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Type 2 Diabetes And Mood Swings In Men

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes Prone To Violence?

Are People With Diabetes Prone To Violence?

Most people with insulin dependent diabetes have experienced the slipping, sliding loss of control and reason. A few units of insulin too many – an accidental overdose – can trigger a hypoglycemic episode. These experiences vary from person to person. In the case of Mike Hoskins, who lives with Type 1 diabetes, it can get pretty bad. Aliens invade. Conspiracy theories march through his mind. His wife wakes up at the middle of the night at risk of physical violence, because once his levels sink below 40, Mike bites, hits, and scratches. When he turns violent, they have a plan of action. “My wife, she’s smaller than I am. So we have a standing rule when I get uncooperative or even violent, she’ll call the paramedics.” Fortunately, this hasn’t happened in a few years, because Mike uses a continuous glucose monitor to alert him of dangerous lows. Hallucinations and aggressive violence are not part of everyone’s reaction to a dangerously low blood sugar. I, for example, tend to fall mute and still, paralyzed by confusion. Anyone who has experienced severe hypoglycemia knows the powerful effects of the condition. But is severe hypoglycemia the only cause of aggressive behavior related to diabetes? Several recent scientific studies have examined aggressive behavior and propose more facets to the relationship between blood sugar, exertion of self-control, and aggression. Some research even suggests that due to problems metabolizing glucose, people with diabetes are more prone to aggressive behavior and violent crime, including murder, rape, and robbery. Self-Control: A Finite Resource The most recent study of the relationship between blood sugar and aggression, published earlier this year, “Low glucose relates to greater aggression in married couples,” recei Continue reading >>

13 Hidden Signs You Could Have Type-2 Diabetes

13 Hidden Signs You Could Have Type-2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. While most people with type-1 diabetes are born with it, type-2 can come on at any time. With type-2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. If diabetes is left untreated the glucose starts to build up in the blood instead of heading straight for the cells. If the blood sugar gets too high or too low, health complications arise. Here are 13 signs that you might have type-2 diabetes: 1. EXCESSIVE THRIST Feeling constantly thirsty is one of the most common symptoms of diabetes. It's usually coupled with dryness in the mouth and can be one of the first signs to develop. 2. HUNGER A sudden increase in appetite, particularly sweet cravings, can also be a symptom of the condition. This is because of the really high or really low blood sugar levels. When your blood sugar levels dip, this sends the signal to the body that you need to eat something, which explains hunger pangs at any time of the day. 3. WEIGHT LOSS If you are eating more but seem to be losing weight this could be an indication that something isn't right. Because your body lacks insulin or it’s becoming insulin-sensitive, it can't transport blood sugar into the muscle cells. As a result, your blood sugar level becomes alarmingly high and all the excess sugar goes into your urine. Hence, the weight loss. 4. FREQUENT TOILET BREAKS If you seem to need to pee constantly, this could by a symptom too. Frequent urination is one of the major symptoms of both type-1 and type-2 diabetes. When there are abnormally high blood sugar levels, some of the ex Continue reading >>

How Will Age-related Hormone Changes Affect You?

How Will Age-related Hormone Changes Affect You?

If you have diabetes, you know lots of things -- from eating too much, to missing a snack, to plain old stress -- can affect your blood sugar. But did you know just getting older could make it harder to control? There’s a lot going on in your body as you age. If you become more of a couch potato as you get up in years, you may gain weight. This lack of exercise and the extra pounds can send your blood sugar levels too high. And as you age, your body doesn’t use the insulin it makes as well as it did when you were younger. Your body also starts making less of some hormones, including the human growth hormone. Women will create less estrogen and progesterone, and men often produce less of the sex hormone testosterone. And as you get older, you may be more prone to illness and infections that can spike your blood sugar. Don’t worry too much, though. Middle age doesn’t mean you have to make dramatic changes to control your diabetes. It’s just good to be aware of things that might pop up. The Outlook for Women As women get older, hormone changes before and during menopause often cause hot flashes, irritability, and trouble sleeping. Not only do these drops or spikes in the hormones impact your mood and life, but they can also affect your blood sugar. These ups and downs mean may mean you have to test your levels and make adjustments more often. If you have type 1 diabetes, you may notice low blood sugar levels more often as you get closer to menopause. This can be a sign that your hormones are going down and you may need more insulin. It’s important to know the difference between low blood sugar and moodiness or other perimenopause symptoms. You may reach menopause early if you have type 1 diabetes, but if you’re overweight and have type 2, your changes could s Continue reading >>

Are Diabetics Angry...?

Are Diabetics Angry...?

(See Also: Diabetes and Anger -- Is there a Deeper Connection?) This angry diabetic has been really bewildered for the past few weeks with many new and personal challenges... As we know, life's problems do not stop at diabetes, or any other chronic illness, nor do they care if we're having to juggle other things. In fact, in the storm of life... sometimes when it rains, it just pours. (I need to buy a raincoat.) So, I thought... why not take a little time to address a common, and often overlooked, issue with diabetes? Anger. In the past few weeks, my blog has registered many, many Google searches for "anger and diabetes," "do diabetics suffer from anger," "do diabetics need anger management," etc. I fear many of these folks might be family members really wanting to understand, and care for their loved ones... or maybe folks just wanting to understand themselves a little better. Before I get a little further into the discussion, I want to add that while the emotions we experience through the ups and downs of illness, and life, are perfectly normal... this blog post is in NO WAY a justification for aggression, violence, or abuse. It might be an EXPLANATION of a course of events, but in the end... we are responsible for our own selves, and how we manage our health, and our emotions. Got that? Okay... :) Diabetes is a PERVASIVE disease... Now, in order to make some of kind of sense of the emotions a person with diabetes might feel, we need to understand one thing: Diabetes is a PERVASIVE life change. It is one of the most pervasive life changes an 'afflicted' person will ever have to face. While it may not seem as such in the beginning stages (especially for type 2, and often during a "honeymoon phase" for a type 1), with time, an individual will soon become painfully aware Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I am on two different types of insulin, NovoLog and Levemir (insulin detemir). Can diabetes have any bearing on mood swings or sudden “bad mood episodes”? Continue reading >>

This Is Often The First Symptom Of Type-2 Diabetes – Make Sure You Know The Warning Sign

This Is Often The First Symptom Of Type-2 Diabetes – Make Sure You Know The Warning Sign

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. People with type-1 diabetes tend to be born with it, but type-2 can develop at any stage. With type-2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. It’s important to pick up on the warning signs early because if diabetes is left untreated the glucose starts to build up in the blood instead of heading straight for the cells. If the blood sugar gets too high or too low, serious health complications arise. What is usually the first warning sign of type-2 diabetes? Extreme thirst is one of the first noticeable symptoms of diabetes for most patients, according to healthline.com. High blood pressure, which is a symptom of type-2 diabetes, causes thirst and frequent urination. If you can’t seem to quench your thirst and you are constantly rushing to the toilet, you should get checked out by your GP. Here are five other early warning signs of type-2 diabetes: 1. HUNGER A sudden increase in appetite, particularly sweet craving. 2. WEIGHT LOSS Unexplained weight loss could be a sign of type-2 diabetes. 3. MOOD CHANGES Unless you are pregnant or going through the menopause, mood swings could be a sign of the illness. 4. FOOT NUMBNESS OR PAIN Experiencing numbness and loss of strength in your feet can also be a warning sign. 5. WOUNDS THAT ARE SLOW TO HEAL If you do have type-2 diabetes, you might notice that your wounds don't heal as quickly as other people. Who is most at risk of type-2 diabetes? 1. Your risk increases with age. You are more likely to get type-2 diabetes of you're white and over 40. 2. If there i Continue reading >>

For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly

For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly

Research statistics show that when it comes to their own health, men have fewer checkups with a regular healthcare provider than do women. They remain unaware of the often hidden dangers of obesity, high blood pressure, depression, sexual dysfunction, and diabetes. Historically, men have not been forthcoming about their health, particularly conditions like diabetes, depression, or sexual dysfunction. But today, many men are waking up to the fact that good health and longer life demand positive, consistent action. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) advocates that every person diagnosed with diabetes should learn all they can about their disease and how to manage it. Adopting a "modern man" approach, the American Diabetes Association is encouraging men to get a strong grip on their diabetes and related conditions, actively engage their healthcare providers, and manage their health. By doing so, they can improve and lengthen their lives in three major, related areas that diabetes impacts: Physical Health: Diabetes causes heart disease, and damages the nerves and kidneys. If not properly diagnosed or treated, it can lead to amputation, blindness, and even death. Mental Health: To feel "down" once in a while is normal. But to feel this way for two or more weeks is a sign of serious depression. And studies show that people with diabetes are at greater risk for depression than those without it. Sexual Health: Diabetes can affect sexual function. Some men with diabetes suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED). Low testosterone, which is twice as common in men with type 2 diabetes as those without, can trigger ED and a diminished interest in sex. It can also lead to reduced muscle mass, mood swings, and fatigue. Fortunately, men can overcome these challenges from diabet Continue reading >>

Domestic Violence, Anger, And Diabetes

Domestic Violence, Anger, And Diabetes

By Debra Manzella, RN | Reviewed by a board-certified physician You may be wondering if anger is a normal part of dealing with diabetes. Is it normal for someone with type 1 diabetes to erupt into violent anger and take it out on his or her partner? Frustration and anger are often experienced by people who deal with chronic illnesses like diabetes. Fluctuating blood glucose levels can also contribute to mood swings and cause people to exhibit angry behavior. But when does that kind of anger cross the line into domestic abuse? Anger and frustration can be common reactions when someone has a chronic disease like diabetes . It's a lot to cope with, and at times it may really be upsetting to have to deal with diabetes day after day for a lifetime. Plus, physiologically, when someone's blood sugar fluctuates, spikes, or drops, it can produce feelings of anger, anxiety, or depression that are really out of the control of the person experiencing them. Your partner's diabetes may make it easier for you to overlook or make excuses for angry reactions , which is okay to an extent. However, anger that escalates into physical, verbal, or emotional abuse is not a normal reaction. Every person has a right to get angry sometimes, but if that anger is expressed violently to hurt or scare you, then it becomes domestic abuse. Learn which foods to enjoy and avoidand start feeling great! Abuse can be actual physical contact, like hitting, slapping, pushing, or otherwise inflicting bodily harm, but it can also be threatening, belittling, or making you feel intimidated or scared. What to Do If You're Struggling With Diabetes and Anger If you have diabetes and anger is a problem for you, whether it's because you're angry that you have the condition or because you have frequent blood sugar fl Continue reading >>

Do Blood Sugar Levels Affect Mood Swings?

Do Blood Sugar Levels Affect Mood Swings?

Blood sugar levels that become too high or too low can cause a variety of health problems and can even be life-threatening. Mild, moderate and severe blood sugar fluctuations can also affect your mood and behavior. If your blood sugar levels tend to spike and drop and you notice changes, you need to speak with your physician to learn how to keep your blood sugar levels in check. Video of the Day After a meal, the food you eat is broken down into glucose and either used right away for energy or stored for use later on. Glucose is also made by the liver and pancreas. In order for the cells to use glucose, the hormone insulin must be present. If you have diabetes your body either does not produce insulin or cannot use it properly. Without enough insulin your blood sugar levels can get too high. Non-diabetics can also experience fluctuations in blood sugar levels when skipping meals as a side effect of medications or from various other illnesses. Blood sugar levels are considered high if they climb to greater than 100mg/dL, and diabetes is diagnosed when the level reaches 126 mg/dL or more, according to MedlinePlus. A blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL is considered low. Both high and low blood glucose levels can cause a variety of symptoms, including mood swings. Your brain, like all areas of the body, relies on a steady supply of glucose to function properly. If you take too much insulin, skip meals, take certain medications, are extremely physically active or drink too much alcohol, your blood sugar levels can drop too low. A low blood sugar level is called hypoglycemia. Mild cases of low blood sugar can cause you to feel nervous or anxious, while more severe cases can lead to feeling irritable or tired, notes the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. Along with moo Continue reading >>

Mood Swings In Men | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Mood Swings In Men | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've developed a strong preference for the quiet life since I was diagnosed at the start of the year. I'm nearly 50 so a diagnosis of 'juvenile' diabetes was a bit of a surprise. I think I took it fairly well, all the more since I don't have any family around or a great network of friends. I've a couple of good friends but I was happy to all of the others the heave-ho. But I see there are concerns about the effect of diabetes on mental health. One of those concerns is to do with isolation and withdrawel. But I consider solitude my default setting, so am I reacting badly to the diagnosis or am I just reverting to type? I asked for a psychological assessment and the result was I request for me to refresh my certification as a psychotherapist. But I am worried about intensified emotions. Mood swings in middle-aged men are often mentioned by diabetic men but while the association is there, there is no firm evidence that diabetes causes those mood swings. However, I guess that other guys have been wrestling with the problem - whatever the cause, be it 'male menopause' or a reaction to having diabetes. I find that I get irritable with people I don't know and sometimes even quite angry. This HAS been a problem and it can often take some time to cool down. The problem is greatest at job interviews. The last two were nightmares. On both occasions, I had to hurry. The first time was due to circumstances beyond my control, the second down to sloppy planning on my part. Anyway, the result was the same. I had hurried, skipped food, talked myself into a pessimism spiral and arrived hypoglycmic - slightly light-headed, slightly shaky and definitely cranky. Any of th Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Mood Swings?

Can Diabetes Cause Mood Swings?

Diabetes is a serious and even life threatening disease if not treated appropriately. It is a disease involving the pancreas which is responsible for regulating blood sugar in the body. The pancreas regulates blood sugar in the body by releasing two different hormones: insulin and glucagon. Insulin is released when the blood sugar is high (hyperglycemia) and glucagon is released when the blood sugar is low (hypoglycemia). Diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot regulate insulin either due to the inability to make insulin because of an autoimmune destruction of the islet cells (Type 1 diabetes), or due to insulin resistance over time (Type 2 diabetes). Diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires very close monitoring of blood sugar levels and appropriate treatment with either insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. Diet is also a key treatment element in diabetes. When blood sugar is too low There has been a hypothetical link between diabetes and temperament issues in young men. Mood changes in individuals are often affected by hormonal imbalances. In the case of diabetes, the hormonal imbalance has to do with insulin and blood sugar. Hypoglycemia often results in irritability and hostility — hence the term “hangry” — referring to an angry state of mind when a person is hungry. Because hunger is often triggered by low blood sugar, a hungry person will often become angry. Although many people with diabetes do complain of rapid changes in mood and even depression, no evidence links diabetes and temperament changes in young men. Any link is most likely the result of rapidly changing blood sugar levels. Additionally, diabetes is costly and time consuming. Insulin shots, glucometers and test strips are expensive, and having to prick yourself or give yourself a shot m Continue reading >>

Emotions & Blood-sugar Levels: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Mood

Emotions & Blood-sugar Levels: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Mood

All July, the Joslin Blog is highlighting stories about taking care of yourself emotionally. This story was originally posted on Feb. 18, 2011. This guest post is written by by John Zrebiec, L.I.C.S.W., Director of Behavioral Health at Joslin, and Gail Musen, Ph.D., Investigator in the Section on Clinical, Behavioral & Outcomes Research. Diabetes can affect both your physical and mental health. A diagnosis of diabetes certainly adds a huge emotional weight, which can often manifest as depression, anxiety or some other emotional issue. The same goes for the stress of managing diabetes 24/7. Recently, Joslin researchers discovered a link between high levels of glutamate (a neurotransmitter in the brain that is produced by glucose) to symptoms of depression in people with type 1 diabetes. The study showed increased levels of glutamate in the prefrontal area of the brains of such people — an area associated with both higher-level thinking and regulation of emotions. At the same time, the study showed a link between high levels of glutamate and poor glucose control, , and lower scores on some cognitive tests. We believe that if health care practitioners emphasize good glucose control, it may help reduce the probability that patients with diabetes will also become depressed. Clinical depression is more than the normal response of feeling down for a couple of hours or days. It is more dramatic — taking you down further and longer. A psychologist would diagnose clinical depression if a patient has five or more of these symptoms for at least two weeks. At least one of these symptoms has to be depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure. Depressed mood (feeling sad or empty) most of the day, nearly every day Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, a Continue reading >>

Helping A Loved One With Diabetes

Helping A Loved One With Diabetes

Diabetes can be a demanding disease to manage. People who have the condition must constantly watch what they eat, check their blood sugar levels regularly, and take medication to keep those levels steady. If you’re close to someone who has diabetes, there are ways you can help. Learn about the disease. There are lots of myths and wrong ideas about diabetes. For example, it’s not true that a major sweet tooth can lead to the condition, or that it’s unsafe for people who have it to exercise. Learn how diabetes works, how to prevent emergencies or complications, and other information so you can be useful. Maybe ask your loved one if you can tag along to a doctor’s appointment. Make it a team effort. A diabetes diagnosis is a chance for the whole household to start some healthy habits. Get everyone to get onboard with nutritious meals, quitting smoking, and staying active. Know when to step back. Remember that the person who has diabetes is responsible for managing it, not you. Don’t second-guess the care plan or try to police meals or snacks. Living with diabetes is hard work, and encouragement and support are better than unwanted advice or, worse, scolding. Help ease stress. Too much stress can raise blood sugar levels and make it harder to control diabetes. But managing the condition can be stressful. Encourage your loved one to talk about feelings and frustrations. Try things together like meditating, walking, gardening, or watching a funny movie. Expect mood swings. Swings in blood sugar can make someone jittery, confused, anxious, or irritable. Better blood sugar control can help avoid these ups and downs. Offer emotional support, and encourage your loved one to join a support group or talk about professional counseling if you think that might help. Talk ope Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

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