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Type 2 Diabetes And Bruising

Diabetes: Protect Your Feet And Legs

Diabetes: Protect Your Feet And Legs

If you have diabetes, you are more likely than people without this disorder to develop leg and foot problems. Diabetes can destroy nerves and cause you to have poor circulation. Left unchecked, these complications can lead to amputation. But there's a lot you can do to prevent that from happening. How Diabetes Causes Limb Problems First, it's important to understand what causes these diabetes complications. According to Marilyn Tan, MD, an endocrinologist and the clinic chief of the Stanford Endocrine Clinic in California, risk factors include poor circulation from atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease, poor wound healing, and uncontrolled blood sugar increases, which increases the risk of infection. “Think of sugar as fuel for bacteria and fungus,” says Dr. Tan. Researchers also know that high blood glucose levels can cause nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy. The damage can occur in any part of your body, but it is most common in your arms and legs, with the lower extremities affected first. This type of nerve damage is known as peripheral neuropathy. Some people have no symptoms, while others experience numbness, tingling, burning, sharp pain, cramps, extreme sensitivity when touched, and a loss of coordination and balance. When you have peripheral neuropathy, small sores can go unnoticed because of the numbness — you simply don’t feel them. Left untreated, these little problems can become major infections that invade the bones. What’s more, poor circulation from diabetes means any ulcers and infections are harder to heal. If an infection invades your bones, then amputation could be required to save your life. “Diabetes is the leading cause of nontraumatic lower extremity (leg and foot) amputations in the United States,” says Tan. “Five perc Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes symptoms Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90% of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. "Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don't know it," says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, see your doctor. Watch the video: 5 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Increased urination, excessive thirst If you need to urinate frequently—particularly if you often have to get up at night to use the bathroom—it could be a symptom of diabetes. The kidneys kick into high gear to get rid of all that extra glucose in the blood, hence the urge to relieve yourself, sometimes several times during the night. The excessive thirst means your body is trying to replenish those lost fluids. These two symptoms go hand in hand and are some of "your body's ways of trying to manage high blood sugar," explains Dr. Collazo-Clavell. Weight loss Overly high blood sugar levels can also cause rapid weight loss, say 10 to 20 pounds over two or three months—but this is not a healthy weight loss. Because the insulin hormone isn't getting glucose into the cells, where it can be used as energy, the body thinks it's starving and starts breaking down protein from the muscles as an alternate source of fuel. The kidneys are also working overtime to eliminate the excess sugar, and this leads to a loss of calories (and can harm the kidneys). "These are processes that require a lot of energy," Dr. Collazo-Clavell notes. "You create a calorie deficit." Hunger Continue reading >>

Unexplained Bruising Have You Feeling Blue? Here Are Six Possible Reasons Why You Have Them

Unexplained Bruising Have You Feeling Blue? Here Are Six Possible Reasons Why You Have Them

Unexplained Bruising Have You Feeling Blue? Here Are Six Possible Reasons Why You Have Them You wake up with a faint trail of bruises down your leg. Depending on what you were up to the day before, a few possibilities race through your mind. Did I whack my leg on something while I was at the gym? Did I fall down at the bar? Did I just have a run-in with my bedpost? Mysterious bruises plague many of us, and they can be disconcerting. Most of the time, we just forget minor bumps and injuries that can cause bruises, leaving us confused when we start turning purple. In rare cases, though, sudden and unexplained bruising can be a symptom of something more serious than a forgotten clumsy moment. Here are six possible reasons for unexplained bruising, ranging from the easily remedied to some concerning problems. Certain vitamins have a role in making blood, clotting cuts, and healing wounds. Minor deficiencies of these vitamins may not cause any symptoms, but if the shortage is allowed to progress, a multitude of symptoms can arise, including bruising. Vitamin B12 works with folate to make the DNA of red blood cells.A deficiency can cause bruises to appear more easily than usual. Vitamin K is important for clotting, and a lack of it can lead to leaky blood vessels, which in turn could be responsible for mysterious bruises. Lastly, Vitamin C is responsible for synthesizing collagen and other proteins that make skin and blood vessels. Unsurprisingly, a lack of it makes blood vessels weak and more susceptible to breakage, aka bruising. Introducing more vitamin-rich foods to your diet or taking a multivitamin can help clear up nutritional deficiency, and any annoying bruises it may have caused. Unfortunately, aging is an inescapable cause of bruising. Aging skin may appear thinne Continue reading >>

Unexplained Bruises

Unexplained Bruises

Alice, I seem to be having a lot of unexplained bruises, especially on my arms. My husband is worried that it could be a symptom of diabetes, which runs in my family. Does bruising have anything to do with diabetes? — Black and blue Dear Black and blue, There are many reasons why bruises may unexpectedly appear; however, diabetes is an unlikely suspect. The connection between "bruising" and diabetes that your husband may be referring to is a condition called acanthosis nigricans, where patches of brown to black skin accumulate in the folds and creases of their bodies — usually in the armpits and neck. This hyper-pigmentation happens because insulin "spills over" into the skin due to insulin resistance associated with type 2 diabetes. Another connection is that sometimes bruises heal slower in people with diabetes; however, this wouldn't explain why you are noticing more bruises in the first place. If you are worried about diabetes, there are more telling warning signs that are associated with the condition. For example, increased thirst and urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, and frequent infections may result from a high blood-sugar level. Unlike acanthosis nigricans, bruises are caused by leakage of blood after an injury. The list of usual suspects includes bumping into bedposts or other objects and not remembering, rigorous exercising (which can cause tiny tears in blood vessels, particularly in athletes and weightlifters), and old age. Some people, especially women, are more prone to bruising than others, so one possible explanation may be that you are less likely to notice the injury that triggered the bruising. Moreover, as people grow older and continue to expose themselves to the damaging effects of the sun, the skin becomes more Continue reading >>

What Common Medications Cause Bleeding And Bruising In People With Diabetes

What Common Medications Cause Bleeding And Bruising In People With Diabetes

Diabetes may have an impact on your circulation, which makes it easier for your skin to get bruised. In fact, increased bruising on the legs is a possible symptom of diabetes. Learn what common medications can cause bleeding and bruising for people with diabetes. People with diabetes are more prone to get bruised and have superficial bleeding due to related circulatory disruptions. Some common prescriptions, over-the-counter medications and supplements can cause bleeding and bruising. Knowing more about these medications helps you make an educated choice with your diabetes health care team. Aspirin or ibuprofen might be recommended to manage pain and reduce inflammation. These OTC medications are blood-thinning and can boost your risk of bleeding and bruising. This risk is increased if you are taking a non-prescription medication, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, with an anticoagulant. Commonly prescribed anticoagulants include clipidogrel, warfarin and enoxaparin. People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease. Often anticoagulants are prescribed to patients with cardiovascular problems or a stroke. Talk to your health care team about possible contraindications when you are taking anticoagulants and your bleeding risk. Chemotherapy and steroids are often prescribed for patients with cancer. Both can worsen the symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to fluctuating blood sugar levels from dehydration. This can also put patients at higher risk of bruising. Steroids may also be prescribed for other health conditions, including skin rashes. They may cause a patient’s blood sugar to rise and should be carefully monitored by your health care team. If you have unexplained bruises, report it. Never stop taking prescription medication until you consult with your Continue reading >>

Life With Diabetes: Blood And Bruises

Life With Diabetes: Blood And Bruises

Sometimes it feels like I am at war with my body. Blood and bruises. There is dried blood on the sleeves of my t-shirt and a small spot on the back of my underwear. Blood spurts to the surface of my calloused fingers 8 to 10 times a day and I lick it away. There is a bruise on the right side of my belly button and on the back side of my left arm that I noticed when I was at the gym. The bruises take a long time to fade, turning from blue to yellow. These markings are like tattoos. They are what’s visible of my invisible disease. I hate the sight of blood. Growing up in the woods of Vermont I saw a fair share of blood, such as when the hunters drove by our house with deer carcasses slung in the bed of their truck or when my dad beheaded a chicken for dinner. Blood terrified me then, and it still does now. A few weeks ago my youngest child got hurt at a birthday party at his cousin’s house. A soccer goal fell and cut his face, close to his eye, and we had to take him to the ER for stitches. When it was finally time to numb the area I stood by his bedside and held his hand while the doctor inserted a large needle into his face. The cut was red and deep, and I felt myself getting weak. I held tighter to my baby’s hand while he cried, and I tried to take deep breaths, but the next thing I knew I was lying on the floor. It felt like those terrible memories of waking up after a bad low blood sugar. The nurse was standing above me asking if I was OK. “I have Type 1 diabetes,” I said. “I need to test my sugar.” I was fine. My blood sugar was 95. It was the blood on my baby’s face that made me pass out. I felt like a failure. I wasn’t there when my child needed me, and even though I was relieved that it wasn’t a result of low blood sugar, I was angry with my p Continue reading >>

10 Indicative Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

10 Indicative Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Home Your Health 10 Indicative Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes 10 Indicative Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes By: Emily Lockhart on Tuesday, September 17th Its not a lowered immunity! Due to blood vessel damage from increased glucose in the veins, type 2 diabetes sufferers often experience restricted blood flow. This often causes a decrease in the time needed to heal surface abrasions, bruises, cuts, skin rashes, and infections. For type II diabetics, this slow rate of healing results from a lack of blood flow to the extremities. This means that cuts, bruising, burns, and abrasions that occur on the feet, legs, knees, hands, and arms get lower blood circulating to those areas. Fresh blood flow to any area is the bodys method to encourage the healing process. Type II Diabetes is a grueling health condition to manageyou have to constantly keep tabs on your blood sugar, prepare a healthy diet, read each and every food label, try to... I bet if you don't have diabetes, you know someone who does. However, if you have just been diagnosed with diabetes, know that you are one of over 17 million Americans with 2,200... A type 2 diabetes diagnosis is a scary thingparticularly when its your child who has the health issue. The holiday season is a very tempting time of your to fill your mouth with empty carbohydrates and sweets, which can be unhealthy especially if you have diabetes. A new study suggests that a low-fat vegan diet could help reduce the pain and discomfort associated with type 2 diabetes.The study,which was carried out by a team led by Dr. Being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes can present an individual with a number of significant health challenges that require substantial lifestyle changes. If you have Type I or Type II diabetes, you're well aware that careand management of y Continue reading >>

Bruising?? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Bruising?? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am bruising very easily.. In fact I have more little bruises on my legs than my infant school child!!?? Is this a sign of something to do with my diabetes? I used to bruise on my thighs before I changed to a 4mm needle Oh right, apologies for assuming they were needle marks. In that case, it's something I've never heard before and you should let your nurse/doctor know. Nobody should bruise for no reason, however, some are more prone than others. Some meds will make bruising easier too, wolferin for example. That's odd then. Got no answer for you in that case I'm afraid! Think I read somewhere (could even have been on here!) that this is something to do with your liver not working as efficiently as it could. Before diagnosis I noticed that any bruises I had took ages to heal and the doctor suggested fatty liver. Now my diabetes is under control this doesn't appear to happen any more,in fact just out of hospital for an op and all my bruises are healing really well so there could be something in it. Hi, my mum bruises very easily - its got something to do with her red/white cells!!!!???? She is on Warfren daily for the rest of her life, it also has to be monitored extremely carefully by the hospital as the need for it in her body can fluctuate, if not monitored carefully it can kill, so im told. Its also used as a rat poison. It thins the blood out of clotting. So please ask your doctor about this. She's just been in hospital for 4 weeks (she is 75) with internal bleeding all due to clotting even though no signs of bruising were evident. Go and see him/her. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Sores | Symptom No 7 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Sores | Symptom No 7 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Sores, Wounds Or Bruises Diabetes sores, wounds and bruises are very common skin changes for a diabetic with type 2 diabetes symptoms. A side-effect of high blood sugar is the reduced ability of your skin to heal properly. You may find that cuts and sores are slow to heal and may become more easily infected. This is due to poor circulation, nerve damage and an impaired immune system. Your skin is your body’s largest organ and is vulnerable to the effects of elevated blood sugar. It is important to recognize that the condition of your skin and the reduced ability to heal can be an indicator for diabetes sores or wounds problems, caused by type 2 symptoms of diabetes. As many as a third of people with type 2 diabetes will have a skin condition related to their disease at some time in their lives. The most common cause of bacterial skin infections in diabetics is the Staphylococcus bacteria, or staph infection. Another common cause is that diabetes affects the flow of the blood. Without proper blood flow, it takes longer for any wound, cut, sore, blister or bruise to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease and puts diabetics at risk not only for frequent healing wounds but also for infections. Skin infections left untreated can fester and worsen to the point that gangrene can develop. This is why you sometimes hear of diabetics having a toe, foot even part of a leg amputated. Research indicates that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper care when problems develop. A type 2 symptom of diabetes can start with something simple like a blister that becomes infected and develops into a sore. Checking your skin regularly is part of a good health care regime. Other type 2 diabetes symptoms, like nerv Continue reading >>

Easy Bruising, Fatigue And Weight Gain

Easy Bruising, Fatigue And Weight Gain

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms easy bruising, fatigue and weight gain including Medication reaction or side-effect, Diabetes, type 2, and Depression (Adult). There are 88 conditions associated with easy bruising, fatigue and weight gain. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Medication reaction or side-effect Medication side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, dizziness, seizures, and more. Diabetes, type 2 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Depression (Adult) Depression is a painful sadness that interferes with daily life and includes hopelessness, anxiety, and more. Congestive heart failure People with congestive heart failure can have shortness of breath, fatigue, irregular heartbeat and more. Hypothyroidism (adult) Hypothyroidism your body functions slow down, making you gain weight and feel tired all the time. Multiple sclerosis Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the nervous system causing difficulties with balance, speech, and movement. Depression (Child and Adolescent) Depression is a painful sadness that interferes with a child's schoolwork, family life, and social activities. Pre-leukemia (myelodysplastic syndrome) Myelodysplastic syndromes are diseases that affect the bone marrow and blood, causing anemia and tiredness. Mononucleosis Mononucleosis is a viral infection causing extreme fatigue, sore throat, fever, rash, muscle aches, and more. Anemia Anemia, a lack of red blood cells, can cause fatigue, pale skin, weakness, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

Unexplained Bruising: Causes, Diabetes Connection & The Life-cycle Of A Bruise

Unexplained Bruising: Causes, Diabetes Connection & The Life-cycle Of A Bruise

A bruise is also known as a contusion. It is the result of blood from damaged blood cells that are deep beneath the skin and collect near the skin’s surface. But what does unexplained bruising mean? Unexplained bruising can be the result of numerous causes from aging and vitamin deficiencies to diabetes. Random bruising could be a sign of a health issue that should be checked out. Bruising for no reason can be explained and treated. But first, we need to look at the different types of bruises and what causes them. In this article: Types of Bruises There are two types of bruises that you should be aware of—ecchymosis and hematoma. 1. Ecchymosis This type of bruising is the one you are most familiar with. These bruises end up being a flat, purple-colored bruise. The bruise is caused when blood cells are damaged, and blood leaks into the top layers of the skin. 2. Hematoma A hematoma is what you might refer to as a “goose egg.” A lot of damaged blood cells collects and clots under the skin, raising it into a lump or bump. The area tends to be swollen and painful. A hematoma tends to be the result of a greater trauma than ecchymosis. Unexplained Bruising Causes What causes unexplained bruising? Now, you’ve read about what causes bruises, so it may seem a little odd that a bruise should suddenly form on its own. These unexplained bruises can be the result of many factors ranging from the simple effects of aging to the warning signs of disease. But, the simpler explanations may surprise you. Unknown bruising is acutally the result of certain factors that can cause you to bruise easier. 1. Vitamin Deficiency Vitamin deficiencies of various sorts can lead to unexplained bruises. For example, vitamin C is used by the body to strengthen blood vessels. A lack of vitamin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

How Can I Heal Bruised Fingers?

How Can I Heal Bruised Fingers?

I've had type 1 diabetes for over 50 years. For the past 30 years I've used a blood glucose meter, sticking my finger and testing four times a day. My fingers are starting to turn purple, even though my current meter requires very little blood. Is there anything I can do to heal this? Christy L. Parkin, MSN, RN, CDE, responds: What to Know: Before testing, wash your hands in warm water and let your arm dangle at your side for a minute or so. This allows the blood to flow down into the fingertips. There is no need to use alcohol if you wash your hands. Alcohol dries and toughens skin over time, making it hard to obtain a drop of blood. Possible Solutions: To help with bruised fingertips, it may be time to update your lancing device. Newer models are extremely gentle and minimize the trauma of lancing the fingertips several times a day. If you are not using a lancing device already, this will help a lot (some people use the lancet without the device; this definitely hurts more and can cause more bruising). Use the lowest possible setting on the device to avoid a deep stick while giving an adequate amount of blood. The least painful place to prick is on the sides of the fingertips. Because it is important to rotate sites, be sure to use both sides of the finger. Avoid testing on the pad of the finger; there are more nerve endings there that cause more pain. Pinky fingers can be a great place to prick for the best blood flow. Some blood glucose meters let you test alternate sites, such as the upper arm, thigh, calf, and palm. These sites contain fewer nerves than the fingertips and may give your fingers some relief. Because there is a lag effect, alternate-site testing should be used only when blood glucose is stable, such as before a meal or when fasting. Always check from Continue reading >>

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