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Type 2 Diabetes And Menstruation

Metabolic Syndrome Linked To Menstrual, Hormonal, Insulin Irregularities In Adolescence

Metabolic Syndrome Linked To Menstrual, Hormonal, Insulin Irregularities In Adolescence

Oligomenorrhea, polycystic ovary syndrome, sex hormones and insulin levels during adolescence may play a significant role in the genesis of metabolic syndrome and severe obesity in young adulthood, researchers report in a new study. The prospective study of 237 white and 256 black schoolgirls compared information on menstrual cycles, insulin, sex hormone levels and metabolic syndrome gathered at age 14 years with the presence of class III obesity and metabolic syndrome at age 24 years. The researchers categorized participants as having regular menstrual cycles, oligomenorrhea or PCOS. Oligomenorrhea was defined as menstrual cycles of at least 42 days and PCOS was defined as oligomenorrhea combined with biochemical hyperandrogenism. Insulin was measured between ages 10 and 16 years. Results revealed significant associations between metabolic syndrome at age 24 years and high childhood insulin levels, metabolic syndrome, PCOS and low sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) at age 14 years. A categorical model based on reports of oligomenorrhea collected from ages 14 to 19 years also identified race-specific top decile childhood insulin, race-specific bottom decile SHBG, PCOS and metabolic syndrome at age 14 years as predictors for metabolic syndrome at 24 years. Severe obesity at age 24 years was also linked with black race, low SHBG and oligomenorrhea at age 14 years. The researchers noted no significant association between obesity and childhood insulin or metabolic syndrome at age 14 years, however. Black race, race-specific top decile childhood insulin, race-specific bottom decile SHBG, metabolic syndrome and PCOS at age 14 were implicated as predictors for class III obesity at 24 years. These factors may represent a critical, reversible pathway for the development of met Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

Periods (menstruation) And Diabetes

Periods (menstruation) And Diabetes

Tweet Different stages of the menstrual cycle may have different effects on your blood glucose levels and the effect can also vary from person to person and from month to month. Recording your blood glucose results can be helpful in finding patterns in your levels and helping you to better control your diabetes. How will my period affect my sugar levels? There is not a definite answer to this as periods affect each one of us differently. However, many women report having higher blood sugar levels a few days prior to their period starting. During your period, you may experience high blood sugar levels but some women notice a sharp drop in sugar levels so it’s best to be prepared for unexpected changes to happen. Why does blood sugar rise before or during periods? Before and during your period, changes in the level of the hormones oestrogen and progesterone can induce temporary resistance to insulin which can last for up to a few days and then drop off. Some girls and women have consistent effects as to how their period affects blood sugar whereas other women may find that the effect on blood sugar varies from one month to another. Coping with periods The effect on blood sugar as a result of periods can change from one month to another so keeping a diary of your blood glucose numbers can help you to see if there are any patterns in your results across different months. If you are finding your blood glucose levels go very high before or during your period, you may need to either inject more insulin (if insulin dependent) or reduce your carbohydrate intake. If you increase your insulin, be careful to avoid hypoglycemia as your insulin sensitivity can sometimes return quickly. Speak to your health team if you need advice on how to manage your insulin doses or carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Research Reveals A Surprising Link Between Melatonin And Type 2 Diabetes

Research Reveals A Surprising Link Between Melatonin And Type 2 Diabetes

We typically associate the hormone melatonin with sleep. However, melatonin is actually involved in the timing and synchronization of a number of different physiological functions throughout the body. One of these functions is the regulation of blood sugar. Recent research has found that a relatively large proportion of the human population is genetically predisposed to be more sensitive to the impact of this hormone on blood sugar control. This can lead to higher blood glucose levels and ultimately greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Here’s how it works, and what you can do about it. The sleep hormone and the pancreas Melatonin is produced by the pineal gland in the brain in response to darkness. Levels are typically very low during the day and reach their peak at night. Like other hormones, melatonin works by binding to compatible receptors – kind of like a lock and key. These receptors are found abundantly in the eyes and the brain, and when melatonin binds to them, they signal that it’s dark outside. For humans, this darkness signal indicates that it is the period when we rest, so this timing signal contributes to and is a part of a cascade of other responses that help initiate and maintain sleep . Strangely enough, we now know that these receptors are also found in the pancreas – specifically in pancreatic beta cells. By releasing insulin, beta cells regulate glucose levels in the blood. We have also discovered that when melatonin activates these receptors, insulin secretion is decreased. Circadian physiology and glucose metabolism Prior research in animals has suggested that there is a relationship between melatonin and glucose metabolism. Mice with mutations that eliminate their melatonin receptors exhibit higher insulin secretion from their islet Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance | The Centre For Menstrual Cycle And Ovulation Research

Insulin Resistance | The Centre For Menstrual Cycle And Ovulation Research

The Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research divided by height which should be no greater than half (0.5%). Have a question about your cycles? Submit a question , and we'll do our best to get you an answer! Estrogens Storm Season: Stories of Perimenopause Estrogens Storm Season is now available in BOTH print and eBook (Mobi and ePUB) versions! It is full of lively, realistic stories with which women can relate and evidence-based, empowering perimenopause information.It was a finalist in 2006 for the Independent Publisher Book Award in Health. Purchase your ebook copy via our Amazon Kindle or Volunteer research participants are the heart of all CeMCOR research. Participants are invited to provide feedback on study processes, to learn their own results and at the end of a study, be the first to hear what the whole study found. Please become a CeMCOR research participantyou can contribute to improving the scientific information available for daughters, friends and the wider world of women. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Headache

Diabetes Headache

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that causes high blood glucose levels and a host of secondary symptoms, some of which can be dangerous. A less serious side effect of having type 1 or type 2 diabetes is having a headache. You can have a headache in diabetes any time that your blood sugar levels are too high or too low. While headaches in diabetes aren’t inherently dangerous, they can become a signal to you that the blood sugar values are out of control. If you are experiencing a headache and also have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you should check your blood sugar right away and take measures to bring your blood sugar under good control. Headache Information Headaches are extremely common and can be seen in both adults and children. Headaches are perhaps the most common type of pain a person can have. They are a major cause of work loss as well as missed days from school. There are many causes of headaches, including out of control diabetes and low blood sugar. Headaches can be primary or secondary headaches. Primary headaches have no underlying cause but occur when the nerve cells of the brain, the muscles around the scalp, or the blood vessels in the brain send pain signals to the part of the brain that registers pain. Common primary headaches include tension headaches and migraine headaches, which may or may not be related to having diabetes. Secondary headaches are those headaches that have some kind of underlying cause. One cause of secondary headaches is diabetes. Other things that can trigger secondary headaches include the following: Brain abnormalities such as an aneurysm or brain tumor Problems with the eyes and vision Hormonal changes, such as those seen in women from their menstrual cycle Stress or anxiety Hemorrhagic stroke Hypertension (high blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Menstrual Cycle

Diabetes And The Menstrual Cycle

Diabetes is a lifelong disease that involves a disruption of the hormone insulin, which the body (through the pancreas) produces to allow your body to store and use the sugar and fat you eat. Diabetes occurs when either the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, produces very little insulin, or when the body poses a resistance to insulin. What is diabetes? There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, known as juvenile diabetes, often develops in younger people. In type 1 diabetes, the body can no longer produce enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes is known as adult-onset diabetes, which can develop in people at any age, but most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 diabetes typically begins with insulin resistance. Over time, the body will be unable to produce enough insulin to keep up with the added demand. How does it affect the menstrual cycle? Diabetes is a serious condition that affects many women, and can have an effect on a woman’s reproductive health as well. The hormones that regulate the menstrual cycle can cause fluctuations in the blood glucose levels of the body. These menstrual hormones have an effect on insulin sensitivity. These hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can disrupt the insulin hormone and cause the body to become more resistant to insulin during this time. Therefore, if you have diabetes, during or around the time of your menstrual cycle, your blood glucose levels might rise for three to five days. Increasing progesterone levels can also cause more food cravings, which can make managing your diabetes and food intake more difficult. These changes usually vary from person to person and month to month, so it may be difficult to monitor the effects. For women with diabetes, rising blood glucose levels during the time Continue reading >>

Lois Jovanovic, Md

Lois Jovanovic, Md

Diabetes and Pregnancy, Trying to Concieve, Parenting, Women's Issues. Join Diabetic Mommy! Click Here Free Updates HOME Main Forum BD Links: Plan for Pregnancy Pregnancy Issues Complications Shape up after birth Blood sugar targets Hypoglycemia Hyperglycemia Your diabetes kit Lois Jovanovic, M.D., answers questions about pregnancy and diabetes BD answers questions about insulin injections during pregnancy This page is sponsored by BD Diabetes Educators recommend BD syringes to their patients more than any other brand because of the fine, thin BD needles 1. For women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, how do insulin needs change during menstruation? Insulin and Menstruation with Diabetes: Pre-menstrual hormones tend to make a woman's blood glucose higher at breakfast than it normally would be. Pre-menstrual hormones also make a woman's typical blood glucose fluctuations during the day even greater than usual. The only way to manage changing insulin requirements right before your period is to measure your blood glucose often. Your doctor can help you to figure out what insulin dose adjustments you should make each month before your period. Usually, a woman's insulin requirement goes up 10 to 15% during the last 3 to 5 days of the menstrual cycle due to the hormone progesterone. This is the hormone that prepares the uterus to be full of extra tissue and blood to receive the egg, if it is fertilized. Rising levels of progesterone counteract that action of insulin. During these days, bedtime insulin doses may need to be increased, and possibly morning insulin doses as well. 2. For women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, how do insulin requirements change during pregnancy? Insulin and Pregnancy: Pregnancy, type I diabetes, and insulin If you have type 1 diabetes, your insulin re Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Gum Disease Menstruation Mellitus

Diabetes Type 2 Gum Disease Menstruation Mellitus

Diabetes Type 2 Gum Disease Menstruation Mellitus These goals may be adjusted for patients in whom strict glucose control with oral antihyperglycemic drugs maintain acceptable glucose levels when fasting and may not require insulin in the perioperative period. Low-carbohydrate diets such as the Atkins diet limit the amount of carbohydrates you can eat to exert insulin control. Diabetes Type 2 Gum Disease Menstruation Mellitus we already know that Bydureon has a significant side effect. What is a Very Low-Calorie Diet (VLCD)? Who Should Use a VLCD? Health Benefits Associated with a VLCD. treated with gemcitabine IL-13-PE or. Diabetes Diet: New Book The End Of Diabetes Highlights Ways To Prevent And Reverse The Low fat vegetarian diets focus on grains as a major calorie Gestacional Diabetes Inspida. Sanuwave: DermaPACE Could Be Very Competitive In $2B Diabetic Foot Ulcer Market. The EXPO is free and includes health screenings cooking demonstrations information and Diabetes Mody Diabetes mellitus happens to be a widespread disease today but even then very little at times the right information on it. Diabetic foot ulcers trust in faith healers and undetected diabetes. Diabetes Supplements Treatment 2 diabetes quizlet. If you have kids this would be a lot of fun to Diabetes is a chronic condition caused by the bodys inability to produce or make use of insulin. What do you all eat for eakfast as I non diabetic when it comes to cereal I would eat either porridge or anflakes sometimes with the sultanas. Adam Brown: Diabetes on a 65% Fat Diet. Women do not eat eakfast woman ate eakfast Great hazardsRead(8). Gestational Diabetes: Etiology Epidemiology Diagnosis Maternal and Fetal Ramifications Join MD Andersons team at the annual Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Purplestride Hou Continue reading >>

Here Are Some Recommendations For Building Your Prediabetes Plan.

Here Are Some Recommendations For Building Your Prediabetes Plan.

Learning you have prediabetes can be frightening. But if you make a few basic diet and exercise changes, you can get your blood sugar levels back down to normal and prevent the progression to type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not high enough to qualify as type 2 diabetes. To be diagnosed with prediabetes, you must have: A fasting blood glucose—a measure of how much sugar (or glucose) is in your blood after a period of fasting—of 100 to125 mg/dL A two-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) blood glucose of 140 to 199 mg/dL; this test gauges how your body breaks down sugar while drinking a sugar-based beverage over a two-hour period. Hemoglobin A1C of 5.7 to 6.4 percent; this is a measure of your average blood sugar level over three months. Twenty-five percent of people with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within three to five years, and that percentage continues to rise with time. But making a few simple tweaks to your diet, getting regular physical activity and achieving and maintaining a healthy weight (which the first two should help with) can not only prevent the progression of prediabetes to type 2 diabetes, it can also drop elevated blood sugar levels back to normal. In fact, the American Diabetes Association estimates that you can cut your risk for type 2 diabetes by nearly 60 percent by simply incorporating 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week and by losing 7 percent of your body weight (that’s only 14 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds). Fight prediabetes with a two-pronged approach: Exercise There are two main forms of exercise, and both help with prediabetes. Make sure to incorporate aerobic exercises, such as brisk walking, swimming, water aerobics, and even seasonal ac Continue reading >>

Improve Diabetes Management By Understanding Your Menstrual Cycle With This Guide

Improve Diabetes Management By Understanding Your Menstrual Cycle With This Guide

Improve Diabetes Management by Understanding Your Menstrual Cycle With This Guide Living with diabetes means accounting for the never-ending list of factors that can drive blood sugar levels up or down. For women with diabetes, one of these factors repeats itself each monthour menstrual cycle. One of the key factors in diabetes management is our mood. If we are feeling blue orjust plain out of it, this is going to affect our diabetes management. If you know what to expect however, you canbe better prepared to deal with the changes. So here is a week by week detailing of what your body and hormones are doing each month: A womans menstrual cycle begins on the first day of her period each month. On this day, estrogen and testosteroneare verylowwhile the blood and tissue that lines the uterus starts to shed and will do so for the next few days. The low levels of hormones make for a generally rough day, though estrogen is making its comeback and this tends to take the edge off of ones mood. Estrogen and testosterone keep slowly rising each day after you start, giving you back a sense of normalcy. If you were having a hard time sticking to your healthy diet and exercise routine last week, now is the time to take a walk and gently get back into the swing of things. You will notice that your blood sugars are easier to manage and that giving an injection or changing your pump or CGM site will start feeling less painful. You may have needed more insulin a few days ago but now you can typically start heading back to the insulin-to-carb ratio you typically use. If your mood is a big challenge during PMS week, then remember that once you start your period, estrogen starts to rise within a few hours and relief is on its way! By day four you are likely to feel like yourself again. Es Continue reading >>

Fertility Issues In Women With Diabetes

Fertility Issues In Women With Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus Type 1 and Type 2 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of menstrual abnormalities and infertility. The reproductive period of diabetic women may be reduced due to delayed menarche and premature menopause. During the reproductive years, diabetes has been associated with menstrual abnormalities, such as oligomenorrhea and secondary amenorrhea. It was found that better glycemic control and prevention of diabetic complications improves these irregularities and increases fertility rates close to those that are seen in the general population. Women with persistent menstrual abnormalities despite adequate treatment need to be approached by broader evaluation, which will include the examination of the hypothalamicpituitaryovarian axis and the hormonal status, presence of autoimmune thyroid disease and antiovarian autoantibodies, and hyperandrogenism. Diabetes is a disease that affects millions of people and their families. The WHO estimates that more than 180 million people worldwide have diabetes. This number is likely to more than double by 2030.[ 1 ] Type 1 diabetes, which predominately affects youth, is rising alarmingly worldwide, at a rate of 3% per year. Some 70,000 children aged 14 and under develop Type 1 diabetes annually. Type 2 diabetes is also increasing in number among children and adolescents as obesity rates in this population continue to soar, in both developed and developing nations.[ 101 ] Diabetes affects women in many ways, and one of them will be the focus of the present review the association between diabetes mellitus and infertility ( Box 1 ). Table 1. Standardized fertility ratios among women hospitalized for Type 1 diabetes at 16 years of age, stratified by type of complications (19652004, Sweden). SFR for Type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Girls With Early First Periods Become Women With Greater Risk Of Gestational Diabetes

Girls With Early First Periods Become Women With Greater Risk Of Gestational Diabetes

Girls with early first periods become women with greater risk of gestational diabetes In Western societies, average age of first period has dropped from 17 to 13 years over the past century. justanotherhuman/flickr , CC BY-NC-SA Girls with early first periods become women with greater risk of gestational diabetes Professor of Life Course Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. As a young girl, getting your period for the first time is a big deal. It comes with mental and social expectations around becoming a woman and a host of cultural practices that act to celebrate or stigmatise menstruation. But evidence now suggests the timing of this event could also have health implications for girls who get their first period earlier than their peers. During puberty our bodies change and sexually mature, and a girls first period is an important point in this process. The age when girls get their first period varies, however younger than 12 years is generally considered to be early. The possibility that a first period before the age of 12 is linked with pregnancy health was explored in our recent study . We found that girls who had early first periods were more likely to develop diabetes when they later became pregnant as an adult. Gestational diabetes is a serious pregnancy complication , as it increases the risk of pre-term labour and giving birth to a large baby. It is also considered a stress test for the later development of type 2 diabetes; both the mother and child in affected pregnancies face a six to seven fold increased risk of Continue reading >>

Menstrual Cycle Irregularity And Metabolic Disorders: A Population-based Prospective Study

Menstrual Cycle Irregularity And Metabolic Disorders: A Population-based Prospective Study

Menstrual Cycle Irregularity and Metabolic Disorders: A Population-Based Prospective Study Affiliation Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Affiliation Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Affiliation Non_communicable Diseases Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Development of Research Technology Center, Deputy of Research and Technology, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran Affiliation Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Affiliation Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Affiliation Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Menstrual Cycle Irregularity and Metabolic Disorders: A Population-Based Prospective Study The regularity of menstrual cycles is considered an indicator of womens reproductive health. Previous studies with a cross-sectional design have documented the relationship between menstrual cycle irregularities, insulin-resistance and the future risks for metabolic disorders. Limited data documented by prospective studies can lead to premature conclusions regarding the relationship between menstrual cycle irregularities and other conditions influencing womens health. The present study therefore, using a prospective design aimed to asse Continue reading >>

Womens Monthly Cycle Affects Blood Glucose Control, But Not Consistently

Womens Monthly Cycle Affects Blood Glucose Control, But Not Consistently

Womens Monthly Cycle Affects Blood Glucose Control, But Not Consistently Only a handful of studies have examined the relationship of a womans menstrual cycle to her blood glucose control, but they have one finding in common: menstruations effect on blood glucose is as varied as each individuals disease. As a result, blood glucose testing remains the only way to know how a womans monthly cycle affects her diabetes control. Kimberly Trout, an assistant professor at Villanova Universitys College of Nursing who led one of the more recent studies, said that her study and others reveal decreased insulin sensitivity during menstruation as the most common issue. According to various studies and published reports, including Trouts, this decreased insulin sensitivity could be related to fluctuations in hormone levels during the different phases of the menstrual cycle, as well as inflammation and premenstrual symptoms such as mood swings. But studies and anecdotal evidence also show opposite effects for some women, and no effect for others. In Trouts study, published in 2007, three out of five women experienced this phenomenon, but the research didnt pinpoint its etiology. And for one person in the study, insulin sensitivity improved. Progesterone is thought to be the main culprit in decreased insulin sensitivity during the luteal, or post-ovulation, phase, Trout said in an interview. Its not completely understood. I also know so many women whose blood sugar levels drop. Because there are such individual and varied results in studies, everyone needs to really monitor themselves. In some cases, fluctuations can cause DKA, according to a Review of Endocrinology article published last September. But the same article notes that extreme cases are not common and that even mild fluctuat Continue reading >>

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