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Type 2 Diabetes And Dizziness

Diabetes Type 2: Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Include Feeling Dizzy | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2: Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Include Feeling Dizzy | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes type 2 is caused by the pancreas not producing enough insulin, or the body not reacting to the hormone, according to the NHS . Without enough insulin, the body cant convert sugar in the blood into useable energy. If you take insulin to treat your diabetes, you could be at risk of low blood sugar - or hypocalcaemia - if you take too much of diabetes medicine. Symptoms of low blood sugar can include feeling dizzy, and is usually treated by eating a sugar snack. Diabetes type 2: This spice could prevent high blood sugar Diabetes type 2: Symptoms of low blood sugar include feeling dizzy Hypoglycaemia is a condition characterised by abnormally low bloodglucose[bloodsugar] levels, usually less than 70mg/dl, said the American Diabetes Association. However, it is important to talk to your health care provider about your individualblood glucosetargets, and what level is too low for you. Hypoglycaemic symptoms are important clues that you have low blood glucose. Each person's reaction tohypoglycaemiais different, so it's important that you learn your own signs and symptoms when your blood glucose is low. Continue reading >>

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that can cause blood sugar (glucose) to be higher than normal. Many people do not feel symptoms with type 2 diabetes. However, common symptoms do exist and being able to recognize them is important. Most symptoms of type 2 diabetes occur when blood sugar levels are abnormally high. The most common symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: If you experience any of these symptoms on a regular basis, talk to your doctor. They may recommend that you be tested for diabetes, which is performed with a basic blood draw. Routine diabetes screening normally starts at age 45. However, it might start earlier if you are: sedentary affected by high blood pressure, now or when you were pregnant from a family with a history of type 2 diabetes from an ethnic background that has a higher risk of type 2 diabetes at higher risk due to high blood pressure, low good cholesterol levels, or high triglyceride levels If you have diabetes, it can help to understand how your blood sugar levels affect the way you feel. Most common symptoms of diabetes are caused by elevated glucose levels. Frequent or Increased Urination Elevated glucose levels force fluids from your cells. This increases the amount of fluid delivered to the kidneys. This makes you need to urinate more. It may also eventually make you dehydrated. Thirst As your tissues become dehydrated, you will become thirsty. Increased thirst is another common diabetes symptom. The more you urinate, the more you need to drink, and vice versa. Fatigue Feeling worn down is another common symptom of diabetes. Glucose is normally one of the body’s main sources of energy. When cells cannot absorb sugar, you can become fatigued or feel exhausted. Blurred Vision In the short term, high glucose levels can cause a swelli Continue reading >>

Dizziness

Dizziness

Tweet Because diabetes is such a diverse disease with many complications, it can cause dizziness in many ways by affecting different parts of the body. Dizziness is an episode of unsteadiness and unbalance as a result of something affecting the brain or ears. However, dizziness can also be a symptom of many things other than diabetes. So if you are experiencing recurrent dizzy spells, you should contact your doctor who will be able to diagnose the cause. Causes of dizziness A dizzy spell can be brought on by many things, but in cases of diabetes the most common causes are: Low blood pressure Dizziness can be cause by the heart's inability to pump blood up to the brain sufficiently, especially when suddenly standing up from a sitting or a lying position. As the blood momentarily fails to reach the brain, a spinning sensation, unsteadiness or even fainting can occur. Dehydration High blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) can cause polyuria, which in turn can lead to dehydration by passing too much fluid out of the body in an attempt to remove excess glucose. With low levels of water in the body, the brain may struggle to function correctly and cause light headedness. Hypoglycemia Having a low amount of sugar in your blood (hypoglycemia) can lead to dizziness by causing the brain cells to malfunction. Certain medications Some medications, including those used to treat people with diabetes, can cause dizzy spells. The instruction leaflet that comes with a medicine will list any possible side effects of the drug. When to see your doctor If you are suffering from bouts of dizziness that are recurrent or persistent you should go and see a doctor. They will likely ask questions to gauge whether there is a pattern to the feelings of dizziness, so keeping a record of dizzy spells pr Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes And Dizziness

Understanding Diabetes And Dizziness

Identifying the Source and Treating Feelings of Dizziness If you’ve ever felt suddenly unsteady, lightheaded or faint, you’re not alone. Dizziness is one of the many symptoms that plague diabetics, and though it may not be as pressing as a hypoglycemic episode or neurological emergency, you shouldn’t ignore your dizzy spell. So, what causes dizziness? Dizzy feelings start in the brain, but the brain isn’t always to blame. In fact, dizziness can be a consequences of a variety of malfunctions, from blood pressure to oxygen levels. Learn where your dizziness may be coming from, and how you and your doctor can stop it for good. How Diabetes Can Leave You Lightheaded Your body relies on a balance of chemicals, hormones and nutrients to stay energized and to function well. Diabetes interferes with a number of natural processes (most notably, your ability to metabolize glucose), and that can throw things way off balance. Dizziness is a sign you may need to pay more attention to managing your diabetes symptoms in order to restore the harmony between all the systems in your body. In many cases, a lightheaded, dizzy or faint feeling can be traced to: Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar is one of the most common causes for dizziness among diabetics, but luckily, it’s quite treatable. The problem stems from a lack of glucose in your brain, which causes it to malfunction. Getting a burst of sugar into the bloodstream with a glucose tablet or sugary food should take care of the dizziness. When the faint feeling comes with sweating, confusion, and lack of muscle control, it’s a serious situation that demands quick and aggressive treatment. Hyperglycemia When your blood sugar climbs too high, your body tries to get rid of the excess glucose through frequent urination (polyuria), a Continue reading >>

What Are The Causes Of Dizziness In Diabetics?

What Are The Causes Of Dizziness In Diabetics?

The American Diabetes Association and other health professionals are dedicated to the research and treatment of diabetes and associated conditions. They have found that the main reason diabetics experience dizziness is because of a lack of control of blood sugar and blood pressure levels. These levels need to be balanced and maintained. Video of the Day A medical doctor prescribes a certain amount of medication to many diabetic patients, to be taken at a certain time. Type 1 diabetics require insulin to maintain a proper blood sugar level; Type 2 diabetics may have to rely on oral medication. Medication instructions must be followed precisely. Variation may cause the blood sugar levels to be too high or too low. This is especially true of the Type 1 diabetic. Also, regular doctors visits are important. Blood sugar levels are checked and adjustments made to medication, if needed. Blood sugar levels must be checked at home as well. This is mandatory to keep the levels steady. The daily diet is also discussed during these appointments. Diet is just as essential as medication in controlling blood sugar levels, and for diabetics who do not need medication, diet is the source for controlling blood sugar levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics with gastroparesis find it very difficult to control blood sugar levels. Gastroparesis is a condition in which the nerves in the stomach that aid digestion are impaired, leading to incomplete digestion, nausea, vomiting and pain. High blood pressure is common in diabetics because of shared causes of the diseases themselves, according to Dr. Patrick Lyden, professor of neuroscience and director of UC San Diego's Stroke Center. High blood pressure can cause dizziness, as can low blood pressure. Dr. Timothy Hain of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

What Causes Diabetes Dizziness?

Have You Experienced Dizziness Related to Your Diabetes? Dizziness is not a pleasant feeling. It can strike unexpectedly anytime, anywhere, leaving you unable to carry on with everyday tasks. This lightheaded sensation is typically accompanied by a sudden flush of heat and often seems to occur at the most inconvenient time possible, which can be embarrassing. As awkward as sudden dizziness can be, you should always alert someone nearby to the fact that you have diabetes. Feeling lightheaded can be the first warning that your blood glucose levels are awry, and you want someone close knowing how to help you. What Causes Dizziness? There are many reasons why someone might feel dizzy, not all of them related to diabetes. Maybe the room is too hot, or the person feeling dizzy is overdressed or dehydrated. Sometimes certain medications, an ear infection or a migraine can cause dizziness. Stress can also bring on the room-spinning feeling or sensation you may faint. If dizziness often strikes after you sit or stand up suddenly, but goes away when you sit or lie down, it is probably due to postural hypertension (a sudden drop in blood pressure), which is quite common in older people. With dizziness caused by stress or heat, a cool glass of water or a bit of fresh air will help you recover completely within a very short time. Maybe a trip to your doctor is in order if you suspect your medication or an ear infection is to blame. But since there is a chance your body is using dizziness as an early warning system, you should always check your blood sugar levels if you self-test, or get them checked if dizzy spells become frequent if you don’t test your sugar levels with finger prick testing. Dizziness and Blood Glucose Levels As is often the case with fairly vague symptoms like d Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

Diabetes Related Vertigo: Causes And Treatment

Diabetes Related Vertigo: Causes And Treatment

Vertigo is an abnormal sensation of motion that can happen when a person is sitting still or when their movement through space is inaccurately sensed. Knowing where we are in space and how we are moving requires reliable information from five senses: Our vision orients movement by taking cues from vertical objects and the horizon. Our inner ear orients us to angular movements as we turn our head and to our acceleration as we move forward. Touch orients us as our weight presses us against things (e.g., feet to the ground, butt to a chair). Proprioception detects the position of our neck and limbs as we move. Our hearing orients us to objects reflecting sound and to sound emitting objects. Any impairment of these senses can lead to an experience of vertigo, disequilibrium or dizziness. Medical issues, including diabetes and heart disease, can potentially disrupt the functioning of these senses through nerve damage or circulation impairment. Vertigo and Disequilibrium Spinning vertigo is when either the environment appears to be spinning or a person feels that they are spinning within the environment. Positional vertigo is a spinning sensation occurring after a person repositions their head. A spinning sensation is often caused by inner ear problems. Disequilibrium is the sensation of an impending fall or the need of external assistance to maneuver from here to there. Some people describe a floating sensation or that the floor or room appears tilted. This can be an inner ear or other motion-sensory issue, or it can originate in the central nervous system. All experiences of vertigo and disequilibrium should be reported to your physician. Treatment, which might bring resolution or involve lifestyle adjustments, will depend on discovering and addressing the cause or causes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

DIABETES SAFETY FIRST! Recognizing and Preventing Low Blood Sugar Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Low blood sugar feels different to different people, so learn to know y Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Thought the only sign of being diabetic is being overweight? Think again... Around 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes, yet according to Diabetes UK, around 590,000 suffer - but they don't even know about it. And while diabetes - a lifelong condition - can be successfully managed once it’s diagnosed, delaying that diagnosis puts people at risk of serious complications, including amputation and blindness. This is a key concern for Type 2 diabetes, the type associated with weight which accounts for around 90% of all cases. Type 2 occurs when the body can no longer make enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas which enables us to use sugar/glucose), or the insulin being produced isn’t doing its job properly. Type 1, on the other hand, has absolutely nothing to do with weight or lifestyle and tends to develop during childhood when a fault in the body causes insulin-producing cells to be destroyed. “The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 are very similar, however they tend to come on a lot quicker in Type 1, and you can end up very poorly and in hospital if not diagnosed straight away,” says Diabetes UK clinical advisor Libby Dowling. “Type 2 is a little different. A lot of people put the symptoms of Type 2 down to getting older, and the condition can sometimes go undiagnosed for up to 10 years, by which time complications could have started to develop.” [Read more: Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 - Do you know the difference?] But, aside from increased thirst, needing to be more and tiredness, what are those symptoms? Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Know The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can be a very serious condition, with extreme cases causing seizures, coma, and even death. It occurs when blood sugar levels drop too low, and it is most often experienced by people with diabetes. As you learn about diabetes management, being well versed in low blood sugar symptoms will enable you to detect the signs of impending hypoglycemia and act quickly to head it off or minimize its impact. Diabetes Type and Hypoglycemia Risk Hypoglycemia risk varies across the three different types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia most often, as their diabetes management often requires a lot of attention and careful planning. The average person with type 1 diabetes who is attempting aggressive disease control may still experience low blood sugar symptoms frequently, and a full-blown case of hypoglycemia will require close medical attention. "When it comes to type 1 diabetes, the body can't make insulin on its own, so it must be administered," notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, Everyday Health contributor and author of Belly Fat for Dummies. Paying close attention to your diet is important, too. "If the correct amount of insulin is given based on the amount of carbohydrates consumed, blood sugar levels can remain in a healthy range." Type 2 Diabetes These patients experience hypoglycemia less frequently than people with type 1 diabetes; the rate of hypoglycemia for type 2 diabetes patients taking insulin is about one-third that of type 1 diabetes patients. But research shows that the frequency of hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes increases as the disease becomes more advanced. "In people with type 2 diabetes, the body may produce adequate insulin, yet the cells are resistant to it, making the insulin ineffecti Continue reading >>

Dizziness And Loss Of Balance In Individuals With Diabetes: Relative Contribution Of Vestibular Versus Somatosensory Dysfunction

Dizziness And Loss Of Balance In Individuals With Diabetes: Relative Contribution Of Vestibular Versus Somatosensory Dysfunction

Go to: Design and Methods Thirty-seven patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes who had complaints of dizziness, loss of balance, or falling and were referred to a specialized balance disorders clinic were examined to determine whether vestibular dysfunction, somatosensory dysfunction, or a combination of the two was most likely to contribute to postural disturbance. No subjects had examination evidence of orthostasis or neurological dysfunction other than known peripheral neuropathy. Visual acuities better than 20/40 were present in all patients. The study protocol was approved by the Florida State University institutional review board, and all patients provided written informed consent. The patients were evaluated for polyneuropathy using a scoring system developed by Valk et al.9 Tested modalities included strength, deep tendon reflexes, proprioception, vibration, pain, and touch. Vestibular testing consisted of oculomotor examination, Romberg and sharpened Romberg tests, Hallpike’s maneuver, and Quix’s test.10 The relative contribution of somatosensory (proprioceptive) and vestibular systems to postural stability were quantitatively analyzed using a computer-linked platform system (EQUITEST Neurocom, Clackamas, Ore.) that examined sway and shear forces (i.e., center of gravity displacements). The system allows analysis of performance of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems individually and in varying combinations under both stable and destabilizing conditions. A balance score calculated as a percentage of body sway compared to maximal allowable sway of 12.5° is then assigned. Continue reading >>

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