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Type 1 Diabetes Treatments

Immunotherapy Treatment Shown Safe In Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial

Immunotherapy Treatment Shown Safe In Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trial

A small clinical trial showed an immune system therapy was safe for people with type 1 diabetes, British researchers report. The immunotherapy also showed signs of helping to keep insulin production steady in people newly diagnosed with the disease, the study authors said. However, because this was a placebo-controlled safety trial, there weren't enough people included to know for sure how well the treatment works. The therapy is similar to an allergy shot in the way it works, the researchers explained. "Type 1 diabetes comes about when the immune system inadvertently and irreparably damages beta cells that make insulin," said one of the study's authors, Dr. Mark Peakman. He's a professor of clinical immunology at King's College London in England. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone that helps usher the sugar from foods into the body's cells to be used as energy. If the immune system continues to attack the beta cells, which are found in the pancreas, a person with type 1 diabetes will no longer make enough insulin to meet the body's needs. It's at this point that they must take insulin injections or use an insulin pump to replace the lost insulin. Peakman and his colleagues are trying to stop the attacks on the beta cells. "We have learned that immune attacks like this can be suppressed by immune cells called T-regs (regulatory T cells)," Peakman said. When people develop type 1 diabetes, it's likely that they don't have enough of the right type of T-regs or those T-regs aren't working very well. So, the investigators developed a type of treatment called peptide immunotherapy using disease-related autoantigens. Autoantigens are the substances that cause an autoimmune attack, but it's not clear which ones are responsible for a person's diabetes, according to Simi A Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes: Synopsis Of The 2017 American Diabetes Association Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes Free

Abstract Description: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) annually updates Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes to provide clinicians, patients, researchers, payers, and other interested parties with evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. Methods: For the 2017 Standards of Care, the ADA Professional Practice Committee did MEDLINE searches from 1 January 2016 to November 2016 to add, clarify, or revise recommendations on the basis of new evidence. The committee rated the recommendations as A, B, or C, depending on the quality of evidence, or E for expert consensus or clinical experience. The Standards of Care were reviewed and approved by the Executive Committee of the ADA Board of Directors, which includes health care professionals, scientists, and laypersons. Feedback from the larger clinical community informed revisions. Recommendation: This synopsis focuses on recommendations from the 2017 Standards of Care about monitoring and pharmacologic approaches to glycemic management for type 1 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) first released its practice guidelines for health professionals in 1989. The Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes have since provided an extensive set of evidence-based recommendations that are updated annually for the diagnosis and management of patients with diabetes. The 2017 Standards of Care cover all aspects of patient care (1); this guideline synopsis focuses on monitoring and pharmacologic approaches for patients with type 1 diabetes. Guideline Development and Evidence Grading Monitoring Glycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Glycemic Goals: Recommendations Pharmacologic Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes: Recommendations Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) require lifelong insulin therapy. Most require 2 or more injections of insulin daily, with doses adjusted on the basis of self-monitoring of blood glucose levels. Long-term management requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes physicians, nurses, dietitians, and selected specialists. In some patients, the onset of type 1 DM is marked by an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) but is followed by a symptom-free “honeymoon period” in which the symptoms remit and the patient requires little or no insulin. This remission is caused by a partial return of endogenous insulin secretion, and it may last for several weeks or months (sometimes for as long as 1-2 years). Ultimately, however, the disease recurs, and patients require insulin therapy. Often, the patient with new-onset type 1 DM who presents with mild manifestations and who is judged to be compliant can begin insulin therapy as an outpatient. However, this approach requires close follow-up and the ability to provide immediate and thorough education about the use of insulin; the signs, symptoms, and treatment of hypoglycemia; and the need to self-monitor blood glucose levels. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends using patient age as one consideration in the establishment of glycemic goals, with targets for preprandial, bedtime/overnight, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. [5] In 2014, the ADA released a position statement on the diagnosis and management of type 1 diabetes in all age groups. The statement includes a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c of less than 7.5% across all pediatric age groups, replacing earlier guidelines that specified different glycemic control targets by age. The adult HbA1c target of les Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

Diabetes is not just one condition - but whether your body is struggling with blood sugar levels due to type 1, or type 2, or even only during pregnancy, it's a serious condition that requires daily care and still doesn't have a cure. But scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Brand new beta cells. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. 2. A preventative vaccine. Finnish researchers are about to embark on the first-ever clinical trial for a type 1 diabetes prevention vaccine. While it's not a cure for those who already have the condition, a successful vaccine could potentially prevent thousands of cases each year, as the vaccine targets a virus linked with the development of an autoimmune reaction in the pancreas. 3. A unique transplant. One woman with severe type 1 diabetes has spent a year without insulin injections thanks to an experimental transplant. Doctors implanted insulin-producing cells into a fatty membrane in the stomach cavity, and the success of the operation is paving the way towards more people receiving artificial pancreases. 4. New pancreas tissue. Earlier this year scientists announced that they reversed type 1 diabetes in mice by giving them a transplant of pancreatic tissue. The tissue was grown using stem cells from non-diabetic mice, and the success of this method suggests i Continue reading >>

How Long Can A Person With Type 1 Diabetes Live With No Treatment?

How Long Can A Person With Type 1 Diabetes Live With No Treatment?

This will depend a great deal on two things: Is the person still in the honeymoon period? A person who is newly diabetic usually retains some insulin production. This can last for months or even years. Is the person aware that they are out of insulin? There are methods for mitigating (a little) the lack of insulin if one is aware of it. If a person is a long term diabetic with 0 insulin production and they are unaware that they are out of insulin so they continue to eat and drink like normal, they can fall into DKA (diabetic keto-acidosis) within 24 hours and without treatment death is likely within a few days. If said person still has SOME insulin production, then as soon as they stop consuming more carbs than their body can deal with, their situation may stabilize and while death is still likely, it can take months, or even a year or two. If a person has 0 insulin production and is AWARE of the lack of insulin, they will immediately stop consuming carbohydrates and begin drinking water in copious quantities. They will also begin exercising. Exercising will help reduce blood sugar to some extent, and drinking lots of fluids can help flush the ketones that cause DKA out. The person won’t be able to stave off death forever, but they will extend the amount of time it takes to fall into DKA and then die; but even then, you are probably talking about a matter of a week or three. If the person is in the honeymoon phase and still producing 10% or 20% of a normal person’s insulin, they may well be able to survive for years by radically reducing their carbohydrate intake and exercising regularly. But as their production of insulin drops, they will gradually have greater and greater problems until they too die. Continue reading >>

Doctors Baffled By

Doctors Baffled By "a1c Reversal"

(Washington, DC) Millions of Diabetics have found a simple way to reverse their Diabetes. Because of a scientific discovery in Asia, doctors have found out how to lower A1c and Blood Glucose levels without the need for expensive medications. Think Diabetes will last forever? Think again.After the Chief of The Vedda tribe, Lakmal, shared the knowledge of his people, Michael Dempsey was able to save his wife after she had fallen into a diabetic coma. Michael is now sharing the "secret" to getting rid of Diabetes for good, so that he can help people before they suffer from the same condition that almost took love of his life. This information is not to be taken lightly, as this life-changing program is designed to help anyone, regardless of how bad their Diabetes is. Michael reversed his wife's diabetes by doing this daily: After scientists from the world-renowned Pancreatic Research Facility in the U.K. discovered that the "Vedda Tribe" had no recorded cases of Diabetes ever, they knew they had to share these miraculous findings. This ground-breaking video has taken the Diabetic world by storm. [WatchVideo] Continue reading >>

Omega-3s May Help To Treat Type 1 Diabetes

Omega-3s May Help To Treat Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an incurable autoimmune disorder of unknown origin. New research, however, may pave the way for novel, more efficient therapies for type 1 diabetes, as omega-3 fatty acids are found to reduce the autoimmune responses typical of the disease. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that affects approximately 1.25 million adults and children in the United States. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system does not recognize its own beta cells, so it attacks and destroys them. Beta cells are responsible for creating insulin. The body needs insulin to transport glucose into cells, where it is needed for producing energy. Without insulin-producing beta cells, the glucose builds up in the blood stream, and the body cannot use it for energy. It is not yet known what causes type 1 diabetes, and there is currently no cure for the illness. The most common treatment option is administering insulin, but the ultimate goal of the medical research community is to stop the body's immune system from attacking its own beta cells, or reversing this process. New research, published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, investigates the benefits of adding omega-3 fatty acids to the diet of mice with type 1 diabetes. Omega-3s are a class of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). They are typically found in fish, seafood, and some vegetable oils, as well as in dietary supplements. These fatty acids are important for the good functioning of several organs, as these beneficial fats improve the activity of muscles, prevent blood clotting, help digestion, and aid the division and growth of cells. The health benefits of omega-3s have been investigated in several studies. Some research has suggested that omega-3s protect against cardiovascular events and rheumatoid arthritis Continue reading >>

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

Diabetes is a condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose (or sugar) in the body. This happens when your body can’t make or use insulin like it’s supposed to. Insulin is a substance that helps your body use the sugar from the food you eat. There are two different types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. People with both types of diabetes need medications to help keep their blood sugar levels normal. The types of drugs that can treat you depend on the type of diabetes you have. This article gives you information about drugs that treat both types of diabetes to help give you an idea of the treatment options available to you. Insulin Insulin is the most common type of medication used in type 1 diabetes treatment. It’s also used in type 2 diabetes treatment. It’s given by injection and comes in different types. The type of insulin you need depends on how severe your insulin depletion is. Options include: Short-acting insulin regular insulin (Humulin and Novolin) Rapid-acting insulins Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulins Combination insulins NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine-insulin aspart) Humalog Mix 75/25 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humalog Mix 50/50 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humulin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Novolin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Ryzodeg (insulin degludec-insulin aspart) Amylinomimetic drug Pramlintide (SymlinPen 120, SymlinPen 60) is an amylinomimetic drug. It’s an injectable drug used before meals. It works by delaying the time your stomach takes to empty itself. It reduces glucagon secretion after meals. This lowers your blood sugar. It also reduces appetite through a central mechanism. Most medications for type 2 diabetes are o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Treatment (type 1 And Type 2 Medications And Diet)

Diabetes Treatment (type 1 And Type 2 Medications And Diet)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 treatment facts Controlling blood sugar (glucose) levels is the major goal of diabetes treatment, in order to prevent complications of the disease. Type 2 diabetes may be managed with non-insulin medications, insulin, weight reduction, or dietary changes. The choice of medications for type 2 diabetes is individualized, taking into account: the effectiveness and side effect profile of each medication, the patient's underlying health status, any medication compliance issues, and cost to the patient or health-care system. Medications for type 2 diabetes can work in different ways to reduce blood glucose levels. They may: increase insulin sensitivity, increase glucose excretion, decrease absorption of carbohydrates from the digestive tract, or work through other mechanisms. Medications for type 2 diabetes are often used in combination. Proper nutrition is a part of any diabetes care plan. There is no one specific "diabetic diet" that is recommended for all individuals. Pancreas transplantation is an area of active study for the treatment of diabetes. What is the treatment for diabetes? The major goal in treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes is to control blood sugar (glucose) levels within the normal range, with minimal excursions to low or high levels. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is treated: Oral medications are prescribed when these measures fail to control the elevated blood sugars of type 2 diabetes. If oral medications become ineffective treatment with insulin is initiated. Adherence to a diabetic diet is a critical aspect of controlling blood sugar in people with diabetes. When considering an ideal diabetic diet, a number of factors must be taken into consideration, including the amount and type of carbohydrates consumed as well as the amount of fib Continue reading >>

Will There Ever Be A Cure For Diabetes? Why Or Why Not?

Will There Ever Be A Cure For Diabetes? Why Or Why Not?

For More tips,read more about diabetes Diabetes Full Control- Live a Better Life What is type 1 diabetes? Around 400,000 people in Germany are producing cells of the pancreas and destroys them. As a result, it comes within a few days to weeks for lack of insulin production. Type 1 diabetes often occurs as early as childhood and adolescence. The hormone insulin is responsible for the locks of dietary sugar from the blood into the cells that need it for energy. In insulin deficiency, the glucose in the blood accumulates - the blood sugar level rises. This can damage permanently the blood vessels, nerves and numerous organs. Patients with type 1 diabetes need throughout their lives several times daily insulin injections to prevent acute metabolic disorders and related diseases due to high blood sugar levels. What is the difference between Type 1 diabetes and Type 2? In contrast to type 1 diabetes is the type 2 diabetes, below the estimated about seven million people in Germany suffer, not the consequence of a lack of insulin, but an insulin resistance. This means that the cells no longer speak adequately to insulin, so that the hormone can not smuggle the sugar into the cells. The blood sugar level rises. To compensate, the pancreas initially produces larger amounts of insulin. Also no longer sufficient to overcome the insulin resistance, a type 2 diabetes develops. The main causes of type 2 diabetes are genetic predisposition, obesity and lack of exercise. While the type 1 diabetes is more likely in recent years, a type 2 diabetes often develops at an advanced age in patients. Training: What to know patients Typically, a person with Type 1 diabetes leads his therapy in everyday life through their own, as long as no problems or complaints arise. In children take parents th Continue reading >>

10 Big Deals In Type 1 Treatment In 2015

10 Big Deals In Type 1 Treatment In 2015

We run down our picks for the biggest news stories in diabetes research and treatment. If a good time existed to have Type 1 diabetes, this would be it. In 2015, Type 1 treatments that once seemed far-fetched have taken major steps forward. We’ve seen continued commercialization of pump technology based on artificial pancreas algorithms, good news on the future of stem cell treatments and beta cell transplants, expansion in treatment options, and real competition among insulin manufacturers. Here, in no particular order, are our picks for the 10 biggest events of Type 1 diabetes treatment in 2015: Medtronic releases the MiniMed 640G pump internationally, the first commercially available pump that uses predictive algorithms to anticipate lows and stop insulin delivery to ward those lows off. The pump’s release was exciting enough for the non-diabetes press to breathlessly declare the 640G an artificial pancreas. Not quite, but thanks for playing. Of course, the 640G isn’t available yet in the U.S (Thanks, FDA). Of course, there already was a software glitch that caused inaccurate readings for some international pump users (Flipside – Thanks, FDA). Medtronic executives seem to be eager to quicken their artificial pump research and development. That may be because…. Bigfoot Biomedical became the first company created from the #WeAreNotWaiting movement. Last year, Bryan Mazlish came out as the mythical Bigfoot, a dad who hacked together a non-closed-loop artificial pancreas system at home. This year, he, former JDRF CEO Jeffrey Brewer and others created Bigfoot Biomedical to commercialize that system. Then they went one step further and bought out the physical remnants of the defunct Asante company (RIP – Snap pump), showing they meant business. Of course, the d Continue reading >>

A Quest: Insulin-releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

A Quest: Insulin-releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

Scientists in California think they may have found a way to transplant insulin-producing cells into diabetic patients who lack those cells — and protect the little insulin-producers from immune rejection. Their system, one of several promising approaches under development, hasn't yet been tested in people. But if it works, it could make living with diabetes much less of a burden. For now, patients with Type-1 diabetes have to regularly test their blood sugar levels, and inject themselves with insulin when it's needed. Some researchers are developing machines to automate that process. But Crystal Nyitray, founder and CEO of the biotechnology startup Encellin, in San Francisco, didn't want to use a machine to treat diabetes. As a graduate student in bioengineering at the University of California, San Francisco a few years ago, Nyitray wanted to try something different: living cells. "Cells are the ultimate smart machine," she says. Clinical trials that transplant insulin-making pancreatic cells into people with diabetes have been underway for several years, with some success. But the recipient's immune system is hard on these transplanted cells, and most patients still need insulin injections eventually. Nyitray and colleagues designed a system that would encase live islet cells from the pancreas in a flexible membrane that could be implanted under the skin. Insulin and blood sugar could pass through the membrane, but cells from the recipient's immune system would be kept out, preventing immune rejection. "I think of it like if you're sitting in a house and you have the window open with a screen," Nyitray says. "So you can feel the breeze of the air outside, and smell everything, but the bugs and the flies aren't able to get through because you have the screen in place. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Occurs when the body's immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. Type 1 diabetes develops most often in young people but can appear in adults. PubMed Health Glossary (Source: NIH - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) About Type 1 Diabetes Diabetes is a metabolic disease that affects many different parts of the body. Depending on the type of diabetes, the body either cannot produce insulin itself (Type 1) or is unable to use the insulin it produces properly (Type 2). Insulin is a hormone, a chemical messenger that is transported in the blood and regulates important body functions. Without insulin your body cannot get the energy it needs from the food you have eaten. This vital hormone is usually produced in the pancreas and released into the bloodstream. Here it enables the sugar (glucose) in our food and drink to be transported into our cells and converted into energy for our bodies. Without insulin our bodies cannot use the sugar in our blood, so the sugar builds up there. Very high blood sugar concentrations cause a number of symptoms. In people who have type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce any insulin, or only produces very little insulin. This means they have to inject insulin every day to get the insulin they are lacking. Insulin therapy prevents dangerous fluctuations in blood sugar levels and protects people with diabetes from the effects of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. And good treatment can help to prevent the development of complications that can arise if your blood sugar levels are too high... Read more about Type 1 Diabetes There are increasing numbers of people living with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The main aim of treatme Continue reading >>

The Newest Type 1 Diabetes Treatments

The Newest Type 1 Diabetes Treatments

Recent innovations may reduce the round-the-clock job of managing type 1 diabetes in children. If a child has type 1 diabetes (T1D), his immune system attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, the hormone that converts food into energy. Before the 1920s, the diagnosis of T1D was a death sentence. In less than a century, technology has developed so greatly that not only can the 15,000 kids diagnosed annually with T1D in the U.S. survive, with careful management, they can also thrive and live long, productive, happy lives. Constant monitoring Without enough insulin, blood glucose (sugar) levels will rise to dangerous amounts, and over time, this can cause devastating long-term complications such as kidney failure, heart disease, lower-limb amputations, and blindness in adults. It's essential for kids with T1D to have their blood sugar levels checked around the clock. Six or more times a day, parents prick the child's fingertip for a drop of blood and place it on a special test strip in a blood glucose meter. With that reading, a child then takes insulin, eats, or modifies activity to help keep the blood sugar at a normal level. But T1D management is changing, even as you read this story. "The progress of new technologies is rapid and ongoing," says Parents advisor Lori Laffel, M.D., M.P.H., chief of the Pediatric, Adolescent, and Young Adult Section at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. "Diabetes discoveries are moving at revolutionary speed." Current treatment A child with T1D must inject insulin many times a day or use an insulin pump, which delivers the insulin through a tube connected to the child's abdomen. The exact number of injections varies from kid to kid, but a child typically needs one before meals or whenever she eats, or when her bl Continue reading >>

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