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Type 2 Diabetes And Allergies

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Case Report Severe Allergic Reaction To Human Insulin In The Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Case Report Severe Allergic Reaction To Human Insulin In The Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

1. Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially fatal crisis of diabetes mellitus (DM). In the treatment of DKA, fluid resuscitation, insulin therapy, and electrolyte replacement are important. Rarely, insulin allergies can be developed in the patient treated with insulin. The most common symptoms of insulin allergies are localized and limited. Life-threatening allergic reactions are rarely reported. Insulin allergies can be managed safely and successfully by desensitization treatment.1,2 We present treatment of a patient with DKA who developed an insulin allergy. In this case report, we aimed to discuss DKA treatment options in patient with insulin allergies. 2. Case report A 45-year-old male was brought to our emergency department with chest pain and hyperglycemia. He had a history of type 2 DM and had been using an oral antidiabetic drug for two years, but he had been stopped using for a month. HIs past medical history did not show any drug allergies. His vitals were measured: 1.) blood pressure of 166/98 mmHg; 2.) pulse 100/min; 3.) respiration number 24/min; 4.) O2 saturation 98%; and 5.) temperature 36.0 °C. His electrocardiograms (ECG's) were normal. His blood glucose level was 405 mg/dL, urinary ketones 15 mmol/L, pH was 6.8, HCO3 4.7 mmol/L, and lactate 3.6 mmol/L. Regular insulin (0.1unit/kg IV bolus) was initiated in addition to 2000 mL of intravenous saline, and a 0.1 unit/kg/hour infusion was started. He developed a generalized skin rash, hoarseness, and uvular edema at the 30th minute of treatment, which then expanded to the soft palate. The vital findings were normal except for the presence of tachycardia. At that moment his vitals were measured: 1.) blood pressure 126/75 mmHg; 2.) pulse 104/min; 3.) respiration number 24/min; 4.) O2 saturat Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Tougher In The Summer

Diabetes Is Tougher In The Summer

For people with diabetes, the heat and humidity of summer can be particularly hazardous, reports Anahad O’Connor in today’s “Really?” column. One of the complications of diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2, is an impaired ability to adjust to rises in temperature, which can cause dangerous increases in body temperature during the summer. The underlying problem, nerve damage, occurs in 60 to 70 percent of Americans with diabetes; it can affect nearly every organ in the body, including sweat glands. When nerve damage keeps the sweat glands from working properly, the body fails to cool down as the mercury rises. To learn more read the full column, “The Claim: Diabetes Makes You Sensitive to Heat,” and then please join the discussion below. Continue reading >>

Food Allergies: Are They Increasing?

Food Allergies: Are They Increasing?

Unless you know someone with a food allergy, the act of preparing a meal and eating seems fairly straightforward. For those affected by serious food allergies, ingredients must be carefully read and packaging practices must also be scrutinized to avoid anything from slight discomfort to a life-threatening episode. While it’s clear that food allergies are costly and inconvenient, it remains unclear what causes them, especially when they are increasing at an alarming rate. Exponential increase in the past decade Food allergies have increased in young children by nearly 50 percent between 1997 and 2011, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This is an international problem, as European hospital admissions for anaphylaxis increased seven-fold over a decade of gathered data, according to the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. It’s not just that allergies are increasing in occurrence or frequency of reactions. The American College of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology finds that 30 percent of adults and 40 percent of children are affected by allergies. With allergies becoming more widespread and frequent in occurrence, it’s clear changes need to be made somewhere. Unfortunately, the increase can’t be attributed to a single identifiable cause. Potential causes for the increase Research from the European Molecular Biology Organization found that an increasingly globalized world where people increasingly import of exotic products and incorporate foreign foods into their diets could play a role. Other researchers postulate that the influx of food preservatives and non-natural products have made people more prone to developing food allergies. Whatever the cause of this food allergy increase, most researchers agree that more research is ne Continue reading >>

Wheat And Dairy

Wheat And Dairy

We avoided dairy, gluten, and other allergenic foods with my youngest child, both while I was pregnant, and in his first few years of life. He breastfed exclusively for 6 months, and for a few years afterwards. He still developed diabetes. There has long been debate (and there are innumerable studies) about cow's milk and type 1 diabetes. Recent studies that have followed children over time do find evidence that cow's milk consumption may increase the risk of type 1 diabetes and/or associated autoimmunity, although perhaps depending on genetic risk. For example: A long-term study of U.S. children (beginning at birth) found that greater consumption of cow's milk was associated with the development of type 1-related autoantibodies-- but only in children of low to moderate risk of disease. However, cow's milk consumption was also associated with an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes in all of the antibody-positive children (Lamb et al. 2014). Published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, a double-blind, randomized study assigned genetically at-risk infants to receive either regular cow's milk infant formula, or a a casein hydrolysate formula, when breastmilk was not available in the first 6-8 months of life. Over the next ten years, the children are being analyzed for type 1 diabetes as well as type 1 related autoantibodies. The first results were hopeful: the children given hydrolyzed infant formula had a 50% lower risk of developing type 1 related autoantibodies by age 10. (Since this study did not include people from the general population, whether this intervention will work in people less genetically at risk of type 1 is not known). This study was part of a larger trial, the TRIGR (Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk). TRIGR began Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

Diabetes Mystery: Why Are Type 1 Cases Surging?

When public health officials fret about the soaring incidence of diabetes in the U.S. and worldwide, they are generally referring to type 2 diabetes. About 90 percent of the nearly 350 million people around the world who have diabetes suffer from the type 2 form of the illness, which mostly starts causing problems in the 40s and 50s and is tied to the stress that extra pounds place on the body’s ability to regulate blood glucose. About 25 million people in the U.S. have type 2 diabetes, and another million have type 1 diabetes, which typically strikes in childhood and can be controlled only with daily doses of insulin. For reasons that are completely mysterious, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes has been increasing throughout the globe at rates that range from 3 to 5 percent a year. Although the second trend is less well publicized, it is still deeply troubling, because this form of the illness has the potential to disable or kill people so much earlier in their lives. No one knows exactly why type 1 diabetes is rising. Solving that mystery—and, if possible, reducing or reversing the trend—has become an urgent problem for public health researchers everywhere. So far they feel they have only one solid clue. “Increases such as the ones that have been reported cannot be explained by a change in genes in such a short period,” says Giuseppina Imperatore, who leads a team of epidemiologists in the Division of Diabetes Translation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “So environmental factors are probably major players in this increase.” A Challenge of Counting Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the same underlying defect—an inability to deploy insulin in a manner that keeps blood sugar from rising too high—but they arise out of almos Continue reading >>

When Healthy Food Makes You Sick: Food Intolerances.

When Healthy Food Makes You Sick: Food Intolerances.

Allergies increasingly cause health problems. Approximately 1-2% of adults suffer from a Type I (immediate reaction) food allergy. In extreme cases these allergies can be life threatening. Type III (delayed reaction) food allergies, however, are estimated to affect up to 40% of the population. These allergies are also commonly called food intolerances or sensitivities. Type III (delayed reaction) food allergies, are estimated to affect up to 40% of the population. Allergies develop when your immune system fails to recognize a food ingredient as a nutrient and treats it instead as a foreign object. When the immune system identifies a foreign object as harmful, it will create antibodies to combat them. The antibodies that are formed in the case of Type III allergies (food intolerance) are IgG antibodies.IgG antibodies develop in your blood from continually eating the offending food. Sometimes the body reaches a threshold where it no longer tolerates that food and it is treated like an invader in your system. The body produces an inflammatory response and if we continue having the offending food we see the physical symptoms appear hours or even days after consumption. This low grade inflammation settles in all different parts of the body and can manifest itself in many different symptoms. Some people suffer gastrointestinal problems like diarrhoea, flatulence and bloating. For others it may also cause reactions of the skin such as eczema and psoriasis. Headaches as well as disorders of the joints may also be the result of food intolerance. For others still, it is the inability to lose weight even though the calorie intake has been modified. Type III food allergies can also lead to chronic diseases over time such as IBS, diabetes type 2, Chrohns disease, etc. Difference bet Continue reading >>

Link Between Male Diabetes Patients With Allergies And Kidney Disease

Link Between Male Diabetes Patients With Allergies And Kidney Disease

For men with Type 2 diabetes, the eosinophil (a cell type linked to allergic inflammation) cell count may be able to estimate the risk of diabetes-related kidney and heart disease in men. This comes from a recently published study in Japan. “Allergy is a common disease that is increasing worldwide, so our findings may have important implications for diabetic nephropathy,” comments Michiaki Fukui, MD (Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Japan). The researchers compared the eosinophil count with albumin excretion rate in nearly 800 patients with Type 2 diabetes. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that contribute to inflammation in allergic diseases. The albumin excretion rate is a key indicator of kidney disease, one of the major complications of diabetes. In men, a higher number of eosinophils in the blood correlates with higher urinealbumin — a critical early sign of diabetic kidney disease. Surprisingly, the link between eosinophil count and albumin excretion rate was even stronger than for known risk factors like high blood pressure and poor diabetes control. The eosinophil count was unrelated to albumin excretion in diabetic women. Previous studies have suggested that patients with asthma and other allergic diseases are at increased risk of heart disease. Heart disease is the main cause of death in diabetics, and nephropathy is a major risk factor for heart disease. If the results are confirmed by future studies, then the eosinophil count might help in estimating the risk of diabetes-related kidney and heart disease in men. Some of the anti-inflammatory treatments used by patients with allergies can lower the eosinophil count, and it’s possible that these treatments could also benefit male patients with diabetes, Fukui believes. He adds, “The Continue reading >>

Risk Of Allergic Conjunctivitis In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Population-based Retrospective Cohort Study

Risk Of Allergic Conjunctivitis In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Population-based Retrospective Cohort Study

Objective In accordance with the dichotomy between T helper type 1(Th1) and T helper type 2 (Th2) responses, the occurrence of allergic conjunctivitis (AC) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is, in theory, inversely related in the individual. However, recent studies investigating the association between the two diseases are controversial. Setting We used claims data of the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. Participants We identified 4160 patients aged 1–30 years with newly diagnosed T1DM and no history of AC at baseline. For each patient with T1DM, four non-T1DM controls (n=16,640) were matched by sex. The mean follow-up time was 6 years. Primary and secondary outcome measures Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk of AC. We additionally evaluated the association between risk of AC and T1DM progression by examining Diabetes Complications Severity Index (aDCSI) changes from the date of diagnosis until the end of follow-up. Results The overall incidence of allergic conjunctivitis (AC) was higher in the type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) cohort than in the control cohort (23.0 vs 13.5 per 1000 person-years, adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR): 1.59, 95% CI 1.47 to 1.71). Relative to that in patients with mildly progressive T1DM, the risk of AC increased as the adapted Diabetes Complications Severity Index (aDCSI) increased (aIRR: 1.68, 3.78 and 18.8, with yearly changes in aDCSI score: 0.51 to 1.00, 1.01 to 2.00, and >2.00 vs <0.51, respectively; for trend <0.001). Conclusion Patients with T1DM are at an elevated risk of developing AC; this risk increases with T1DM progression. The T helper type 1/T helper type 2 hypothesis is an overly simplistic explanation for this association. This is an Open Access Continue reading >>

Insulin Antibodies

Insulin Antibodies

Antibodies to exogenously delivered insulin are common with insulin treatment but are not often clinically significant. IgG antibodies are the most common while IgE antibodies are the cause of insulin allergy[10]. At high titers, IgG antibodies may limit insulin action which could delay or diminish insulin action. Rarely, antibodies can be agonists to the insulin receptor and cause hypoglycemia (usually postprandial hypoglycemia)[11]. The development of antibodies depends on the purity, molecular structure, and storage conditions of the insulin administered as well as patient factors such as age, HLA type, and delivery route[10]. Most common when patients are exposed to beef or pork insulin, rather than only to human or analog insulins[9]. Insulin auto-antibodies, in people not previously treated with insulin, are an indication of developing type 1 diabetes (See Insulin Initiation in Type 1 Diabetes and to LADA for more information). React equally to analog insulin and unmodified human insulins. Radioligand binding (RLB) assays are the most common assay used for measurement of insulin antibodies[10]. Standard immunoprecipitation and agglutination analytic methods cannot measure insulin antibodies since insulin antibody immune complexes do not precipitate[10]. High sensitivity is required for evaluating autoantibodies, which are in much lower concentration than antibodies to exogenous insulin[13]. Gel filtration chromatography can identify insulin immunocomplexes with addition of exogeneous insulin to diagnose insulin autoimmune syndrome without necessarily using radiolabelled reagants[1]. The presence of insulin antibodies does not prove that they are causing insulin resistance or hypoglycemia. More soluble insulins, such as regular and semilente are less allergenic tha Continue reading >>

Understand The Connection Between Food Allergies And Diabetes

Understand The Connection Between Food Allergies And Diabetes

(NewsTarget) Here is food for thought. Food allergies can actually cause diabetic responses complicating anti-diabetic protocols and treatments. With Diabetes Mellitus being a metabolic disorder, diabetes becomes less controllable or irreversible when other metabolic issues due to food allergies and intolerances arise. Inflammation, auto-immune destruction of cells, and insulin resistance can be triggered by food intolerances. Inflammation The necessity to trim or eliminate saturated fat from the diet has been well documented. It seems that saturated fat not only can affect good heart health, but can also trigger insulin resistance. Research conducted at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine found that saturated fats cause immune cells to activate and excrete an inflammatory protein called interleukin-1 Beta. This protein interacts with organs and tissues causing them to resist insulin. Dr. William Philpott noted that some food allergies caused body cells to swell (edema) leading to insulin resistance. Edema is a response to inflammation which contributed to diabetic type responses in the body. He and his team observed blood sugar levels of patients before and after meals. When the offending food was removed, the diabetic response vanished in conjunction with the inflammation. The offending foods were usually corn, wheat, and dairy products. Auto-Immune Destruction In some Type 1 diabetics auto-immune responses can play a key role in their diabetes. It is thought that some 75% of Type 1 diabetics are allergic to their own pancreatic cells, which are responsible for insulin production. Research conducted in Australia and Italy has found a correlation between cow's milk and Type 1 diabetes in children. Bovine Serum Albumin is a protein to which some individu Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Mast Cells And Allergic Disease

Diabetes, Mast Cells And Allergic Disease

Patients with either type I or II diabetes mellitus demonstrate unusual physiology pertaining to hypersensitivity and mast cell activation. This was first described in 1962, when a paper reported that diabetic animals do not experience anaphylactic shock. Despite the amount of time that has passed, the reasons for this are still being unraveled. The role of mast cells in type II diabetes mellitus is more straightforward. When mice are made obese through dietary manipulation, they normally develop glucose intolerance or insulin resistance. If the mice are mast cell deficient, they do not develop these conditions. Transfer of mast cells to mast cel deficient mice was shown to reverse this protection against these complications. In mice without established type Ii diabetes that were given manipulated diets to induce obesity, treatment with mast cell stabilizers actually prevented the development of type II diabetes. In mice with pre-established type II diabetes, treatment with mast cell stabilizers cromolyn or ketotifen protected against glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. These findings have been replicated in at least one patient, a type II diabetic who had normalized plasma glucose and A1C after six months on cromolyn. The relationship between mast cells and type I diabetes is far more intricate. This is mostly understood through a diabetic rat model. It is possible to induce type I diabetes in rats by administering a chemical called alloxan. Triggering diabetes in this way causes a variety of mast cell changes in these animals. The same changes can be seen when causing diabetes via administration of another chemical, streptozotocin. Diabetic rats have less vascular response to the action of histamine and reduced mast cell degranulation. These animals are resist Continue reading >>

Do Allergy Medications And Diabetes Medications Interact?

Do Allergy Medications And Diabetes Medications Interact?

I heard people with diabetes need to be careful with allergy medications. Are there allergy medications I cannot take with my diabetes medication? Zyrtec® (cetirizine), Claritin® (loratadine), Allegra® (fexofenadine), and Benadryl® (diphenhydramine) are all allergy medications that should not affect your blood sugar when used by themselves. However, these antihistamines are often paired with pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine are both decongestants. These two medications can cause an increase in blood sugar when taken with diabetes medication and should be avoided, if possible, in people with diabetes. Be sure to read labels on cold and allergy medications, and be careful when the letter D is added to a medication name, such as Zyrtec-D or Claritin-D. This means that it contains pseudoephedrine. Continue reading >>

Common Skin Conditions For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Common Skin Conditions For People With Type 2 Diabetes

People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing skin problems, or from complications of skin problems that have not been spotted soon enough, often because of reduced skin sensation. Most skin conditions can be prevented and successfully treated if caught early. However, if not cared for properly, a minor skin condition in a person with diabetes can turn into a serious problem with potentially severe consequences. Skin conditions linked to diabetes Scleroderma diabeticorum: This condition causes a thickening of the skin on the back of the neck and upper back. This condition is rare but can affect people with type 2 diabetes. The treatment involves bringing your blood glucose level under control. Lotions and moisturisers may help soften the skin. Diabetic dermopathy: Also called shin spots, this condition develops as a result of changes to the blood vessels that supply the skin. Dermopathy appears as a shiny round or oval lesion of thin skin over the front lower parts of the lower legs. The patches do not hurt, although rarely they can be itchy or cause burning. Treatment is usually not necessary. Diabetic blisters (bullosis diabeticorum): In rare cases, people with diabetes develop blisters that resemble burn blisters. These blisters can occur on the fingers, hands, toes, feet, legs or forearms. Diabetic blisters are usually painless and heal on their own. They often occur in people who have severe diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. Bringing your blood glucose level under control is the treatment for this condition. Disseminated granuloma annulare: This condition causes sharply defined, ring or arc-shaped areas on the skin. These rashes most often occur on the fingers and ears, but they can occur on the chest and abdomen. The rash can be red, red-brown or ski Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

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