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Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough 2017

Intensive Medical Treatment Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Intensive Medical Treatment Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Intensive medical treatment can reverse type 2 diabetes Intervention induced several months of remission in up to 40 percent of clinical trial participants Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with intensive medical treatment using oral medications, insulin and lifestyle therapies, according to a study. One in 10 American adults has type 2 diabetes, according to experts. The condition occurs when an individual doesn't produce enough insulin or the pancreas isn't making insulin as efficiently as it could. One in 10 American adults has type 2 diabetes, according to experts. The condition occurs when an individual doesn't produce enough insulin or the pancreas isn't making insulin as efficiently as it could. Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with intensive medical treatment using oral medications, insulin and lifestyle therapies, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Type 2 diabetes is typically thought of as a chronic condition. As it progresses, individuals with type 2 diabetes often need to use a healthy diet, exercise and an increasingly complex combination of medications to manage the condition. "By using a combination of oral medications, insulin and lifestyle therapies to treat patients intensively for two to four months, we found that up to 40 percent of participants were able to stay in remission three months after stopping diabetes medications," said the study's first author, Natalia McInnes, MD, MSc, FRCPC, of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. "The findings support the notion that type 2 diabetes can be reversed, at least in the short term -- not only with bariatric surgery, but Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough: Scientists Create First Pill That Not Only Stops The Condition In Its Tracks But Also Helps Patients Lose Weight - And It Could Be Available On The Nhs Within 3 Years

Type 2 Diabetes Breakthrough: Scientists Create First Pill That Not Only Stops The Condition In Its Tracks But Also Helps Patients Lose Weight - And It Could Be Available On The Nhs Within 3 Years

Scientists have created a new pill that can halt type 2 diabetes in its tracks and help patients shed pounds from their waistlines, a major study has revealed. Results from a human trial of 632 patients found semaglutide allowed 71 per cent of them to shed pounds - it is believed this is the first type 2 diabetes pill to instigate weight loss. Researchers hope semaglutide will offer a better way to control the hidden killer, as some treatments currently available can trigger unexpected weight gain which fuels type 2 diabetes. Results from the phase II trial carried out by the Leicester Diabetes Centre were published in the prestigious JAMA. Semaglutide could be available on the NHS within three years. The pill was handed as an add-on to patients already taking Metformin - the drug is the first line of defence to control the preventable condition. Researchers discovered semaglutide stopped type 2 diabetes in its tracks, slashed blood sugar levels and prevented patients from needing insulin. Type 2 diabetes can lead to heart failure, blindness and leg amputations and is deemed a global time bomb. Spiraling obesity rates have fuelled a 65 per cent rise in diagnoses in a decade, with more than 4 million people now living with the condition, UK data shows. Globally there are 380 million patients. Charities have warned the NHS will become crippled by the burden of the condition without urgent action to make changes to today’s lifestyles. Professor Melanie Davies, lead author, dubbed the results 'hugely promising' and said they show 'semaglutide’s ability to lower HbA1c and support weight loss'. Offering patients some relief Lead author Professor Melanie Davies said taking semaglutide as a pill may provide relief to some diabetics who 'struggle injecting themselves'. She t Continue reading >>

Sami Inkinen On His Bold Plan To Cure Type 2 Diabetes Forever

Sami Inkinen On His Bold Plan To Cure Type 2 Diabetes Forever

Sami Inkinen founded and then exited Trulia about a year after Zillow snapped it up for $3.5 billion in 2014. He’s since moved on to build Virta, a health care startup claiming it can cure type 2 diabetes. It’s a bold claim. Most treatment plans offer to help those with the disease manage it, not get rid of it. But Inkinen, with zero medical background, believes he’s found a way to wholly eradicate diabetes for good. The secret is as simple as a low-carb diet. It seems pretty obvious — cut out the sugar and bad carbs and your diabetes will get better. But that’s easier said than done with humans. Inkinen tells me he’s learned through time where the pain points are and what people need to truly succeed. So far Virta has conducted a small trial involving 262 people and the results seem promising. A majority (91 percent) of those participating finished the program and 87 percent of them either reduced their dosage or went off their insulin, says the startup. Over half of the participants were able to reduce at least one of their diabetes medications. I sat down with Inkinen to talk about his company and why he decided to jump into the health care space after his success in the real estate field. SB: That’s a bold claim that you’re making that you can cure diabetes. SI: Yeah totally…Without tech you can’t do Virta. We’re not just a software company, we’re a software company that combines biochemistry and science to cure the disease. If one of those is wrong it’s not going to work. SB: Do you worry you tell them a bit too early to get off their medications? SI: Yeah, that’s precisely the reason why we have our own doctors. That’s precisely the reason why we have a full-stack health care company…It’s absolutely critical that we get this data Continue reading >>

Breakthroughs In Diabetes And Prediabetes Treatments (our Best Of 2017)

Breakthroughs In Diabetes And Prediabetes Treatments (our Best Of 2017)

Breakthroughs in Diabetes and Prediabetes Treatments (Our Best of 2017) Summary: A brief review of the top reports in 2017 on prediabetes and type 2 diabetes treatments, including new ones and those in the pipeline.[This article first appeared on the LongevityFacts.com website . Author: Brady Hartman .] A paper published in the Lancet shocked the public last year when they reported that 40% of Americans walking around today would develop type 2 diabetes. While type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of premature death, the World Health Organization (WHO) upset even more people when they announced that prediabetes the precursor state to diabetes kills far more people. Heres a look back at the reports in 2017 on the ways to prevent type 2 diabetes and prediabetes and the promising treatments in the pipeline for these two forms of diabetes . The Lancet reported that 40% of Americans walking around today will develop type 2 diabetes. The same report added that people with diabetes are living longer due to improved management of the disease. Type 2 diabetes is one of the most expensive of health conditions. In fact, type 2 diabetes consumes over a quarter of medical spending in the US or just over 14% of total US healthcare spending. In 2014, US patients, taxpayers, and insurers spent $112 billion on treating 16.8 million acute cases of the type 2 diabetes. Spending on diabetes in 1962 a half-century earlier was just $1 billion in 2014 dollars. The continuing declines in heart disease and cancer will probably soon elevate diabetes into one of the top three causes of illness and disability. Article: New study shows forty percent of us will get diabetes . Preventing, Detecting and Treating Prediabetes More than one in three American adults has prediabetes, and 90% of them dont kno Continue reading >>

Type 1 Cured In Mice

Type 1 Cured In Mice

Ralph DeFronzo and his researchers at UT Health at San Antonio announced that they have cured type 1 diabetes. Researchers think they have found a way to trick the body into curing type 1 diabetes that may also have a great impact possibly for type 2 diabetes. Even though it was only in mice, this could be very positive, even with years of testing still remaining. Doctor Ralph DeFronzo, chief of the diabetes research at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, says that this way of doing a gene transfer can wake up cells in the pancreas to produce insulin. The immune system of a person with diabetes kills off useful “beta” cells, but the researchers say they have found a way to make other cells in the pancreas perform the necessary work. Their approach, announced earlier this month in the academic journal Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, not only would have implications for type 1, but also could help treat the far more common type 2 diabetes. The researchers have cured mice, which are genetically similar to people but different enough that new rounds of animal testing are needed before human trials can begin. This approach is sure to attract skeptics, in part because it is a significant departure from the many other attempts at curing diabetes, which typically involve transplanting new cells and/or suppressing the immune system’s attempts to kill off useful ones. By contrast, “we’re taking a cell that is already present in the body and programming it to secrete insulin, without changing it otherwise,” said DeFronzo. Diabetes is a disease characterized by a person’s inability to process carbohydrates, a condition that if untreated can lead to often-catastrophic health consequences. The core problem is insulin. Most people naturally secrete that su Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months, trial shows Lifestyle changes coupled with drugs reversed diabetes in 40 per cent of patients in just four monthsCredit:Alamy Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months by cutting calories, exercising and keeping glucose under control, a trial has shown. Although the condition is considered to be chronic, requiring a lifetime of medication , Canadian researchers proved it was possible to restore insulin production for 40 per cent of patients. The treatment plan involved creating a personalised exercise regime for each trial participant and reducing their calories by between 500 and 750 a day. The participants also met regularly with a nurse and dietician to track progress and continued to take medication and insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. After just four months, 40 per cent of patients were able to stop taking their medication because their bodies had begun to produce adequate amounts of insulin again. Encouraging exercise and cutting calories allowed the pancreas to rest, scientists believeCredit:Getty The researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, said the programme worked because it gavethe insulin-producing pancreas a rest. "The research might shift the paradigm of treating diabetes from simply controlling glucose to an approach where we induce remission and then monitor patients for any signs of relapse," said the study's first author, Dr Natalia McInnes, of McMaster. "The idea of reversing the disease is very appealing to individuals with diabetes. It motivates them to make significant lifestyle changes. This likely gives the pancreas a rest and decreases fat stores in the body, which in turn improves insulin production and effectiveness." The number of people in the UK with ty Continue reading >>

Diabetes Wonder Drug: New Pill Can 'significantly' Improve Health Of Type 2 Sufferers

Diabetes Wonder Drug: New Pill Can 'significantly' Improve Health Of Type 2 Sufferers

British researchers have shown a simple pill has the power to lower blood sugar and promote weight loss in just three months. The development is significant as the once a day tablet could potentially end the need for painful daily insulin injections. And it comes as figures show the diabetes epidemic gripping the UK costs the NHS more than £10 billion a year with a new diagnosis made every two minutes. Trials showed up to 90 per cent of patients receiving semaglutide lowered their blood glucose levels and experienced “meaningful” weight loss. Study leader Melanie Davies, Professor of Diabetes Medicine at the University of Leicester, said: “These results demonstrating semaglutide’s ability to have a significant impact on lowering blood glucose and support weight loss when taken orally therefore are hugely promising. “Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition with potentially devastating complications which is posing a major challenge to health services across the world because of the increasing numbers of people developing it.” Although there are several treatments for Type 2 currently available many come with an increased risk of developing low blood sugar, a condition known as hypoglycaemia, and weight gain. The pill could be available in as little as two years. Type 2 diabetics either do not produce enough insulin, which controls blood sugar levels, or the insulin they produce does not work properly. The condition is largely lifestyle driven with nine in 10 sufferers overweight or obese. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Meanwhile, about 12 million people in the UK are at increased risk of Continue reading >>

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

Diabetes is not just one condition - but whether your body is struggling with blood sugar levels due to type 1, or type 2, or even only during pregnancy, it's a serious condition that requires daily care and still doesn't have a cure. But scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Brand new beta cells. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. 2. A preventative vaccine. Finnish researchers are about to embark on the first-ever clinical trial for a type 1 diabetes prevention vaccine. While it's not a cure for those who already have the condition, a successful vaccine could potentially prevent thousands of cases each year, as the vaccine targets a virus linked with the development of an autoimmune reaction in the pancreas. 3. A unique transplant. One woman with severe type 1 diabetes has spent a year without insulin injections thanks to an experimental transplant. Doctors implanted insulin-producing cells into a fatty membrane in the stomach cavity, and the success of the operation is paving the way towards more people receiving artificial pancreases. 4. New pancreas tissue. Earlier this year scientists announced that they reversed type 1 diabetes in mice by giving them a transplant of pancreatic tissue. The tissue was grown using stem cells from non-diabetic mice, and the success of this method suggests i Continue reading >>

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

A radical low-calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetes, even six years into the disease, a new study has found. The number of cases of type 2 diabetes is soaring, related to the obesity epidemic. Fat accumulated in the abdomen prevents the proper function of the pancreas. It can lead to serious and life-threatening complications, including blindness and foot amputations, heart and kidney disease. A new study from Newcastle and Glasgow Universities shows that the disease can be reversed by losing weight, so that sufferers no longer have to take medication and are free of the symptoms and risks. Nine out of 10 people in the trial who lost 15kg (two-and-a-half stone) or more put their type 2 diabetes into remission. Prof Roy Taylor from Newcastle University, lead researcher in the trial funded by Diabetes UK, said: “These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated. This builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. “Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we’re seeing … is that losing weight isn’t just linked to better management of type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission.” Worldwide, the number of people with type 2 diabetes has quadrupled over 35 years, rising from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. This is expected to climb to 642 million by 2040. Type 2 diabetes affects almost 1 in 10 adults in the UK and costs the NHS about £14bn a year. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated with medication and in some cases, bariatric surgery to restrict stomach capacity, which has also been shown to reverse the disease. Continue reading >>

New Drug Appears To Eliminate Type 2 Diabetes For First Time

New Drug Appears To Eliminate Type 2 Diabetes For First Time

Type 2 diabetes, although influenced by a person’s genes, is largely thought to be brought about by a poor diet and being overweight for prolonged periods of time, particularly at an old age. The pancreas is either unable to produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells simply don’t react to insulin, which leads to dangerously high blood sugar levels. This is known as insulin resistance, and at present, there is no medical way to treat this. A new drug forged by a team at the University of California, however, might prove to be a veritable game-changer. As reported by New Scientist, a daily dose of the drug, given to mice with insulin resistance, canceled out the harmful condition. This is the first time that any treatment has effectively “cured” type 2 diabetes. The team of researchers had an inkling that a particular enzyme was responsible for bringing about insulin resistance. The enzyme – cacophonously known as low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphate, or LMPTP – can be found in the liver, and it appears to interact with cells in such a way that they become resistance to the presence of insulin. Conjuring up a brand new drug that was specifically designed to hinder the progress of LMPTP, the team thought that it would allow the cells’ insulin receptors to once again be able to react to insulin as they normally would. Much to their delight, they found that they were correct. “Our findings suggest that LMPTP is a key promoter of insulin resistance and that LMPTP inhibitors would be beneficial for treating type 2 diabetes,” the team noted in their Nature study. For this study, their drug was orally administered to a few unfortunate laboratory mice. These mice had been fed an extremely high-fat diet, and they had developed obesity and type 2 dia Continue reading >>

Under-skin Transplants Show Promise For Type 1 Diabetes

Under-skin Transplants Show Promise For Type 1 Diabetes

In theory, transplanting insulin-producing cells into the body should work as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, in practice, researchers face many challenges, especially in finding a non-hostile environment for the cells. Now, a new study describes a tissue engineering approach that may create a suitable environment under the skin. In the journal Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) at the University of Toronto in Canada describe how they developed and tested their subcutaneous transplant method in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. A significant feature of the study is that the transplant method uses tissue engineering to generate blood vessels that integrate with the host's blood supply. Insulin-producing cells are very sensitive to lack of oxygen, and inadequate blood supply is a problem that has dogged previous attempts to transplant them. Type 1 diabetes destroys islet cells Diabetes is a chronic disease that develops when the body cannot stop blood sugar or glucose getting too high. If untreated, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, damages many parts of the body, including the heart, kidneys, eyes, nerves, and blood vessels. Insulin - a hormone that is produced in the pancreas - is the body's main regulator of blood sugar. It helps cells to take in sugar and use it for energy. In people with type 1 diabetes, their immune system destroys the islet cells in their pancreas that produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body produces insulin but cannot use it effectively. There are approximately 30.3 million people living with diabetes in the United States. Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for around 5 percent of diabetes, is most often diagnosed in childhood, or during the Continue reading >>

Major Breakthrough In Type 2 Treatment

Major Breakthrough In Type 2 Treatment

A trial testing a pioneering type 2 diabetes treatment has been hailed as a major breakthrough. The two-year programme combined liraglutide with a latex tube, known as an Endobarrier device. A total of 70 people from centres in Birmingham, London and Glasgow took part in the two-year study and the group with Endobarrier combined with liraglutide lost an average of two stone in weight and drastically reduced their blood sugar levels. The study entitled REVISE Diabesity was funded by the Association of British Clinical Diabetologists (ABCD), and run by the diabetes research team at the Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals (SWBH) NHS Trust. Changing lives Dr Piya Sen Gupta, one of the clinical leads of the study, said: “We know that a majority of patients with diabetes do not respond well to enforced diets in the long term, that 75 per cent of patients fail to respond to certain diabetes drugs sufficiently and that surgery is quite a radical option. “The results of the REVISE-Diabesity Study show that combining this device and drug is very effective in just one year and offers promise to patients with diabetes in terms of a new treatment option.” The treatment involved inserting Endobarrier device through the mouth into the person’s small intestine to reduce the rate at which food is absorbed. The device is simple to remove after a year and can be remo ved earlier if necessary. Gastroenterology consultant and clinical director for scheduled care at SWBH, Mark Anderson, said: “It is rewarding to be with the participants at the beginning and end of the study to see the difference the treatment has made to their lives. “Many of them are so much healthier and active. We hope they can carry on with healthier eating habits after their Endobarrier is removed.” Tob Continue reading >>

Researcher May Have Found A Cure For Diabetes

Researcher May Have Found A Cure For Diabetes

The most common form of treatment for Type 1 diabetes involves monitoring glucose levels and injecting insulin several times a day. Ending the world’s diabetes epidemic could be one step closer, with a promising new technique curing the condition in mice. Scientists at the University of Texas announced the breakthrough, which uses a novel approach that may eliminate Type 1 diabetes and see painful insulin injections become a thing of the past. University of Texas Health Science Center doctors used a virus as a carrier to introduce insulin-producing genes into the pancreas of rodent subjects. Professor Ralph DeFronzo said researchers altered cells so they secreted insulin, but only in response to glucose — mimicking the behavior of the body’s beta cells. This study bypasses the autoimmune system by altering other pancreatic cells so they can co-exist with immune defenses — unlike beta cells, which are rejected in Type 1 patients. At the moment, Type 1 diabetes is treated by monitoring glucose levels and injecting artificial insulin several times a day. While technology has made management of the condition easier, a cure has been elusive — until now. The patent’s co-inventor, Professor Bruno Doiron, said the results had never been seen before. “It worked perfectly,” Doiron said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects.” Doiron predicted the same low-risk response in humans. “If a Type 1 diabetic has been living with these cells for 30, 40 or 50 years, and all we’re getting them to do is secrete insulin, we expect there to be no adverse immune response.” DeFronzo said the same method of treatment has been approved almost 50 times by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat various conditions, including rare childhood diseases. Whi Continue reading >>

Cure For Diabetes: Breakthrough Could End Insulin Shots For Good

Cure For Diabetes: Breakthrough Could End Insulin Shots For Good

A new scientific breakthrough could have found the cure for diabetes. The breakthrough has cured diabetes in mice – with no side effects. The research comes from a UT Health San Antonio report which describes the process as using a gene transfer which can increase the types of cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Researchers said they aim to reach human clinical trials within the next three years. “It worked perfectly,” assistant professor of medicine at UT Health, Dr Bruno Diron said. “We cured mice for one year without any side effects. That’s never been seen. “But it’s a mouse model, so caution is needed. We want to bring this to large animals that are closer to humans in physiology of the endocrine system.” Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Diabetes at UT Health described how the therapy works: “The pancreas has many other cell types besides beta cells, and our approach is to alter these cells so that they start to secrete insulin, but only in response to glucose [sugar]. This is basically just like beta cells.” Insulin, which diabetic people take injections of in order to keep their blood sugar levels at bay, are made up of beta cells. In Type 1 diabetes, these cells are destroyed by the immune system and so the patient is left without insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the beta cells fail and insulin decreases – with Type 2 the body also does not use insulin efficiently. If the procedure can be replicated successfully in humans, this could have the potential to cure Type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

New Way To Beat Diabetes: Single Operation Could Cure Type 2 Disease, Says Uk Doctors

New Way To Beat Diabetes: Single Operation Could Cure Type 2 Disease, Says Uk Doctors

The procedure – using a plastic liner in the gut – either cleared the condition or made its effect much milder. It could also end the need for painful daily insulin injections. Results from the ground-breaking treatment have been so encouraging experts last night called for surgery to be “fully recognised” as an option for Type 2 diabetes. Under the procedure, patients have the plastic liner fitted into the stomach to stop the walls of the upper gut coming into contact with food. It blocks key hormones entering the blood. Professor Francesco Rubino, who is leading the research at King’s College Hospital in London, said: “In many patients, blood sugar levels go back to normal within days.” The trials offer fresh hope to the four million people living with lifestyle driven Type 2 diabetes. Prof Rubino added: “About 50 per cent of patients are diabetes free after these procedures. The remaining people demonstrate big improvements of blood sugar control and can drastically reduce their dependence on insulin or other medication.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The trials are taking place at King’s and University College Hospital and City Hospital in Birmingham, Britain’s “diabetes capital”. The flexible plastic stomach sleeves were developed to mimic the effects of a gastric bypass without surgery and have been approved for clinical use in Europe and South America. In British trials, patients fitted with the 23½inch-long “EndoBarrier” sleeve have seen marked improvement in symptoms. Those fitted with it had lived with Type 2 for 12 years on average and usual treatments, inc Continue reading >>

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