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Type 2 Diabetes And Bone Fractures

Fracture Risk Assessment In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Fracture Risk Assessment In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

Volume 20, Issue 3 , JulySeptember 2017, Pages 432-443 Fracture Risk Assessment in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus Author links open overlay panel CatalinaPoiana Diabetes mellitus, both type 1 and type 2 (T2DM), is associated with decreased bone strength as well as increased fracture risk. Bone mineral density is decreased in type 1 diabetes but increased in T2DM, compared with controls. This suggests alterations in bone quality are a major player in the pathogenesis of fragility fractures in patients with diabetes. The link between diabetes and bone appears to be mediated by complex pathways, including the insulin-insulin growth factors system, accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in bone collagen, microangiopathy, and increased bone marrow fat content. Bone fragility in T2DM, which is not reflected by bone mineral density and bone mass reduction, depends on deterioration of bone quality. Also, at least in T2DM, the classical diagnosis of osteoporosis by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and the fracture risk estimation by FRAX (fracture risk assessment tool) are only partially useful in assessing fracture risk. Trabecular bone score and trabecular bone score-adjusted FRAX offer an enhanced estimation of fracture risk in these patients. Specific risk stratification criteria are needed in the future. The development of improved methods to assess the material properties of bone to better characterize fracture risk is also a priority. Adequate glycemic control is generally associated with decreased fracture risk, with the exception of specific antidiabetics (thiazolidinediones, canagliflozin) that have been shown to have a detrimental effect. Most currently used antiosteoporotic treatments seem equally effective in diabetic patients as compared with patients wi Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Type 2 Diabetes On Bone Fracture Healing

The Impact Of Type 2 Diabetes On Bone Fracture Healing

The Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on Bone Fracture Healing 1Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 2PrometheusDivision of Skeletal Tissue Engineering Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 3BiomaterialsBIOMAT, Department of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 1Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 2PrometheusDivision of Skeletal Tissue Engineering Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 1Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 2PrometheusDivision of Skeletal Tissue Engineering Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 2PrometheusDivision of Skeletal Tissue Engineering Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 3BiomaterialsBIOMAT, Department of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 1Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 2PrometheusDivision of Skeletal Tissue Engineering Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 3BiomaterialsBIOMAT, Department of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 4Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Edited by: Ann Schwartz, University of California, San Francisco, United States Reviewed by: Nicola Napoli, Universit Campus Bio-Medico, Italy; Beata Lecka-Czernik, University of Toledo, United States *Correspondence: Katleen Vandamme, [email protected] Specialty section: This article was submitted to Bone Research, a section of the journal Frontiers in Endocrinology Received 2017 Sep 19; Accepted 2018 Jan 5. Copyright 2018 Marin, Luyte Continue reading >>

Study Finds Link Between Type 1 Diabetes And Increased Risk Of Bone Fractures In Men

Study Finds Link Between Type 1 Diabetes And Increased Risk Of Bone Fractures In Men

Study finds link between type 1 diabetes and increased risk of bone fractures in men A Norwegian study has established that men with type 1 diabetes are more likely to suffer bone fractures because of lower bone density, poorer bone quality and a lower rate of bone growth. The study results were announced today by Astrid Kamilla Stunes and Unni Syversen of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, at ECTS 2017, the 44th European Calcified Tissue Society Congress being held in Salzburg, Austria. Our aim was to investigate the quality and density of bones in men with type 1 diabetes mellitus . We studied 33 men aged 20-63 with the diabetes and, for comparison, 28 healthy men of comparable age. Compared to the healthy men, we found, using X-ray and other tools, that men with type 1 diabetes displayed lower bone density across the whole body, together with more frequent bone disease, such as preosteoporosis and osteoporosis, at their hips. They also had a lower trabecular bone score - this is a measure of bone microarchitecture that, alongside bone density, is a good predictor of fracture risk. And their bones had significantly lower mechanical strength. These findings were supported by blood samples, which also confirmed that there were no significant differences between those with diabetes and the healthy men in levels of calcium, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D3, which are often associated with bone disease. Our findings strongly support the conclusion that there is a direct association in men between type 1 diabetes mellitus and an increased likelihood of bone fractures, which might be explained by impaired bone quality and decreased bone density. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Bone Fracture Healing Time

Type 2 Diabetes And Bone Fracture Healing Time

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 diabetes and bone fracture healing time I am a type 2 diabetic, on Metformin. 8 weeks ago I managed to fracture my finger, and have had to wear a splint for that amount of time. I was told I should wear it for 6 - 8 weeks at the fracture clinic, but now, having removed it, I find it still misshapen, swollen and painful if I touch it. I only have to attend the fracture clinic again on 19th Jan. if I have problems, otherwise I should cancel the appointment. Can anyone tell me whether it takes longer for fractures to heal if you are type 2 diabetic, or if this is what I should expect and is the norm. If it appears mis-shapen then perhaps you need another X-ray to determine whether it has,in fact ,healed up in the correct position.Having been in a splint for a while it will take quite a lot of gentle exercise to get the joint working again.Once the joint is being used then the swelling should also go down. the tighter your BG control is to non-diabetic levels, during the healing, the quicker it will be. That means keeping around 5 at ALL times. Ask for plenty of test strips and "eat to your meter". They should let you have strips under these circumstances. The consequences of imperfect healing are horrible.( SORRY!!!!) It takes most things longer to heal if your BG is too high. Having said which I have a few horror stories about unhealed fractures/dislocations in nondiabetics too, any problems *definitely* go back and see them ASAP. Thanks for the information. Much appreciated. I, stumbled on this thread whilst looking for something else but thought I'd put in my threepenneth worth. I had a road accident in 1999 and ended up with srews and plates i Continue reading >>

The Association Of Diabetes Mellitus And Gender With Risk Of Bone Fractures: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

The Association Of Diabetes Mellitus And Gender With Risk Of Bone Fractures: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Review Article - Biomedical Research (2017) Volume 28, Issue 18 The association of diabetes mellitus and gender with risk of bone fractures: A systematic review and meta-analysis Mansour Amraei 1 # , Shahram Mohamadpour 2 , Yaser Seifinejad 3 , Seyedeh Fatemeh Mousavi 4 , Ehsan Shirzadpour 3 # , Safoura Mohamadpour 4 and Ardeshir Moayeri 2 * 1 Department of Clinical Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran 2 Department of Clinical Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran 3 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran 4 Prevention of Psychosocial Injuries Research Center, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran # These authors have equally contributed to this study. Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Iran Visit for more related articles at Biomedical Research Bone fracture shows a growing trend. This increase is a result of several factors occurs. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed to examine the relationship of fracture risk with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and gender. For this purpose, we searched the credible databases including PubMed, ISI, and Scopus for the related epidemiologic studies that were published up to May 2016. The data provided in these articles was extracted and then analyzed by a random-effects model. Funnel plot was used to check for publication bias. Statistical analyses were carried out by R version 3.2.1 and STATA (version 11.1). After filtering irrelevant articles, 30 studies were selected for meta-analysis. The analyses showed that type 2 diabetes mellitus is positively associated with overall fracture risk (summary RR=1.05, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.06). The incidence of fractures was higher in men th Continue reading >>

Insulin Use And Excess Fracture Risk In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Propensity-matched Cohort Analysis

Insulin Use And Excess Fracture Risk In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Propensity-matched Cohort Analysis

Insulin use and Excess Fracture Risk in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Propensity-Matched cohort analysis Scientific Reportsvolume7, Articlenumber:3781 (2017) Despite normal to high bone mineral density, patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have an increased fracture risk. T2DM medications could partially account for this excess risk. The aim of this study was to assess the association between insulin use and bone fracture risk in T2DM patients. A population-based matched cohort study based on a primary care records database validated for research use (Catalonia, Spain) was performed. Propensity score (PS) for insulin use was calculated using logistic regression including predefined predictors of fractures. A total of 2,979 insulin users and 14,895 non-users were observed for a median of 1.42 and 4.58 years respectively. Major fracture rates were 11.2/1,000 person-years for insulin users, compared with 8.3/1,000 among non-users. Matched models confirmed a significant association, with an adjusted subhazard ratio (adj SHR) of 1.38 [95% CI 1.06 to 1.80] for major fractures. No differences between types of insulin or different regimens were found. Estimated number needed to harm (fracture) was 82 (95% CI 32 to 416). Insulin use appears to be associated with a 38% excess fracture risk among T2DM patients in the early stages of the disease. Fracture risk should be included among the considerations to initiate insulin treatment. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have an increased risk of bone fractures 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10 , 11 , 12 , 13 despite a normal to high bone mineral density (BMD) compared with non-diabetic subjects 10 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 . Although the mechanisms underlying this observed excess fracture risk among T2DM patients remain Continue reading >>

Insulin Does Not Increase Fracture Risk Over Oral Diabetes Agents

Insulin Does Not Increase Fracture Risk Over Oral Diabetes Agents

Insulin Does Not Increase Fracture Risk Over Oral Diabetes Agents Commentary by Karel Kostev, PhD and Jakob Starup-Linde, MD, PhD Data from more than 100,000 people with type 2 diabetes did not show an increased risk of fracture among those taking insulin versus oral antidiabetes agents, according to a long-term study published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy. In fact, insulin use was linked to a lower risk of fractures, although this difference was not statistically significant. Hypoglycemic events are associated with an increased risk of falling, and hypoglycemia is more common in people treated with insulin compared to oral antidiabetics like metformin or also incretins, said lead author Karel Kostev, PhD, Senior Manager Epidemiology Research, IMS Health. On the other hand, sulfonylurea therapy also is known to be associated with hypoglycemia. This investigation found that insulin was not associated with a significant difference in fracture risk compared with oral antidiabetes agents, Dr Kostev said. The study by Pscherer et al highlights that the observed increased fracture risk in patients with type 2 diabetes cannot be explained by a specific antidiabetic drug, commented Jakob Starup-Linde, MD, PhD, Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. However, prevention of hypoglycemic events may decrease fracture risk within these individuals. Furthermore, besides a possible reducing effect on hypoglycemic events by insulin glargine, it also may cause a more stable blood glucose level. Diabetes is a condition with low bone turnover, and fluctuations in blood glucose (with high plasma glucose levels) is associated with a decreased bone turnover. These fluctuations may have detrimental effects on Continue reading >>

Fracture Risk In Type 2 Diabetes: Current Perspectives And Gender Differences

Fracture Risk In Type 2 Diabetes: Current Perspectives And Gender Differences

Fracture Risk in Type 2 Diabetes: Current Perspectives and Gender Differences Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Messina, Messina, Italy Received 9 June 2016; Revised 19 September 2016; Accepted 22 September 2016 Copyright 2016 Giuseppina T. Russo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with an increased risk of osteoporotic fractures, resulting in disabilities and increased mortality. The pathophysiological mechanisms linking diabetes to osteoporosis have not been fully explained, but alterations in bone structure and quality are well described in diabetic subjects, likely due to a combination of different factors. Insulin deficiency and dysfunction, obesity and hyperinsulinemia, altered level of oestrogen, leptin, and adiponectin as well as diabetes-related complications, especially peripheral neuropathy, orthostatic hypotension, or reduced vision due to retinopathy may all be associated with an impairment in bone metabolism and with the increased risk of fractures. Finally, medications commonly used in the treatment of T2DM may have an impact on bone metabolism and on fracture risk, particularly in postmenopausal women. When considering the impact of hypoglycaemic drugs on bone, it is important to balance their potential direct effects on bone quality with the risk of falling-related fractures due to the associated hypoglycaemic risk. In this review, experimental and clinical evidence connecting bone metabolism and fracture risk to T2DM is discussed, with particular emphasis on hypoglycaemic treatments and gender Continue reading >>

Bone Fractures And Glucose-lowering Drugs In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Bone Fractures And Glucose-lowering Drugs In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

This study investigated certain drugs (SGLT2 inhibitors) that control blood sugars to see if they caused an increased risk of bone fractures (breakages) in type 2 diabetic patients. The study found no association between the drugs and bone fractures. Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at a high risk of bone fractures, especially elderly patients. A number of complications of T2D may be the cause of this, but the exact reasons for the increased risk are unclear. The T2D complications that may contribute are low blood sugars, nerve damage, eye damage, and kidney disease. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are drugs that lower blood sugar levels by increasing the amount of sugar passed out of the body in urine. Whether this affects calcium and phosphate levels (nutrients needed for good bone health) is unclear. This study analyzed the results of 38 previous clinical trials, including 30,384 T2D patients. The three SGLT2 inhibitor drugs analyzed in these trials were canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance). Patients were followed from 24 to 160 weeks. In the groups treated with SGLT2 inhibitors, the bone fracture rates were 1.59%. This was not significantly different from the 1.56% fracture rate seen in the comparison group (patients treated with other medications or a placebo, a substance with no effect on the body). None of the individual drugs were associated with increased risk of bone fracture. It was noted that there was a weak connection between SGLT2 inhibitor drugs and the Asian population in terms of risk of fracture. The study concluded that SGLT2 inhibitor drugs do not increase the risk of fractures in T2D patients. This study included trials that had relatively short follow-up periods. Continue reading >>

Fracture Risk In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Possible Risk Factors: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Fracture Risk In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Possible Risk Factors: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Editor who approved publication: Professor Garry Walsh Ardeshir Moayeri,1 Mahmoud Mohamadpour,2 Seyedeh Fatemeh Mousavi,3 Ehsan Shirzadpour,2 Safoura Mohamadpour,3 Mansour Amraei4 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Epidemiology, Prevention of Psychosocial Injuries Research Center, 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran Aim: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have an increased risk of bone fractures. A variable increase in fracture risk has been reported depending on skeletal site, diabetes duration, study design, insulin use, and so on. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between T2DM with fracture risk and possible risk factors. Methods: Different databases including PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information, and Scopus were searched up to May 2016. All epidemiologic studies on the association between T2DM and fracture risk were included. The relevant data obtained from these papers were analyzed by a random effects model and publication bias was assessed by funnel plot. All analyses were done by R software (version 3.2.1) and STATA (version 11.1). Results: Thirty eligible studies were selected for the meta-analysis. We found a statistically significant positive association between T2DM and hip, vertebral, or foot fractures and no association between T2DM and wrist, proximal humerus, or ankle fractures. Overall, T2DM was associated with an increased risk of any fracture (summary relative risk=1.05, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.06) and increased with age, duration of diabetes, and insulin therapy. Conclusion: Our findings strongly support an association between T2DM and increased risk of overall fracture. These find Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Bone Fractures.

Type 2 Diabetes And Bone Fractures.

Division of Endocrinology, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [email protected] Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2012 Apr;19(2):128-35. doi: 10.1097/MED.0b013e328350a6e1. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss current literature and hypotheses pertaining to the pathophysiology of increased bone fragility and fracture in men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. RECENT FINDINGS: Despite high bone mineral density, studies have shown that men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk for fracture. Complications of T2DM including retinopathy and autonomic dysfunction may contribute to bone fracture by increasing fall risk. Nephropathy may lead to renal osteodystrophy. Lean mass and potentially fat mass, may additionally contribute to skeletal health in diabetes. There is increasing acknowledgement that the marrow microenvironment is critical to efficient bone remodeling. Medications including thiazolidinediones and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may also impair bone remodeling by acting on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and osteoblastogenesis. T2DM is associated with significant alterations in systemic inflammation, advanced glycation end-product accumulation and reactive oxygen species generation. These systemic changes may also directly and adversely impact the remodeling cycle and lead to bone fragility in T2DM, though more research is needed. SUMMARY: Fracture is a devastating event with dismal health consequences. Identifying the extrinsic and intrinsic biochemical causes of bone fracture in T2DM will speed the discovery of effective strategies for fracture prevention and treatment in this at-risk population. Continue reading >>

Bone Fractures And Hypoglycemic Treatment In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Bone Fractures And Hypoglycemic Treatment In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Bone Fractures and Hypoglycemic Treatment in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Matteo Monami, MD, PHD; Barbara Cresci, MD; Angela Colombini, MD; Laura Pala, MD; Daniela Balzi, MD; Francesca Gori, MD; Veronica Chiasserini, MD; Niccol Marchionni, MD; Carlo Maria Rotella, MD; Edoardo Mannucci, MD Objective: Hypoglycemic treatments could modulate the risk for fractures in many ways. Most studies have not explored the effect on the incidence of bone fractures of individual oral hypoglycemic agents, rather all oral treatments as a whole. The aim of this case-control study, nested within a retrospective cohort, is the assessment of the risk for bone fractures associated with exposure to insulin or different oral hypoglycemic agents. Research Design and Methods: A case-control study nested within a cohort of 1,945 diabetic outpatients with a follow-up of 4.1 2.3 years was performed, comparing 83 case subjects of bone fractures and 249 control subjects matched for age, sex, duration of diabetes, BMI, A1C, comorbidity, smoking, and alcohol abuse. Exposure to hypoglycemic drugs during the 10 years preceding the event (or matching index date) was assessed. Results: In a model including treatment with insulin secretagogues metformin and insulin for at least 36 months during the previous 10 years, no significant association was observed between bone fractures and medications. In an alternative model considering treatments at the time of fracture, insulin treatment was significantly associated with bone fractures in men (OR 3.20 [95% CI 1.32-7.74]) but not in women (1.41 [0.73-2.73]). Conclusions: Insulin-sensitizing treatment with metformin is not associated with a higher incidence of bone fractures, suggesting that the negative effect of thiazolidinediones is due to a specific action on bon Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Bone Fractures

Type 2 Diabetes And Bone Fractures

Kendall F. Moseley, Division of Endocrinology, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Correspondence to Kendall F. Moseley, MD, 5200 Eastern Avenue, MFL Building, Center Tower, Suite 4300, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. Tel: +1 410 550 6497; fax: +1 410 550 6864; [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. To discuss current literature and hypotheses pertaining to the pathophysiology of increased bone fragility and fracture in men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite high bone mineral density, studies have shown that men and women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk for fracture. Complications of T2DM including retinopathy and autonomic dysfunction may contribute to bone fracture by increasing fall risk. Nephropathy may lead to renal osteodystrophy. Lean mass and potentially fat mass, may additionally contribute to skeletal health in diabetes. There is increasing acknowledgement that the marrow microenvironment is critical to efficient bone remodeling. Medications including thiazolidinediones and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may also impair bone remodeling by acting on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and osteoblastogenesis. T2DM is associated with significant alterations in systemic inflammation, advanced glycation end-product accumulation and reactive oxygen species generation. These systemic changes may also directly and adversely impact the remodeling cycle and lead to bone fragility in T2DM, though more research is needed. Fracture is a devastating event with dismal health consequences. Identifying the extrinsic and intrinsic biochemical causes of bone fractur Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors On Bone Fracture Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Network Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

The Effects Of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors On Bone Fracture Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Network Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

The effects of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors on bone fracture among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Contributed equally to this work with: Jun Yang, Chao Huang, Shanshan Wu Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Centre, Beijing, China These authors are joint first authors on this work. Contributed equally to this work with: Jun Yang, Chao Huang, Shanshan Wu Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Centre, Beijing, China These authors are joint first authors on this work. Contributed equally to this work with: Jun Yang, Chao Huang, Shanshan Wu Affiliation: National Clinical Research Center of Digestive Diseases, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China These authors are joint first authors on this work. Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Centre, Beijing, China Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Centre, Beijing, China Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Peking University International Hospital, Beijing, China Affiliation: The Primary Care Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom * E-mail: [email protected] (FS); [email protected] (SYZ) Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Centre, Beijing, China * E-mail: [email protected] (FS); [email protected] (SYZ) Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatist Continue reading >>

Bone Fractures: A Diabetes Complication Often Ignored

Bone Fractures: A Diabetes Complication Often Ignored

Bone Fractures: A Diabetes Complication Often Ignored Many people aren't aware of the connection between diabetes and bone fractures. Find out how you can protect your bones and guard against this complication of diabetes. Videos: Eating Smart With Martha McKittrick, RD If you have diabetes, youve likely been told to be vigilant about blood sugar control. Thats because when unmanaged, diabetes can increase your risk of complications such as heart disease, nerve damage, and kidney failure, according to the American Diabetes Association. But there's a lesser-known yet still serious diabetes complication that youll also need to watch out for: bone fractures. Health care providers often neglect to tell patients with diabetes that they could be at higher risk of bone fractures, says M. James Lenhard, MD, section chief of endocrinology and medical director of the Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Center, the Diabetes and Metabolic Research Center, and the Weight Management Center at the Christiana Care Health System in Wilmington, Delaware. However, it's a real risk that can affect people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In fact, people with type 2 diabetes could have three times greater the risk of bone fracture than those with normal blood sugar, depending on skeleton size and how long someone has had diabetes, according to research published in December 2014 in Metabolism. Type 1 diabetes also increases the risk of bone fractures, according to an animal study. Researchers from the University of Delaware in Newark, where Dr. Lenhard is an adjunct associate professor, and the University of Toronto, found that exercise (normally a good protective step for bone health) did not stimulate bone regeneration as well in mice with high blood sugar levels as it did in mice with Continue reading >>

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