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Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease

Eating Fried Foods Tied To Increased Risk Of Diabetes, Heart Disease

Eating Fried Foods Tied To Increased Risk Of Diabetes, Heart Disease

People who eat a lot of fried foods may have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to a large, long-term study. Led by Leah Cahill, research fellow in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), and An Pan of the National University of Singapore’s Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, the researchers examined data from more than 100,000 men and women over about 25 years. They found that people who ate fried food at least once per week had a greater risk of both type 2 diabetes and heart disease, and that the risk increased as the frequency of fried food consumption increased. For instance, participants who ate fried foods 4-6 times per week had a 39% increased risk of type 2 diabetes, and those who ate fried foods 7 or more times per week had a 55% increased risk, compared with those who ate fried foods less than once per week. Eating fried foods away from home—where frying oil may not be fresh—posed the greatest risk, Cahill said. With each reuse, oil becomes more degraded, and more gets absorbed into food, which can contribute to weight gain, higher cholesterol, and higher blood pressure—all risk factors for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Trans fat-free cooking oils—increasingly used by restaurants—may pose less risk, Cahill said, although she noted in a June 20, 2014 Time.com article that she cannot give specific recommendations on the safest oils to cook with. “Our study is really a first take, and we need to know more before we can say what’s safe,” she said. She added in an interview, “Because there is not enough research to date to clearly confirm that one type of oil is best to use for frying, it is probably wisest to alternate a variety of oils to provide you with a mix of fatty acids Continue reading >>

Diabetes Increases Heart Attack Risk By 48%

Diabetes Increases Heart Attack Risk By 48%

"People with diabetes 48% more likely to suffer heart attack, researchers find," says The Guardian. Meanwhile, the Daily Mail reports that people with diabetes are "65% more likely to have heart failure than the rest of the population". Both stories are based on the most recent report of the National Diabetes Audit, which presents data from England and Wales on the complications that arise due to diabetes. Diabetes makes it difficult for the body to control blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels and lead to range of complications, such as: angina – chest pain that results from a temporary restriction of blood supply to the heart retinopathy – where the retina (the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of the eye) is damaged foot ulcers, which in the most serious cases, require a section of the foot or lower leg to be amputated People with type 1 diabetes can also experience a dangerous complication called diabetic ketoacidosis where the body breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. Left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis can be fatal. The National Diabetes Audit report highlights these complications, as well as deaths in people with diabetes. The audit confirms and quantifies these risks, and provides recommendations on how the NHS can benefit from addressing the complications of diabetes, and how this can improve the lives of people with diabetes. Who produced the report? The National Diabetes Audit is produced by the NHS Information Centre each year. It looks at diabetes care and outcomes throughout England and Wales. The portion of the report covered in the media specifically focuses on complications and deaths related to diabetes. The current report covers the eighth year of the audit, and is based on data from 2010-11. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Having diabetes means that you are more likely to develop heart disease and have a greater chance of a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain conditions, or risk factors, that increase the chances of having heart disease or stroke, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. If you have diabetes, you can protect your heart and health by managing your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you smoke, get help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease.1 People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke as people without diabetes.2 The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help to lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke. What else increases my chances of heart disease or stroke if I have diabetes? If you have diabetes, other factors add to your chances of developing heart disease or having a stroke. Smoking Smoking raises your risk of developing heart disease. If you have diabetes, it is important to stop smoking because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels. Smoking also increases your chances of developing other long-term problems such as lung disease. Smoking also can damage the blood vessels in your legs and increase the risk of lower leg infections, ulcers, a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular (cv) Disease Go Hand In Hand.

Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular (cv) Disease Go Hand In Hand.

JARDIANCE is a prescription medicine used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes, and also to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adults with type 2 diabetes who have known cardiovascular disease. JARDIANCE is not for people with type 1 diabetes or for people with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). Dehydration. JARDIANCE can cause some people to have dehydration (the loss of body water and salt). Dehydration may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, light-headed, or weak, especially when you stand up. You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you: have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics), are on a low salt diet, have kidney problems, are 65 years of age or older. Ketoacidosis (increased ketones in your blood or urine). Ketoacidosis is a serious condition and may need to be treated in the hospital. Ketoacidosis may lead to death. Ketoacidosis occurs in people with type 1 diabetes and can also occur in people with type 2 diabetes taking JARDIANCE, even if blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL. Stop taking JARDIANCE and call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, and if possible, check for ketones in your urine: nausea, vomiting, stomach-area (abdominal) pain, tiredness, or trouble breathing. Serious urinary tract infections. Serious urinary tract infections can occur in people taking JARDIANCE and may lead to hospitalization. Tell your doctor if you have symptoms of a urinary tract infection such as a burning feeling when passing urine, a need to urinate often or right away, pain in the lower part of your stomach or pelvis, or blood in the urine. Sometimes people also may have a fever, back pain, nausea or vomit Continue reading >>

The Numbers For Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes

The Numbers For Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a treatable condition, but even when blood glucose levels are managed properly, there’s a heightened possibility of stroke or heart disease. “We say that patients with diabetes are more likely to have cardiovascular disease, but I think it’s important to understand how much more likely,” said Tas Saliaris, M.D., in an interview with HealthCentral. In this slideshow, we’ll explore some specific numbers associated with heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The American Heart Association (AHA) considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). You can modify or control seven major independent risk factors for coronary heart disease: Cigarette and tobacco smoke, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, physical inactivity, overweight or obesity, diabetes, and healthy diet. If you have type 2 diabetes, you could be asked to make four changes, including eating a heart-healthy diet, exercising regularly, avoiding tobacco smoke, and losing weight if you’re overweight or obese. Get active. Just 40 minutes of aerobic exercise of moderate to vigorous intensity done three to four times a week is enough to lower both cholesterol and high blood pressure. Brisk walking, swimming, bicycling, or dancing classes are examples. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are overweight and older than 45. It also recommends testing for those over 45 who have one of more additional risk factors such as: high blood pressure; high cholesterol; a family history of diabetes; African-American, Asian-American, Latino/Hispanic-American, Native American, or Pacific Islander descent; or a history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or delivering a b Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: One Treatment For Both Could Be On Horizon

Heart Disease And Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: One Treatment For Both Could Be On Horizon

Scientists have discovered the conditions are linked by the same genes which could offer hope of combating them with the same drug. Researchers analysed the complete DNA of more than 250,000 people and found seven mutations that increased the risk for heart disease and diabetes. It could help explain why diabetics are 65 and 48 per cent more likely to suffer heart failure or a heart attack, respectively. "Identifying these gene variants linked to both type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease risk in principle opens up opportunities to lower the risk of both outcomes with a single drug,” said Professor Danish Saleheen, Epidemiologist at Pennsylvania University. The findings add to the basic scientific understanding of both major illnesses and point to potential targets for future drugs. Professor Saleheen said: "From a drug development perspective it would make sense to focus on those pathways that are most strongly linked to both diseases." Type 2 diabetes is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) but the reasons why are still fairly unclear. Coronary heart disease affects more than 2.3 million people in Britain and 69,000 die from heart attacks every year as a result. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. There are an estimated 3.6 million Britons living with type 2 diabetes - a major cause of premature death. Professor Saleheen’s team analysed DNA data from participants of South Asian, East Asian or European descent, uncovered 16 new genetic variants associated with diabetes and one with heart disease. They then showed most known to increase the risk of one also increased the ri Continue reading >>

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering: Nearly two-thirds of people with diabetes have high blood pressure, and, according to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke than people who don't have the condition. The good news: Learning more about the link between heart disease and diabetes can help you take steps to help protect your heart and manage your diabetes. How Diabetes and Heart Disease Are Related The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. Over time, the high glucose in the bloodstream can damage the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels, a condition known as atherosclerosis. This can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Other heart facts to consider: People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. Heart disease that leads to heart attack or stroke is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes. A person who has diabetes has the same risk of heart attack as someone who is not diabetic, but already had a heart attack. Protecting Your Heart When You Have Diabetes If you believe you are at a higher risk for heart disease, don’t despair. There are several small lifestyle changes you can make to not only help prevent heart disease, but also manage your diabetes more effectively. Be active. The American Heart Association recomme Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular Risk

Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular Risk

You may not be aware that, if you have type 2 diabetes, you are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease than people without diabetes. Cardiovascular disease refers to all of the diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels. Due to this increased risk, people with diabetes are 2–6 times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease compared to people without type 2 diabetes. Get to the heart of T2D is a Novo Nordisk global initiative that focuses on raising awareness of this risk and providing tips to people with type 2 diabetes to help improve outcomes. If you have type 2 diabetes, it is important to take care of your heart health and type 2 diabetes, together. One of the first steps is learning more about type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk and how the two are related so that you can take any necessary steps to best manage both. This includes talking to your doctor about the current state of your type 2 diabetes to assess your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. If your type 2 diabetes is well controlled, then your risk for developing cardiovascular disease is reduced. Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong disease. Taking care of both your diabetes and cardiovascular health in the long-term involves eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly and monitoring your blood glucose levels. Learn more about cardiovascular disease and what you can do to lower your risk if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Heart Disease

Diabetic Heart Disease

is heart disease that develops in people with diabetes. Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can cause a heart attack, which is sometimes "silent," or a stroke. People who have diabetes are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease because, over time, high blood sugar can damage blood vessels and nerves that control the heart. Heart attack A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart is blocked Symptoms of a heart attack include: Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching feeling in your chest or arms Nausea, indigestion, heartburn, or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Silent heart attack A silent heart attack is one that has few or no symptoms Stroke A stroke occurs when part of your brain goes without blood for too long Symptoms of a stroke include: Sudden weakness or droopiness of the face, or issues with your vision Sudden weakness or numbness in one or both arms Difficulty speaking, slurred speech, or garbled speech If you experience symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, be sure to seek immediate medical attention. Continue reading >>

What Does Diabetes Do To Your Heart Disease Risk?

What Does Diabetes Do To Your Heart Disease Risk?

Many people with diabetes also have heart disease. When you do things to take care of your diabetes, like manage your blood sugar, exercise, and eat a healthy diet, that's also good for your heart. It's important to understand your risk and how you can lower it. Besides diabetes, do you also have: A waist that's larger than 35 inches in women or 40 inches in men? Low levels of "good" ( HDL) cholesterol? High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol or triglycerides (another type of fat in the blood)? Even borderline elevated at 130/85 If you're not sure, your doctor can check all those numbers for you. Also, do you: Smoke? Have a family member with heart disease? Your doctor needs that information to work with you on a plan for better heart health. People with diabetes are at risk for: Coronary artery disease. Your coronary arteries are in your heart. Fatty deposits, called plaques, can narrow them. If plaque suddenly breaks, it can cause a heart attack. Exercise, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking are musts. It could be from coronary artery disease or from the diabetes. It can be dangerous and fatal, so aggressive management and follow up is essential Congestive heart failure. This is an ongoing condition in which the heart loses the ability to pump blood effectively. The main symptoms are shortness of breath when you're moving and leg swelling. Many people have both conditions. If you smoke, it's time to quit. Set a date and talk to your doctor. If you've tried to quit before, it's not too late. Many people try several times before they kick the habit for good. Nearly everyone with diabetes can benefit from getting more exercise. It's good for your heart and helps control your blood sugar. Even brisk walking counts, so you don't need a gym. If you're not active now, let Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Om P. Ganda, M.D., Director, Lipid Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School There is a clear-cut relationship between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center many years ago showed a two- to three-fold increased incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared to people without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared to those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease, (leading to heart attack and stroke), is by far the most frequent cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations. Several advances in treating heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so does the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival after a heart attack has been less than half as much as in the general population. Not Just One Risk Factor Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease, but most likely it is not just high blood glucose levels, but a variety of mechanisms that interact. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to such other well-established risk factors as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. More than 90 percent of patients have one or more of these additional risk factors. There is evidence that smoking hastens the Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Aaron contacted TheDiabetesCouncil with some questions related to diabetes and heart disease. Aaron is 57 years old. He has had Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. Aaron visited his doctor related to swelling in his ankles and feet, shortness of breath, and weight gain. After some tests, the doctor informed him that on top of his Type 2 diabetes, he now has congestive heart failure. He was now wondering why did he have heart disease now and was it because of his diabetes? In order to help Aaron and other people with diabetes understand the connection between diabetes and heart disease and how to prevent it, we decided to look into the specific link between the two diseases. What is the connection between diabetes and heart disease? According to the American Heart Association, there exist a relationship between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: 68% percent of people with diabetes who are aged 65 and older die from heart disease and 16% die of a stroke. People with diabetes are more likely to die from a heart disease than those without diabetes. The National Institute of Health states the following for people with diabetes: They have additional causes of heart disease They are at higher risk of heart disease than those who do not have diabetes They may develop heart disease at a younger age Risk assessment must take into account the major risk factors (cigarette smoking, elevated blood pressure, abnormal serum lipids and lipoproteins, and hyperglycemia) and predisposing risk factors (excess body weight and abdominal obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of CVD). Identification of risk factors is a major first step for developing a plan for risk reduction in persons with diabetes. – Scott M. Grundy et al, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease In two words, the conn Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart disease is common in people with diabetes. Data from the National Heart Association from 2012 shows 65% of people with diabetes will die from some sort of heart disease or stroke. In general, the risk of heart disease death and stroke are twice as high in people with diabetes. While all people with diabetes have an increased chance of developing heart disease, the condition is more common in those with type 2 diabetes. In fact, heart disease is the number one cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes. The Framingham Study was one of the first pieces of evidence to show that people with diabetes are more vulnerable to heart disease than those people who did not have diabetes. The Framingham Study looked at generations of people, including those with diabetes, to try to determine the health risk factors for developing heart disease. It showed that multiple health factors -- including diabetes -- could increase the possibility of developing heart disease. Aside from diabetes, other health problems associated with heart disease include high blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol levels, and a family history of early heart disease. The more health risks factors a person has for heart disease, the higher the chances that they will develop heart disease and even die from it. Just like anyone else, people with diabetes have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they have more health risk factors. However, the probability of dying from heart disease is 2 to 4 times higher in a person with diabetes. So, while a person with one health risk factor, such as high blood pressure, may have a certain chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has double or even quadruple the risk of dying. For example, one medical study found that people with d Continue reading >>

Silent Heart Attacks And Type 2 Diabetes

Silent Heart Attacks And Type 2 Diabetes

With commentary by Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., study senior author and director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Not all heart attacks announce themselves with Hollywood-style crushing chest pain and a drenching, cold sweat. When researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, checked the hearts and medical records of 9,498 people over nine years, they found1 nearly equal numbers of untreated, silent heart attacks and recognized heart attacks that had received medical attention. A silent heart attack may be missed because the symptoms are mild or seem like another, less-urgent health issue – such as indigestion, heartburn, the flu, fatigue or an ache-y muscle – notes Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., study senior author and director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. “People may also decide not to go to the hospital if they’re not sure it’s a heart attack, or if the hospital is far away, they don’t have health insurance or are concerned about the cost of care,” Dr. Soliman told EndocrineWeb.com. But in the study, published May 16 in the journal Circulation, that proved deadly. People who’d had silent heart attacks were three times more likely than those who hadn’t had a heart attack at all to die. Typically, people who’ve had a silent heart attack miss out on emergency care that can save heart muscle during a heart attack such as fast treatment with procedures that open blocked arteries in the heart. They may also miss out on stepped-up attention to blood pressure, cholesterol, diet, exercise and stress afterwards that lower risk Continue reading >>

Diabetes Dilemma: The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes Dilemma: The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

I like knowing why things are the way they are. Understanding the underlying causes of heart problems and treating them is one of the reasons I love working in cardiology. Sometimes the causes are obvious. Sometimes they’re not. For many people, the connection between diabetes and heart disease falls into the latter category. In fact, my wife and I talked about that just the other day over breakfast. She pointed out that people might take better care of themselves if they understood how the two conditions are connected. And I agree! The heart risks of diabetes If you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, you’re more likely to develop heart disease than someone who doesn’t have diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke than adults who don’t have diabetes. There are a few reasons for this higher risk in diabetes patients: Fluctuating levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which can damage the interior surfaces of blood vessels Potentially higher levels of lipids, or fats, in the blood, including high cholesterol levels (a condition known as diabetic dyslipidemia, which is associated with heart disease) A wide range of reactions specific to their type of diabetes, including elevated hormones and cytokines (proteins that cells use to communicate and carry out vital functions) These factors often result in accelerated atherosclerosis, or thickening of the walls of the arteries. But these aren’t the only ways patients with diabetes may be at greater risk for heart disease. Obesity, which often is a problem for patients with Type 2 diabetes, only makes these issues worse. Obese patients are more likely to have high blood pressure on top of their elevated ri Continue reading >>

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