claim excess calories leads to excess fat in the liver. As a result, the liver responds poorly to insulin and produces too much glucose. Excess fat in the liver is passed on to the pancreas, causing the insulin producing cells to fail. He says losing less than 1 gram of fat from the pancreas through diet can re-start normal production of insulin, reversing Type 2. And he says this remains possible for at least 10 years after the onset of the debilitating disease. Pro Continue reading >>

Is There A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is There A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is estimated to affect more than one in sixteen people in the UK. Most of these are diagnosed, but there are still around half a million people who are unaware that the condition is affecting their body. When it is diagnosed, though, what can doctors do to stop it? Medication can regulate blood sugar levels, which counteracts the effects to some extent. But in a breakthrough study, scientists may have found a way to cure type 2 diabetes. The different types of diabetes According to the Medical Research Council, nearly four million people in the UK have diabetes. And the vast majority – around 90 percent – are suffering specifically from type 2 diabetes rather than type 1. Here’s the difference: Type 1 diabetes: An autoimmune condition where the pancreas is damaged and cannot produce any insulin Type 2 diabetes: A condition which develops largely due to a person’s diet and weight. The pancreas becomes unable to produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells fail to react to insulin Some people are genetically predisposed to type 2 diabetes, but it is generally brought on by long-term overweightness – increasing in likelihood with age. And much like other weight-related diseases, doctors have so far only been able to recommend lifestyle changes to reduce its impact. A bigger problem across the pond While type 2 diabetes is a significant problem in the UK, over in the states it’s even worse. Around 1 in 11 Americans have type 2 diabetes. And a large amount of them are suffering specifically because of insulin resistance. Touched upon above, this is where the body’s cells cannot take in insulin as normal as opposed to insufficient insulin being produced. This prompted researchers at the University of California to search for a treatment. The tea Continue reading >>

3 Easy Steps:

3 Easy Steps:

Dr Oz Discovers Shocking New Trick That Treats The Root Cause And Cures Diabetes Forever! Why Is He Being Sued For Sharing It? Currently, Dr. Oz is trending on Social Media because of a legal battle between him and three of the biggest pharmaceutical companies around. The companies claim a diabetes curing diet Dr. Oz found called Diabetes Destroyer should be taken off of the internet. The public claims big pharma doesn’t like it because it hurts their profits. Being one of the most trusted names in the world when it comes to modern medicine. Dr. Oz’s followers are confident “He will never ever recommend something to people that could hurt them”. When Dr. Oz found out that Diabetes Destroyer is responsible for over 11,000 people per year being fully cured of type 2 diabetes; he knew the world had to see this. It just so happens those same drug companies experienced a collective 18-point drop in their stock values right before the lawsuit was filed. Dr. Oz’s supporters have taken their frustration to social media saying that losing money is the real reason they’re suing him. Many people think this is the true reason for them filing the lawsuit against him. Dr. Taylor discovered the cure for type 2 diabetes over 9 years ago. However, he couldn’t continue his research because the diabetes-drug company Sanofi bought out the organization that funded his research, then scrapped his project to silence him. Dr. Roy Taylor’s discovery... In his study of countless patients, he discovered that type 2 diabetes doesn’t cause the insulin blocking layer of fat to form and settle around the pancreas like the medical community originally thought it did. Rather, that nuisance layer of fat that blocks insulin is in fact, the real cause for diabetes! This is a groundbreaki Continue reading >>

New Drug Appears To Eliminate Type 2 Diabetes For First Time

New Drug Appears To Eliminate Type 2 Diabetes For First Time

Type 2 diabetes, although influenced by a person’s genes, is largely thought to be brought about by a poor diet and being overweight for prolonged periods of time, particularly at an old age. The pancreas is either unable to produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells simply don’t react to insulin, which leads to dangerously high blood sugar levels. This is known as insulin resistance, and at present, there is no medical way to treat this. A new drug forged by a team at the University of California, however, might prove to be a veritable game-changer. As reported by New Scientist, a daily dose of the drug, given to mice with insulin resistance, canceled out the harmful condition. This is the first time that any treatment has effectively “cured” type 2 diabetes. The team of researchers had an inkling that a particular enzyme was responsible for bringing about insulin resistance. The enzyme – cacophonously known as low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphate, or LMPTP – can be found in the liver, and it appears to interact with cells in such a way that they become resistance to the presence of insulin. Conjuring up a brand new drug that was specifically designed to hinder the progress of LMPTP, the team thought that it would allow the cells’ insulin receptors to once again be able to react to insulin as they normally would. Much to their delight, they found that they were correct. “Our findings suggest that LMPTP is a key promoter of insulin resistance and that LMPTP inhibitors would be beneficial for treating type 2 diabetes,” the team noted in their Nature study. For this study, their drug was orally administered to a few unfortunate laboratory mice. These mice had been fed an extremely high-fat diet, and they had developed obesity and type 2 dia Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the most common form of diabetes, is considered a metabolic disorder that results in high-blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) caused by an insulin resistance and deficiency. A normally functioning pancreas will secrete the insulin hormone in low amounts after eating a meal. The glucose (sugar) found in the foods we eat stimulate the secretion of the insulin hormone proportional to the size of each meal. The main role of insulin is to help move specific nutrients into the body’s cells, mainly sugar, which they use as a source of energy. When glucose levels in the bloodstream rise, the beta cells located in the pancreas increase the secretion of insulin to avoid hyperglycemia. In type 2 diabetes, this process works improperly. Instead of moving into your cells to be used as a source of energy, glucose builds up in your bloodstream. Unlike people diagnosed with type 1, the bodies of people with type 2 diabetes produce the hormone insulin. The two main problems caused by type 2 diabetes is the pancreas not producing enough insulin and the body not using the insulin sufficiently. A diagnosis of T2DM occurs when the body does not use the hormone insulin properly. The process of improper secretion and absorption is referred to as insulin resistance. In the early stages, the pancreas makes extra insulin to regulate the high blood glucose (sugar) levels, but over time it is not able to make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. When there isn’t enough insulin or the insulin is not used properly, glucose can’t get into the body’s cells as it should, causing body’s cells to not function normally. Although it is diagnosed far more than type 1 diabetes, the causes of type 2 diabetes are considered to be less understoo Continue reading >>

Breakthroughs For Diabetes Treatments

Breakthroughs For Diabetes Treatments

Reading Time: 9 minutes. >> Summary: Recently pharmaceutical firms have released new diabetes treatments, including one in the past week. Moreover, a promising new therapy that attacks the root cause of type 2 diabetes is in the development pipeline. [This article first appeared on the LongevityFacts.com website. Author: Brady Hartman. ] The CDC recently shocked the public when they reported that 40% of Americans walking around today would develop type 2 diabetes. Many people develop type 2 diabetes as they age because their body’s response to insulin – the hormone that controls sugar levels – gets weaker. Fortunately, scientists have discovered new treatments for the disease and have more in the pipeline. One such drug, ertugliflozin (brand name Steglatro) was released less than a week ago. Moreover, researchers at UCSD are developing a promising new therapy that attacks type 2 diabetes at its cellular roots. Furthermore, doctors have developed a medication maintenance program, which can help prevent type 2 diabetics from health-robbing complications such as blindness, heart and kidney disease, and peripheral vascular disease. There is also hope for type 1 diabetics, as scientists are working on improved insulin delivery devices, replacing damaged pancreases with stem cell-derived islet cells and the novel ‘pancreas in a box‘ that may restore normal insulin regulation. Type 2 Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has been a documented human disorder for millennia, but only in recent decades has it developed into an epidemic. Mentions of the condition in ancient medical texts are rare. The primary drivers of the worldwide epidemic are the increasing age of the population, and the obesity epidemic, fed by the growing global adoption of the Western diet. Obesity – the mo Continue reading >>

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