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Type 2 Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

When you have prediabetes, your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal but are not high enough to be called diabetes. But if your blood glucose goes higher, you can develop type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can lead to heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, kidney failure, and eye problems. The good news is you can take steps to delay or prevent diabetes, and heart disease. How can I delay or prevent prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease? You can delay or prevent type 2 diabetes and heart disease — by losing weight through eating fewer calories and less fat and being more active. A study of people at high risk for type 2 diabetes found that people could lower their risk for diabetes. They did this by: losing weight—an average of 15 pounds in the first year of the study eating fewer calories cutting down on foods high in saturated fat exercising about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, usually by walking quicklyThese actions worked for both men and women.What raises my risk for prediabetes and diabetes? You’re at risk if you: are age 45 or older are African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander have a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes are overweight are physically inactive If you develop prediabetes, you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. But you can take steps to delay or prevent these conditions: have high blood pressure or if you take medicine for high blood pressure have low HDL cholesterol and/or high triglycerides are a woman who had diabetes during pregnancy have been diagnosed with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) How can I find out whether I have prediabetes? You can have prediabetes but not know it. You’ll need a blood test to check your blood glucose level. If you’re Continue reading >>

Uab Medicine News

Uab Medicine News

Alabama has the second worst rate of diabetes in the nation; someone is diagnosed with the chronic disease about every 15 seconds in our state. And rates are rapidly rising. In fact, current statistics suggest that among children born in the past 17 years, 1 in 3 will develop diabetes during their lifetime, and the projected rate for minorities is 1 in 2. The Diabetes and Nutrition Education Clinic at The Kirklin Clinic of UAB Hospital is here to help prevent complications from uncontrolled diabetes by providing information, support, and skills training to help people with diabetes self-manage their condition. Common Myths Education is a critical part of both diabetes prevention and treatment, as there are many misconceptions about the disease. Below, the American Diabetes Association dispels some common myths to help you and your loved ones stay knowledgeable about diabetes. Myth: Diabetes is not that serious of a disease. Fact: Diabetes causes more deaths each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Having diabetes nearly doubles your chance of having a heart attack. The good news is that proper diabetes control can reduce your risk for diabetes complications. Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Fact: The answer is not so simple. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger the onset of the disease. Type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight does increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Research has shown that drinking sugary drinks is linked to type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends avoiding sugar-sweetened beverages to help prevent diabetes. These include: Regular sodas Fruit punch Fruit dri Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the Lima Family YMCA is encouraging residents of Allen County to learn their risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to take preventive steps to potentially reduce their chances of developing the disease. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that more than one in three Americans (84 million people) has prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Only 10 percent of those with prediabetes know they have it but with awareness and simple actions, people with prediabetes may prevent the onset of diabetes. “As one of the leading community-based charities committed to improving the health of Allen County, the Y wants to all people to understand their risk for prediabetes and steps to take to avoid developing type 2 diabetes,” said Terri Averesch, Vice President, Lima Family YMCA. “Developing type 2 diabetes not only puts a tremendous strain on our health care system, but impacts the lives of millions of people and their families each year.” Individuals can assess their risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes by taking a simple test at YMCA.net/diabetes. Through this assessment, visitors can also learn how lifestyle choices and family history help determine the ultimate risk for developing the disease. Several factors that could put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes include race, age, weight and activity level. If a person is at risk, a diabetes screening conducted by a physician can confirm a diabetes or prediabetes diagnosis. Lima YMCA is helping to improve health through classes and healthy activities for individuals of all ages and fitness levels. Get yourself and your family started by ma Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Awareness Month

National Diabetes Awareness Month

In case you weren’t aware, November is National Diabetes Awareness month. Why am I dedicating an entire post to that? My youngest son, Calvin, is a Type 1 Diabetic. I want to share more about diabetes because 1.) people have asked me for updates and 2.) T1D is sneaky and knowing the symptoms can save someone’s life. So, even if you don’t give a hoot about diabetes, just read the symptoms and store that away in the recesses of your brain. Not to be dramatic, but it really might save the life of someone you know. I am convinced that Calvin was diagnosed early, before he was in real trouble, because my mom knew the symptoms. First of all a few details about T1D. Most people are familiar with type 2 diabetes, since most people with diabetes have type 2. Less than 10% of diabetics have type 1 and only 15% of those with T1D are children. Almost all of the “diabetic-friendly” foods, recipe books, magazines, and general information is geared towards type 2, so there is a lot of misunderstanding about type 1. Type 2 diabetes is when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or develops a resistance to it. It sometimes needs to be treated with insulin injections, but can also be treated with oral medications and controlled diet. Type 2 can, in most cases, be reversed with a change in diet and activity, along with weight loss. T1D cannot be prevented and it cannot be reversed. It is an auto-immune disease. The body attacks and kills off the beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin, until the pancreas no longer has enough beta cells to produce insulin. It’s a gradual process that starts happening long before symptoms manifest. Right now there isn’t a cure, only 24/7 management. And, as a T1D mom, I can attest to the fact that it is 24/7. One thing you don’t Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the YMCA of the Triangle is encouraging residents to learn their risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to take preventive steps to potentially reduce their chances of developing the disease. 1 IN 3 NORTH CAROLINIANS HAVE PREDIABETES It is estimated that more than 2.5 million North Carolinians may have prediabetes, that's 1 in 3 people. Only about 9 percent of the population report having been diagnosed with prediabetes by a health professional. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM In the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, a trained Lifestyle Coach will introduce topics during 16 one-hour weekly sessions, in a supportive, small group environment. Participants are encouraged as they explore how healthy eating, physical activity and behavior changes can help reduce their risk for diabetes and benefit their overall health. The Diabetes Prevention Program is shown to prevent or delay new cases of type 2 diabetes by 58 percent and as much as 71 percent in adults over the age of 60. When Helen signed up for the YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program, her goal was a better life for herself. But she gained much more than that. By improving her health, she was able to donate a kidney to her mom. Read more how the Y’s DDP program changed these two women's two lives. DO I QUALIFY? To qualify for the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program, participants must be at least 18 years old, overweight (BMI>25, Asian Adults BMI>22, and at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes or have been diagnosed with prediabetes. Click here to take the test. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month: Learn To Reduce Risk

Diabetes Awareness Month: Learn To Reduce Risk

November is National Diabetes Awareness month. The Health Management team at the JBER hospital is engaging with clients through activities, such as the display in the hospital lobby during the month of November, as well as health fairs, Diabetes Wellness Education Classes, individual consultation opportunities and much more. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which there is too much sugar in the blood. Blood sugar, or glucose, is controlled by insulin, a hormone the body makes. If you have diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or does not effectively use the insulin it makes. There are two types of diabetes; in Type 1, the body does not produce insulin. This form affects children and young adults. In Type 2, the body does not use insulin properly and cannot make enough of it to control blood sugar. Most people who are diagnosed with diabetes have this form. A person who has diabetes may feel symptoms like excessive thirst, extreme hunger, extreme fatigue, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, tingling, pain, or numbness in hands and/or feet, blurred vision, and sores, cuts, or bruises that are slow to heal. Without proper care, diabetes can cause serious health problems like heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. Do you have diabetes? Are you one of the estimated 86 million people in this country who have pre-diabetes? If you have pre-diabetes, you are at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and also are at increased risk of developing heart disease. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as full-blown diabetes. Those with pre-diabetes are at increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes within a decade unless they adopt a healt Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

Prevention and early treatment are the keys to preventing the serious problems that can result from diabetes. Learn how to manage diabetes by attending a one on one Diabetes Self-Management Education Program at Madison County Memorial Hospital. The program is covered by most health insurance policies. Our Diabetes Education Program has been Nationally Recognized and Certified since 2000. Our Certified Diabetes Educators, Becky Paxton, RN CDE and Linda Klejch RD, CDE are available at 515-462-5218. We thank the American Diabetes Association for providing the following information. Did you know that 1 in 11 Americans today has diabetes? Despite its prevalence, diabetes is an invisible disease. It affects men and women, people young and old, and people of all races, shapes and sizes. Often there are no outward signs from the 29 million Americans who fight this chronic illness every day. That’s why there is a critical need to foster awareness and education while breaking down stereotypes, myths and misunderstandings about this growing public health crisis that affects so many of us. Here’s the facts! One in eleven Americans has diabetes today! Every 23 seconds someone in the US is diagnosed with Diabetes! 86 Million Americans are at risk for diabetes! Diabetes causes more deaths than AIDS and Breast Cancer Combined! This is exactly why the American Diabetes Association marks each November as American Diabetes Month—to bring extra attention to the disease and the tens of millions of people affected by it. Diabetes is more than the medications and devices used to manage it. For many, diabetes dictates how they organize their day, what they eat at every meal, how they choose to be physically active and how they spend their money. People with diabetes can have health care Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes Awareness Month

2017 is coming to an end, but this message still rings true for this and every year. November is Diabetes Awareness Month and these simple suggestions can help you prevent prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes and manage all diabetes types-Type 1, Type 2, gestational and MODY, maturity-onset diabetes of the young. For families living with all types of diabetes, the holidays can be challenging. Rich side dishes and desserts can wreak havoc on your waistline and glucose levels. Alcohol packs of calories and pounds-especially cocktails with sugar. Speaking with a registered dietitian and with your endocrinologist can help you stay safe and keep your glucose levels within normal limits during these festive times. For families of Type 1 diabetic patients, well-meaning friends and family frequently offer advice and suggestions that can be dangerous. Far too many people don’t really understand the difference between Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder that requires insulin injection, and Type 2 diabetes, a disease managed with oral meds, insulin or both. But that doesn’t stop them from giving unsolicited advice. Eliminating carbohydrates for anyone on a basal insulin dose can be deadly. Eating food that doesn’t have a nutrition label can be challenging when calculating bolus insulin doses. Hypoglycemia can be especially dangerous if you skip meals, or inject too much insulin.Shaming Type 1 adults and kids because of a ‘bad” glucose level does more harm than good. Focusing on healthy meals with a balance of complex carbohydrates, good fats and lots of vegetables are the keys to sound nutrition. And yes, you can eat dessert like everyone else. Moderation is the key for everyone at the dinner table. And during the holidays, get outside. Physical activity is recommended an Continue reading >>

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. The Basics More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant, which can put the pregnancy and baby at risk and lead to type 2 diabetes later). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; about 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. More than 30 million US adults have diabetes—and 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. At least 1 out of 3 people will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. Risk of death for adults with diabetes is 50% higher than for adults without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month 2017

National Diabetes Month 2017

Each November communities across the country observe National Diabetes Month to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day. You are the most important member of your diabetes care team, but you don’t have to manage your diabetes alone. Seek support from health care professionals, your family, friends, and community to manage your diabetes. Watch the video below, and when you’re ready learn more about managing your diabetes. Help Promote National Diabetes Month! We encourage partners, organizations, and health care professionals to use our resources and share our 2017 theme in their communities. Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, diabetes affects approximately 30 million people nationwide. It is a chronic disease in which blood glucose (sugar) levels are above normal. In general, people with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. There are two types of diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes, formally called juvenile diabetes, is a disease of the immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection. With this type of diabetes the insulin-producing cells (beta cells) are attacked by the immune system preventing the pancreas from being able to produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease and is common in adults, but can occur at any age. Type 1 diabetes is not contagious and there is no known cause. However, there are genetic and environmental factors that may increase the risk. Eighty-five to 90 percent of people with Type 1 diabetes don’t have a family member with the disease. Unlike Type 2 diabetes, Type 1 has nothing to do with weight or fitness levels, although keeping a healthy weight and diet will help manage the disease. To help bring awareness to this disease we are spotlighting one of our own students here at Sullivan High School. Charlie Neal is 17 years old and a junior at Sullivan High School. When Charlie was 12 years old he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. His first symptoms included feeling tired and extremely thirsty. His mother thought he was experiencing bad mood swings and depression because all he wanted to do was sleep. One day at school he passed out in the hallway and was taken to the nurse’s office. His mother picked him up from school and took him directly to the Emergency Department, where it was discovered his blood glucose level was Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

Each issue, WebMD the Magazine's "Health Highlights" focuses on a national health theme for the month with expert tips, reader comments, and eye-catching factoids. November is Diabetes Awareness month. Follow these tips to stay at your peak! 1. Say "Om" Learn to meditate to help reduce stress and improve your blood sugar levels. 2. Step Out Exercise helps keep your weight and blood sugar under control, and just about everyone can do a brisk daily walk. 3. Eat Right Follow your food plan. If you don't have one, ask your doctor about seeing a dietitian who specializes in diabetes. 4. Jet Set Before you hit the road, get a checkup, pack extra meds, and plan your doses around time zone changes. 5. Hang 10 Drop 10% of your body weight through diet and exercise. 6. Trade Up Swap saturated fats and refined sugar for healthy fats in nuts and sweet whole fruit. 7. See Clearly Diabetes complications can cause vision loss or blindness. Schedule a full eye exam at least once a year. 8. Stand Up You may not feel foot injuries, so check both feet daily for blisters, cuts, or sores. 9. Show Color Pack your plate with a palette of greens, yellows, and reds -- like spinach, squash, and tomatoes. 10. Learn More Visit WebMD's Diabetes Center for news, tips, a blood sugar tracker, and more. Tips from Adrian Vella, MD, endocrinologist, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Use the web or your smartphone to help you manage what you eat. Online tools can help you keep track of your calorie consumption, aid in meal planning, and provide important nutrition information to help you make healthy choices. Get a pedometer. People with diabetes need to exercise. For many of my patients, that means walking. Set a goal. Tips from Deborah J. Wexler, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and much government and media attention is focused on the need to slow the growing “epidemic” of diabetes and prediabetes in the United States. Efforts to this end include the American Diabetes Association’s Stop Diabetes campaign, which encourages people to take an online risk test to assess their personal risk of developing prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes and to see a doctor if their test results suggest a high risk. But what if you already have diabetes? Is there anything in National Diabetes Month for you? Of course there is! For people who already have diabetes, it’s as good a time as any to take a look at your diabetes management and ask yourself how things are going. Are there areas that need improvement? Are you interested in connecting with other people who have diabetes? Would you like to participate in a diabetes fundraiser? Would you like to learn something new? Here are some suggestions for making the most of a month devoted to diabetes. 1. Commit to a new healthy habit for one month. Many lifestyle habits — not just eating and exercising — can affect your general health and your diabetes management. Some may affect your blood glucose levels directly, and others may have a more indirect effect, enabling or preventing you from carrying out your daily routines, for example. Rather than choose something you feel you “should” do, pick something you feel able and willing to do. Here are some ideas: Get more sleep. Not getting enough sleep can increase insulin resistance, meaning your body requires more insulin to get glucose into your cells. This can lead to higher blood glucose levels and is believed to have other negative health effects. Inadequate sleep also tends to leave you feeling fatigued during the day Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

During National Diabetes Awareness Month, the YMCA is encouraging people to learn their risks for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to take preventive steps to potentially reduce their chances of developing the disease. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that more than one in three Americans (84 million people) has prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood glucose is elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Only 10 percent of those with prediabetes know they have it but with awareness and simple actions, people with prediabetes may prevent the onset of diabetes. “As one of the leading charitable nonprofits committed to improving the health of our community, the Y wants all people to understand their risk for prediabetes and steps to take to avoid developing type 2 diabetes,” said Karen Bartoletti, vice president, Health Strategies for the YMCA of Northwest North Carolina. “Developing type 2 diabetes not only puts a tremendous strain on our health care system, but impacts the lives of millions of people and their families each year.” Individuals can assess their risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes by taking a simple test at YMCA.net/diabetes. Through this assessment, visitors can also learn how lifestyle choices and family history help determine the ultimate risk for developing the disease. Several factors that could put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes include race, age, weight and activity level. If a person is at risk, a diabetes screening conducted by a physician can confirm a diabetes or prediabetes diagnosis. Making some basic lifestyle changes that contribute to weight loss and healthy living can decrease the risk for type 2 diabetes. Among these are: • Eat fruits Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

The JDRF community will be raising awareness about type 1 diabetes (T1D) throughout the month of November. We’ll kick things off on T1Day, November 1, 2017, by telling our stories to the world. Every minute of every day, people with T1D persevere in the face of adversity. JDRF is committed to making day-to-day life with the disease easier, safer and healthier while working toward ways to cure and prevent T1D once and for all. This November, we are continuing our T1D Looks Like Me campaign to spread awareness about life with T1D. Visit our website or follow us on social media to “Get Quizzed by a Whiz Kid” and test your knowledge against that of a nine-year-old with T1D. You can also create a custom “T1D Looks Like Me” profile photo for social media or generate your unique “T1D Footprint.” You can post your footprint image to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to shed light on the cumulative burden of finger pricks, injections and other disruptions that come with living with T1D. JDRF will also continue our important advocacy efforts throughout the month. We are asking Congress to continue funding critical research through the Special Diabetes Program and pressuring insurers to guarantee that everyone has the Coverage 2 Control their T1D. Check back with us on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2017, and throughout the month for more blogs, stories and ways to share what it means to be affected by T1D. Continue reading >>

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