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Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Month

Are You One Of The 33% With Prediabetes? 90% Don't Realize It

Are You One Of The 33% With Prediabetes? 90% Don't Realize It

Developing Type 2 diabetes is a bit like getting dumped in a relationship (only much worse). Even if you are blind-sided when it occurs, it really doesn't occur overnight. Instead, you may miss the many warning signs, until your doctor tells you the bad news (about diabetes, that is, and not about your relationship). The just released 8th Edition of the International Diabetes Federation's (IDFs) Diabetes Atlas confirms that the global diabetes epidemic continues to get worse. This year 10 million more people are living with diabetes than in 2015, meaning that 1 in 11 adults now has diabetes, for a total of 425 million people. Diabetes includes type 1 diabetes (otherwise known as juvenile-onset diabetes) in which you don't make enough insulin and type 2 diabetes (previously known as adult-onset diabetes, although now more and more children are developing it) in which your body doesn't effectively use the insulin you produce. There are other types of diabetes but the vast majority (around 90%) of all diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes. A major aim for World Diabetes Day, which is today, and Diabetes Awareness Month (which is this month, November) is to help "people learn their risk for prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes along with steps to take to potentially reverse course," as Heather Hodge, Director of Chronic Disease Prevention Programs at the YMCA-USA (also known as the Y-USA for short, in case you don't have enough time to say the MCA) explained. The lead up to type 2 diabetes can be missed at two different stages. The first is not properly addressing obesity or being overweight, which are major risk factors for type 2 diabetes. As the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery indicates, over 90% of those with type 2 diabetes are overweight or have obesity. Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

The biggest month for diabetes awareness activities is only a few days away, and it’s the perfect time to raise your voice to increase awareness about diabetes! You might ask: Why? How does more awareness meaningfully impact the lives of people with diabetes? The question is a good one, but the answer is simple. Awareness is the first step to any kind of change. More funding for research, better public support for legislation issues. More understanding and empathy. Less blame and shame. Awareness + education is even more powerful. Knowing symptoms of type 1 can be life-saving when a diagnosis is right around the corner. If you’re at risk for type 2, education can help prevent or delay the progression of the disease (in cases where you’re able to do that). And education that helps our communities offer support (instead of blame) through a very challenging disease is invaluable. Here’s a list of different ways you and your family and friends can make an impact for diabetes in your community. 1. Make Social Noise with JDRF’s Thunderclap Campaign Once again JDRF kicks off National Diabetes Awareness Month on November 1st with type 1 diabetes awareness day, “T1D”, a day devoted to raising the voices of people touched by type 1 diabetes. Use the web platform “Thunderclap” to join in an auto-generated, mass-shared social media post All you have to do is sign-up on the JDRF #noT1D Thunderclap page. Show your friends, family, and the public you can live well with this disease and chase your dreams – whether that’s running marathons, travelling the world, falling in love, or advocating for a cause. The Instagram contest will ask you to show a photo of how you’re doing just that along with a few sentences on what it’s like to live with diabetes. Look for Continue reading >>

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting. Here at DiabetesMine, we’ve covered these November diabetes activities at length over the years. Please browse through this overview of posts we’ve written to get a sense of what happens when diabetes awareness becomes a national and international priority. Diabetes Awareness Month 2017 This year, we believe the need for diabetes awareness month is more important than ever. Many different diabetes organizations have a plethora of activities and initiatives, including the American Diabetes Association and JDRF that are both emphasizing the "invisible illness" aspect of living with diabetes. Our roundup explores all of the happenings within the USA and across the world. Diabetes Months of the Past Don’t miss our coverage of what happened for Diabetes Awareness Month last year, in both the U.S. and across the globe. You’ll read about efforts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), JDRF, Diabetes Hands Foundation, and other groups working to raise public awareness and make a difference for the Diabetes Community. You can also reflect back on the prior year, with our coverage of Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, when both the ADA and IDF focused on the theme of educating people about healthy eating. World Diabetes Day and the Blue Circle World Diabetes Day (WDD) was established by the International Di Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

Each issue, WebMD the Magazine's "Health Highlights" focuses on a national health theme for the month with expert tips, reader comments, and eye-catching factoids. November is Diabetes Awareness month. Follow these tips to stay at your peak! 1. Say "Om" Learn to meditate to help reduce stress and improve your blood sugar levels. 2. Step Out Exercise helps keep your weight and blood sugar under control, and just about everyone can do a brisk daily walk. 3. Eat Right Follow your food plan. If you don't have one, ask your doctor about seeing a dietitian who specializes in diabetes. 4. Jet Set Before you hit the road, get a checkup, pack extra meds, and plan your doses around time zone changes. 5. Hang 10 Drop 10% of your body weight through diet and exercise. 6. Trade Up Swap saturated fats and refined sugar for healthy fats in nuts and sweet whole fruit. 7. See Clearly Diabetes complications can cause vision loss or blindness. Schedule a full eye exam at least once a year. 8. Stand Up You may not feel foot injuries, so check both feet daily for blisters, cuts, or sores. 9. Show Color Pack your plate with a palette of greens, yellows, and reds -- like spinach, squash, and tomatoes. 10. Learn More Visit WebMD's Diabetes Center for news, tips, a blood sugar tracker, and more. Tips from Adrian Vella, MD, endocrinologist, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Use the web or your smartphone to help you manage what you eat. Online tools can help you keep track of your calorie consumption, aid in meal planning, and provide important nutrition information to help you make healthy choices. Get a pedometer. People with diabetes need to exercise. For many of my patients, that means walking. Set a goal. Tips from Deborah J. Wexler, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

It is estimated that almost 400 million people worldwide are affected by diabetes, and this number is increasing in every country.1 Type 2 diabetes accounts for over 90% of cases of diabetes.2 However, there are still various myths and misconceptions about all aspects of type 2 diabetes including treatments, what one with diabetes can eat, possible complications, and more. This November, we’re raising awareness about what type 2 diabetes is, who gets it, how it can be managed, and more. We’ll be sharing information and articles here and on our Facebook and Twitter, and recipes on our Instagram. Want to take part in awareness month? Read on for simple ways that YOU can raise awareness! Change your Profile Picture & Cover Image! One of the easiest ways to spread awareness is to update your profile picture and cover image on social media! Facebook Frame Our custom Facebook frame features a ribbon for diabetes awareness! You can add the frame to your current Facebook profile picture by following the instructions found on the Type2Diabetes.com Facebook page. You can update your cover photo by downloading one of the images below; to download it to your computer, simply right-click on the image and choose the option to “Save Image As” – and it’s yours! Then, you can upload it to Facebook like you would any photo! Join the conversation Continue reading >>

What's Happening For Diabetes Awareness Month And World Diabetes Day 2016

What's Happening For Diabetes Awareness Month And World Diabetes Day 2016

November is upon us -- the time of year when "all eyes are on diabetes" for National Diabetes Awareness Month and World Diabetes Day on Nov. 14. That day was chosen in honor of Dr. Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin back in 1921, who would be 125 years old were he still alive to celebrate this birthday! This National Diabetes Month campaign has been going on for much longer than many realize; it was established over four decades ago in 1975, though the American Diabetes Association (ADA) didn't trademark the term "American Diabetes Month" until 1997. Meanwhile, World Diabetes Day was launched by the International Diabetes Federation in 1991 to call attention to this worldwide epidemic, and it got a big boost when the United Nations issued a resolution on it in 2006. The first-ever WDD was recognized in 2007. All of these November observances exploded about a decade ago with the emergence of the Diabetes Online Community (DOC), where people can easily create and promote new campaigns and initiatives. Some of these repeat annually, while others are specific to a particular year. Leading up to November, President Barack Obama issued the now-annual presidential proclamation marking November as National Diabetes Awareness Month. On Oct. 28, the White House posted this symbolic gesture of official federal government recognition of our condition, which they've been doing since the mid-1980s. Here's a quick look at what’s on offer in November 2016 from some prominent advocacy organizations. Of course, if you know of any other activities, please let us know in comments below! ADA's Story Site As always, the ADA is active for this NDAM 2016. Mainly, the org is launching a brand new This Is Diabetes campaign, which is a story-telling effort based on the idea that no Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes is one of the most common and dangerous health problems facing Americans today. It occurs when the body is unable to control how the body uses sugar for energy and the amount of sugar in the blood rises. When untreated, the high sugar levels can lead to many serious problems including painful burning or numbness in the hands and feet, vision problems and blindness, kidney disease, heart attacks, strokes, blood flow problems resulting in amputations of toes and feet, coma and death. There are different types of diabetes. Type 1 (formerly called Juvenile Diabetes), most commonly starts in childhood. The cause of this of Type 1 diabetes is unknown. It occurs when the cells in the body that produce insulin die off. Insulin is the hormone that helps the cells of the body use blood sugar for energy. Without insulin, sugar cannot get into cells. Children and adults with Type 1 diabetes require insulin shots to help control their blood sugar levels. These shots are usually given several times per day. Because the cause is unknown, there is no way to prevent Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the cells in the body stop responding to normal insulin levels, causing blood sugar levels to build up. Type 2 diabetes can be treated with pills that must be taken once or twice every day. Many people need more than one type of pill and some will need pills and insulin or shots of another type of shot to help the body use and control blood sugar levels. Risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes are well known including: Having a family member with diabetes. Being overweight or obese. Not doing enough exercise or physical activity. Smoking. For women, high blood sugar during a pregnancy. Asians, Latinos and African-Americans are also more likely to get diabetes than whi Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and much government and media attention is focused on the need to slow the growing “epidemic” of diabetes and prediabetes in the United States. Efforts to this end include the American Diabetes Association’s Stop Diabetes campaign, which encourages people to take an online risk test to assess their personal risk of developing prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes and to see a doctor if their test results suggest a high risk. But what if you already have diabetes? Is there anything in National Diabetes Month for you? Of course there is! For people who already have diabetes, it’s as good a time as any to take a look at your diabetes management and ask yourself how things are going. Are there areas that need improvement? Are you interested in connecting with other people who have diabetes? Would you like to participate in a diabetes fundraiser? Would you like to learn something new? Here are some suggestions for making the most of a month devoted to diabetes. 1. Commit to a new healthy habit for one month. Many lifestyle habits — not just eating and exercising — can affect your general health and your diabetes management. Some may affect your blood glucose levels directly, and others may have a more indirect effect, enabling or preventing you from carrying out your daily routines, for example. Rather than choose something you feel you “should” do, pick something you feel able and willing to do. Here are some ideas: Get more sleep. Not getting enough sleep can increase insulin resistance, meaning your body requires more insulin to get glucose into your cells. This can lead to higher blood glucose levels and is believed to have other negative health effects. Inadequate sleep also tends to leave you feeling fatigued during the day Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

2017 is coming to an end, but this message still rings true for this and every year. November is Diabetes Awareness Month and these simple suggestions can help you prevent prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes and manage all diabetes types-Type 1, Type 2, gestational and MODY, maturity-onset diabetes of the young. For families living with all types of diabetes, the holidays can be challenging. Rich side dishes and desserts can wreak havoc on your waistline and glucose levels. Alcohol packs of calories and pounds-especially cocktails with sugar. Speaking with a registered dietitian and with your endocrinologist can help you stay safe and keep your glucose levels within normal limits during these festive times. For families of Type 1 diabetic patients, well-meaning friends and family frequently offer advice and suggestions that can be dangerous. Far too many people don’t really understand the difference between Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that requires insulin injection, and Type 2 diabetes, a disease managed with oral meds, insulin or both. But that doesn’t stop them from giving unsolicited advice. Eliminating carbohydrates for anyone on a basal insulin dose can be deadly. Eating food that doesn’t have a nutrition label can be challenging when calculating bolus insulin doses. Hypoglycemia can be especially dangerous if you skip meals, or inject too much insulin.Shaming Type 1 adults and kids because of a ‘bad” glucose level does more harm than good. Focusing on healthy meals with a balance of complex carbohydrates, good fats and lots of vegetables are the keys to sound nutrition. And yes, you can eat dessert like everyone else. Moderation is the key for everyone at the dinner table. And during the holidays, get outside. Physical activity is recommended an Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Month

American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. One in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people. And another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news? People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. How can American Diabetes Month make a difference? We can use this month to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. Here are just a few ideas: Encourage people to make small changes, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Talk to people in your community about getting regular checkups. They can get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked, and ask the doctor about their diabetes risk. Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity. How can I help spread the word? We’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example: Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the YMCA of the Triangle is encouraging residents to learn their risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to take preventive steps to potentially reduce their chances of developing the disease. 1 IN 3 NORTH CAROLINIANS HAVE PREDIABETES It is estimated that more than 2.5 million North Carolinians may have prediabetes, that's 1 in 3 people. Only about 9 percent of the population report having been diagnosed with prediabetes by a health professional. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM In the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, a trained Lifestyle Coach will introduce topics during 16 one-hour weekly sessions, in a supportive, small group environment. Participants are encouraged as they explore how healthy eating, physical activity and behavior changes can help reduce their risk for diabetes and benefit their overall health. The Diabetes Prevention Program is shown to prevent or delay new cases of type 2 diabetes by 58 percent and as much as 71 percent in adults over the age of 60. When Helen signed up for the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program, her goal was a better life for herself. But she gained much more than that. By improving her health, she was able to donate a kidney to her mom. Read more how the Y’s DDP program changed these two women's two lives. DO I QUALIFY? To qualify for the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, participants must be at least 18 years old, overweight (BMI>25, Asian Adults BMI>22, and at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes or have been diagnosed with prediabetes. Click here to take the test. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month: Learn To Reduce Risk

Diabetes Awareness Month: Learn To Reduce Risk

November is National Diabetes Awareness month. The Health Management team at the JBER hospital is engaging with clients through activities, such as the display in the hospital lobby during the month of November, as well as health fairs, Diabetes Wellness Education Classes, individual consultation opportunities and much more. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which there is too much sugar in the blood. Blood sugar, or glucose, is controlled by insulin, a hormone the body makes. If you have diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or does not effectively use the insulin it makes. There are two types of diabetes; in Type 1, the body does not produce insulin. This form affects children and young adults. In Type 2, the body does not use insulin properly and cannot make enough of it to control blood sugar. Most people who are diagnosed with diabetes have this form. A person who has diabetes may feel symptoms like excessive thirst, extreme hunger, extreme fatigue, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, tingling, pain, or numbness in hands and/or feet, blurred vision, and sores, cuts, or bruises that are slow to heal. Without proper care, diabetes can cause serious health problems like heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. Do you have diabetes? Are you one of the estimated 86 million people in this country who have pre-diabetes? If you have pre-diabetes, you are at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and also are at increased risk of developing heart disease. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as full-blown diabetes. Those with pre-diabetes are at increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes within a decade unless they adopt a healt Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month 2017

National Diabetes Month 2017

Each November communities across the country observe National Diabetes Month to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day. You are the most important member of your diabetes care team, but you don’t have to manage your diabetes alone. Seek support from health care professionals, your family, friends, and community to manage your diabetes. Watch the video below, and when you’re ready learn more about managing your diabetes. Help Promote National Diabetes Month! We encourage partners, organizations, and health care professionals to use our resources and share our 2017 theme in their communities. Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the Lima Family YMCA is encouraging residents of Allen County to learn their risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to take preventive steps to potentially reduce their chances of developing the disease. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that more than one in three Americans (84 million people) has prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Only 10 percent of those with prediabetes know they have it but with awareness and simple actions, people with prediabetes may prevent the onset of diabetes. “As one of the leading community-based charities committed to improving the health of Allen County, the Y wants to all people to understand their risk for prediabetes and steps to take to avoid developing type 2 diabetes,” said Terri Averesch, Vice President, Lima Family YMCA. “Developing type 2 diabetes not only puts a tremendous strain on our health care system, but impacts the lives of millions of people and their families each year.” Individuals can assess their risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes by taking a simple test at YMCA.net/diabetes. Through this assessment, visitors can also learn how lifestyle choices and family history help determine the ultimate risk for developing the disease. Several factors that could put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes include race, age, weight and activity level. If a person is at risk, a diabetes screening conducted by a physician can confirm a diabetes or prediabetes diagnosis. Lima YMCA is helping to improve health through classes and healthy activities for individuals of all ages and fitness levels. Get yourself and your family started by ma Continue reading >>

Icymi! Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Month Recap

Icymi! Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Month Recap

We’d like to thank everyone, from our writers to our community members, for all of their help spreading awareness this Diabetes Awareness Month. In case you missed it, below is what we did to help spread the word about what its like to live with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes management isn’t easy Many describe type 2 diabetes as challenging, both from a physical and mental health perspective. See the data from our survey in Type 2 Diabetes Management Is NOT A Piece Of Cake. The “how, what, who, when and where” of type 2 diabetes Lindsey shared essential facts, risk factors, signs and symptoms, and ways to get involved for this diabetes awareness month in her article Type 2 Diabetes 101. Toby published A Review of the Action of Diabetes Drugs to give more information on where, in the process of carbohydrate/glucose metabolism, medications act. Rachel reflected on the thirteen years since her diagnosis, including her own management and the challenges she has seen faced by the community. Shelley wrote about the role of her endocrinologist and pharmacist in her diabetes management. What do you wish others understood about life with diabetes? In observance of World Diabetes Day, patient advocates Phyllisa Deroze and Shelley Hlymbicky shared what they wish others knew about what it’s like to live with type 2 diabetes. Ask the experts Our type 2 diabetes experts have weighed in on questions you’ve asked! See their answers to questions across the board in Expert Tips & Tricks for Diabetes Management. We asked, you answered! We were blown away at the responses we received from the community to the questions we asked on Facebook. Thank you for all of your input. To see the comments, click below: Myths and facts Each week, we shared a common myth and associated fact for ou Continue reading >>

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