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Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Month

Uab Medicine News

Uab Medicine News

Alabama has the second worst rate of diabetes in the nation; someone is diagnosed with the chronic disease about every 15 seconds in our state. And rates are rapidly rising. In fact, current statistics suggest that among children born in the past 17 years, 1 in 3 will develop diabetes during their lifetime, and the projected rate for minorities is 1 in 2. The Diabetes and Nutrition Education Clinic at The Kirklin Clinic of UAB Hospital is here to help prevent complications from uncontrolled diabetes by providing information, support, and skills training to help people with diabetes self-manage their condition. Common Myths Education is a critical part of both diabetes prevention and treatment, as there are many misconceptions about the disease. Below, the American Diabetes Association dispels some common myths to help you and your loved ones stay knowledgeable about diabetes. Myth: Diabetes is not that serious of a disease. Fact: Diabetes causes more deaths each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Having diabetes nearly doubles your chance of having a heart attack. The good news is that proper diabetes control can reduce your risk for diabetes complications. Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Fact: The answer is not so simple. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger the onset of the disease. Type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Research has shown that drinking sugary drinks is linked to type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends avoiding sugar-sweetened beverages to help prevent diabetes. These include: Regular sodas Fruit punch Fruit dri Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month 2017

National Diabetes Month 2017

Each November communities across the country observe National Diabetes Month to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day. You are the most important member of your diabetes care team, but you don’t have to manage your diabetes alone. Seek support from health care professionals, your family, friends, and community to manage your diabetes. Watch the video below, and when you’re ready learn more about managing your diabetes. Help Promote National Diabetes Month! We encourage partners, organizations, and health care professionals to use our resources and share our 2017 theme in their communities. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

November is Diabetes Awareness Month! World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated globally on November 14 to raise awareness about both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Join us in celebrating this incredible community all month long — and especially on WDD. Explore the different ways to get involved: by inspiring others, educating peers, knowing your history and giving back. Once-a-day advocacy actions to help us make some noise for National Diabetes Awareness month in November! Tag @beyondtype1 on Twitter, Instagram or Facebook so we can re-share. Use #NDAM #DiabetesAwarenessMonth to join the conversation. Educate A big part of spreading awareness is educating others about what Type 1 diabetes is and isn’t. Education is key to dispelling ignorance around the chronic illness and continuing advocacy for those living with it. You can give a presentation to your school or classroom and we’ll ship you materials. Just sign up and we’ll help you get started! Download the poster: “What is Type 1 Diabetes?” Download the poster: “Warning Signs of Type 1 Diabetes” Check out our cool and shareable fact cards HERE! Get inspired this month by sharing the encouragements of others. Check out our new quote board on Pinterest and start spreading the support by leveraging your social media channels. Type 1 diabetes presents daily challenges that T1Ds and those who love them must learn to navigate. Hopefulness and positivity make those dark days a little easier. Pay homage to the history of diabetes and the progress of technology that eases T1D management. We’ve come a long way since the creation of insulin and are recently celebrating the FDA approval of an “artificial pancreas”. This is a look at where we’ve come from and where we are going in the near future. Celebrate Di Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

As diabetes rates continue to rise, do you know your risk? During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the YMCA of Greater Kansas City is encouraging the community to learn about the risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and adopt healthy habits. Take these three preventive steps to potentially avoid developing the disease: Learn about prediabetes. Assess your risks. Make small changes to your lifestyle. You likely already know someone affected by diabetes or prediabetes, or are affected yourself. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that more than one in three Americans (84 million people) have prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Only 10 percent of those with prediabetes know they have it. But with awareness and simple actions, people with prediabetes may prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Local Impact In Kansas and Missouri we have an opportunity to take charge of our health and educate others about diabetes and prediabetes. Diabetes rates continue to rise, and the rates of people with diabetes and prediabetes in Missouri and Kansas are higher than the national averages. Missouri 13.2 percent of the adult population (approximately 699,992 people), have diabetes, compared to 9.4 percent of the total US population. Of these, an estimated 152,000 have diabetes but don’t know it. 35.9 percent of the adult population (1.6 million people), have prediabetes, compared to 33 percent nationwide. Every year an estimated 32,000 people in Missouri are diagnosed with diabetes. Kansas 12.6 percent of the adult population (approximately 293,860 people), have diabetes, compared to 9.4 percent nationwide. Of these, an estimated 69,000 have d Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

When you have prediabetes, your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal but are not high enough to be called diabetes. But if your blood glucose goes higher, you can develop type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can lead to heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, kidney failure, and eye problems. The good news is you can take steps to delay or prevent diabetes, and heart disease. How can I delay or prevent prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease? You can delay or prevent type 2 diabetes and heart disease — by losing weight through eating fewer calories and less fat and being more active. A study of people at high risk for type 2 diabetes found that people could lower their risk for diabetes. They did this by: losing weight—an average of 15 pounds in the first year of the study eating fewer calories cutting down on foods high in saturated fat exercising about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, usually by walking quicklyThese actions worked for both men and women.What raises my risk for prediabetes and diabetes? You’re at risk if you: are age 45 or older are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander have a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes are overweight are physically inactive If you develop prediabetes, you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. But you can take steps to delay or prevent these conditions: have high blood pressure or if you take medicine for high blood pressure have low HDL cholesterol and/or high triglycerides are a woman who had diabetes during pregnancy have been diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) How can I find out whether I have prediabetes? You can have prediabetes but not know it. You’ll need a blood test to check your blood glucose level. If you’re Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

The JDRF community will be raising awareness about type 1 diabetes (T1D) throughout the month of November. We’ll kick things off on T1Day, November 1, 2017, by telling our stories to the world. Every minute of every day, people with T1D persevere in the face of adversity. JDRF is committed to making day-to-day life with the disease easier, safer and healthier while working toward ways to cure and prevent T1D once and for all. This November, we are continuing our T1D Looks Like Me campaign to spread awareness about life with T1D. Visit our website or follow us on social media to “Get Quizzed by a Whiz Kid” and test your knowledge against that of a nine-year-old with T1D. You can also create a custom “T1D Looks Like Me” profile photo for social media or generate your unique “T1D Footprint.” You can post your footprint image to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to shed light on the cumulative burden of finger pricks, injections and other disruptions that come with living with T1D. JDRF will also continue our important advocacy efforts throughout the month. We are asking Congress to continue funding critical research through the Special Diabetes Program and pressuring insurers to guarantee that everyone has the Coverage 2 Control their T1D. Check back with us on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2017, and throughout the month for more blogs, stories and ways to share what it means to be affected by T1D. Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the Lima Family YMCA is encouraging residents of Allen County to learn their risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to take preventive steps to potentially reduce their chances of developing the disease. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that more than one in three Americans (84 million people) has prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Only 10 percent of those with prediabetes know they have it but with awareness and simple actions, people with prediabetes may prevent the onset of diabetes. “As one of the leading community-based charities committed to improving the health of Allen County, the Y wants to all people to understand their risk for prediabetes and steps to take to avoid developing type 2 diabetes,” said Terri Averesch, Vice President, Lima Family YMCA. “Developing type 2 diabetes not only puts a tremendous strain on our health care system, but impacts the lives of millions of people and their families each year.” Individuals can assess their risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes by taking a simple test at YMCA.net/diabetes. Through this assessment, visitors can also learn how lifestyle choices and family history help determine the ultimate risk for developing the disease. Several factors that could put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes include race, age, weight and activity level. If a person is at risk, a diabetes screening conducted by a physician can confirm a diabetes or prediabetes diagnosis. Lima YMCA is helping to improve health through classes and healthy activities for individuals of all ages and fitness levels. Get yourself and your family started by ma Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes is one of the most common and dangerous health problems facing Americans today. It occurs when the body is unable to control how the body uses sugar for energy and the amount of sugar in the blood rises. When untreated, the high sugar levels can lead to many serious problems including painful burning or numbness in the hands and feet, vision problems and blindness, kidney disease, heart attacks, strokes, blood flow problems resulting in amputations of toes and feet, coma and death. There are different types of diabetes. Type 1 (formerly called Juvenile Diabetes), most commonly starts in childhood. The cause of this of Type 1 diabetes is unknown. It occurs when the cells in the body that produce insulin die off. Insulin is the hormone that helps the cells of the body use blood sugar for energy. Without insulin, sugar cannot get into cells. Children and adults with Type 1 diabetes require insulin shots to help control their blood sugar levels. These shots are usually given several times per day. Because the cause is unknown, there is no way to prevent Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the cells in the body stop responding to normal insulin levels, causing blood sugar levels to build up. Type 2 diabetes can be treated with pills that must be taken once or twice every day. Many people need more than one type of pill and some will need pills and insulin or shots of another type of shot to help the body use and control blood sugar levels. Risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes are well known including: Having a family member with diabetes. Being overweight or obese. Not doing enough exercise or physical activity. Smoking. For women, high blood sugar during a pregnancy. Asians, Latinos and African-Americans are also more likely to get diabetes than whi Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Month

American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. One in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people. And another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news? People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. How can American Diabetes Month make a difference? We can use this month to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. Here are just a few ideas: Encourage people to make small changes, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Talk to people in your community about getting regular checkups. They can get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked, and ask the doctor about their diabetes risk. Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity. How can I help spread the word? We’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example: Continue reading >>

November Diabetes Awareness Month

November Diabetes Awareness Month

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and there are some simple steps that you can take to avoid diabetes and its complications. Taking small steps can have huge impacts! Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. One in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people and another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This means about half the adult population have prediabetes or diabetes. The good news! People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. How sweet is your blood? Over the last decade the incidence of new onset diagnosed diabetes in U.S. adults has increased by 90% (1). Although there has been a steady rise in type 2 diabetes, the rate of increase markedly changed around 1990 (2). Interestingly, this rate of rise parallels the rate of increase in chemical production and consumption of increasingly calorically dense processed foods. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 84 million Americans are living with prediabetes, yet almost 90 percent don’t know they have it. This means they may be unaware of the long-term health risks associated with progressing to type 2 diabetes and the increased risks of heart attack and stroke (3). Diabetes is a condition when your blood becomes too sweet, that is too say, that your body is no longer able to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Although there are many factors involved in the development of diabetes the simple Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

2017 is coming to an end, but this message still rings true for this and every year. November is Diabetes Awareness Month and these simple suggestions can help you prevent prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes and manage all diabetes types-Type 1, Type 2, gestational and MODY, maturity-onset diabetes of the young. For families living with all types of diabetes, the holidays can be challenging. Rich side dishes and desserts can wreak havoc on your waistline and glucose levels. Alcohol packs of calories and pounds-especially cocktails with sugar. Speaking with a registered dietitian and with your endocrinologist can help you stay safe and keep your glucose levels within normal limits during these festive times. For families of Type 1 diabetic patients, well-meaning friends and family frequently offer advice and suggestions that can be dangerous. Far too many people don’t really understand the difference between Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that requires insulin injection, and Type 2 diabetes, a disease managed with oral meds, insulin or both. But that doesn’t stop them from giving unsolicited advice. Eliminating carbohydrates for anyone on a basal insulin dose can be deadly. Eating food that doesn’t have a nutrition label can be challenging when calculating bolus insulin doses. Hypoglycemia can be especially dangerous if you skip meals, or inject too much insulin.Shaming Type 1 adults and kids because of a ‘bad” glucose level does more harm than good. Focusing on healthy meals with a balance of complex carbohydrates, good fats and lots of vegetables are the keys to sound nutrition. And yes, you can eat dessert like everyone else. Moderation is the key for everyone at the dinner table. And during the holidays, get outside. Physical activity is recommended an Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the YMCA of the Triangle is encouraging residents to learn their risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to take preventive steps to potentially reduce their chances of developing the disease. 1 IN 3 NORTH CAROLINIANS HAVE PREDIABETES It is estimated that more than 2.5 million North Carolinians may have prediabetes, that's 1 in 3 people. Only about 9 percent of the population report having been diagnosed with prediabetes by a health professional. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM In the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, a trained Lifestyle Coach will introduce topics during 16 one-hour weekly sessions, in a supportive, small group environment. Participants are encouraged as they explore how healthy eating, physical activity and behavior changes can help reduce their risk for diabetes and benefit their overall health. The Diabetes Prevention Program is shown to prevent or delay new cases of type 2 diabetes by 58 percent and as much as 71 percent in adults over the age of 60. When Helen signed up for the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program, her goal was a better life for herself. But she gained much more than that. By improving her health, she was able to donate a kidney to her mom. Read more how the Y’s DDP program changed these two women's two lives. DO I QUALIFY? To qualify for the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, participants must be at least 18 years old, overweight (BMI>25, Asian Adults BMI>22, and at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes or have been diagnosed with prediabetes. Click here to take the test. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month: Learn To Reduce Risk

Diabetes Awareness Month: Learn To Reduce Risk

November is National Diabetes Awareness month. The Health Management team at the JBER hospital is engaging with clients through activities, such as the display in the hospital lobby during the month of November, as well as health fairs, Diabetes Wellness Education Classes, individual consultation opportunities and much more. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which there is too much sugar in the blood. Blood sugar, or glucose, is controlled by insulin, a hormone the body makes. If you have diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or does not effectively use the insulin it makes. There are two types of diabetes; in Type 1, the body does not produce insulin. This form affects children and young adults. In Type 2, the body does not use insulin properly and cannot make enough of it to control blood sugar. Most people who are diagnosed with diabetes have this form. A person who has diabetes may feel symptoms like excessive thirst, extreme hunger, extreme fatigue, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, tingling, pain, or numbness in hands and/or feet, blurred vision, and sores, cuts, or bruises that are slow to heal. Without proper care, diabetes can cause serious health problems like heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. Do you have diabetes? Are you one of the estimated 86 million people in this country who have pre-diabetes? If you have pre-diabetes, you are at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and also are at increased risk of developing heart disease. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as full-blown diabetes. Those with pre-diabetes are at increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes within a decade unless they adopt a healt Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

[November 2017] – During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the Marshalltown YMCA-YWCA is encouraging residents in Central Iowa to learn their risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to take preventive steps to potentially reduce their chances of developing the disease. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that more than one in three Americans (84 million people) has prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Only 10 percent of those with prediabetes know they have it but with awareness and simple actions, people with prediabetes may prevent the onset of diabetes. “As one of the leading community-based charities committed to improving the health of our community, the Y wants all people to understand their risk for prediabetes and steps to take to avoid developing type 2 diabetes,” said Heidi Draisey, Marshalltown Y Health & Wellness Coordinator. “Developing type 2 diabetes not only puts a tremendous strain on our health care system, but impacts the lives of millions of people and their families each year.” Individuals can assess their risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes by taking a simple test at YMCA.net/diabetes. Through this assessment, visitors can also learn how lifestyle choices and family history help determine the ultimate risk for developing the disease. Several factors that could put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes include race, age, weight and activity level. If a person is at risk, a diabetes screening conducted by a physician can confirm a diabetes or prediabetes diagnosis. The Marshalltown YMCA-YWCA is helping to improve health through programs and services for all ages. The YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Continue reading >>

A Special Offer For You During Diabetes Awareness Month 2015

A Special Offer For You During Diabetes Awareness Month 2015

This month is National Diabetes Awareness Month. At Glooko, we eat, sleep and breathe diabetes everyday. Many of us either live with diabetes personally, or our close family members do. Diabetes is a personal passion at Glooko and making the lives of people with diabetes a little bit easier is something we strive to do everyday. For National Diabetes Awareness Month we wanted to share some diabetes facts that we found interesting, informative and a few of them, even funny! We hope this list is educational to you. We picked a new fact for each day. Feel free to tweet the fact or share them with a friend. This month, we are also offering a DEEP discount on the Glooko individual subscription. It comes with the MeterSync Blue, our unique technology that allows us to extract the data from your blood glucose meter, pump and cgm and annual access to Glooko. Use the code: AWARENESS2015 to get your first-year's subscription at 50% off - today! Date Diabetes Fact Source November 1 1 in 12 people in the world have diabetes IDF November 2 In the U.S., a new case of diabetes is diagnosed every 30 seconds IDF November 3 Worldwide Diabetes Day is on 11/14, the birthday of Sir Frederick Grant Banting. He and his team discovered insulin in 1922 and received the Nobel prize for it in 1923 Nobel Prize Facts November 4 Rick, the Glooko CEO has a BMI of 24. He has a 3% chance of having diabetes, if he were Chinese, he would have a 13% chance Diabetes in China November 5 In 1935 Roger Hinsworth discovered there were two types of diabetes: “insulin sensitive” (type 1) and “insulin insensitive” (type 2) Diabetes Health November 6 In 1961 the first single use syringe was introduced. While it seems like a minor innovation today, before this product people used the same glass syringe mult Continue reading >>

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