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Type 1 Diabetes Tips And Tricks

10 Tips For Families New To Type 1 Diabetes

10 Tips For Families New To Type 1 Diabetes

10 Tips for Families New to Type 1 Diabetes in: Diseases & Conditions , Endocrinology A diabetes diagnosis can be scary. Learning about the condition, its management, and medications such as insulin can be overwhelming. Parents and kids facing a new diagnosis of type 1 diabetes are beginning a long-term period of learning basic and then more complex points of diabetes management. If you or someone you love has been recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, it will take some time to adjust to a new lifestyle. As a pediatric endocrinologist, Ive been working with kids with diabetes for over 25 years. If I had to pick my top 10 tips that I believe could help all newly diagnosed families, I would offer this advice: 1. Life with diabetes is manageable. You will need to pay more attention to detail, and it will be a hassle to maintain good diabetes control, but your diabetes care team will give you the information you need to manage every aspect of your condition. Read everything you can get your hands on and soon you will be a pro. 2. You will not have diabetes for the rest of your life. Research is progressing at a fantastic pace. First we will have better ways of treating diabetes, but eventually (but hard to predict precisely when) there will be a cure. Your goal should be to take excellent care of diabetes so that, when the cure arrives, your body will be in excellent condition to receive it. 3. Get to know and feel comfortable with your health care team. Their goal is to teach you to manage diabetes at home, at school and at work. You must manage diabetes 24/7, but you spend relatively little time with the diabetes team. Make the most of your clinic visits and dont be hesitant to call or message your doctor, nurse practitioner, diabetes educator, social worker or dietit Continue reading >>

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

10 Diet And Exercise Tricks To Control Diabetes

Small goals make a big difference When it comes to type 2 diabetes, you need diet and exercise goals that encourage you to succeed—not ones that set you up to fail, says Ann Goebel-Fabbri, PhD, a psychologist and investigator at the Joslin Diabetes Center, in Boston. "I think goals have to be small and well spelled out for people. Everyone has the experience of going to a health practitioner and being told something vague: 'You know, you really ought to lose weight.' What does that mean? Goals need to be broken down into small nuts and bolts," she says. First step: See where you stand now Margaret Savoca, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, suggests that you stop and look at your eating and exercise habits, and figure out what will be the easiest changes to make, rather than making huge changes that are tough to sustain. "Diabetes is a marathon, not a sprint," says Elizabeth Hardy, 47, a Dallas resident who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2005. For Hardy it was easiest to make changes in her life one step at a time. Here are 10 ways to start. Bring your own lunch Avoid eating lunch at restaurants or fast-food joints. Restaurant meals "can go out of control easily," Savoca says. They tend to have large portions, lots of calories, and high amounts of fat. Research has found an association between eating out more and having a higher body weight. When you make your own lunch, you control the ingredients and your portion sizes. If making your own lunch every day is too much, you might want to try twice a week to start. Use a pedometer These handy devices—available for less than $20 at sporting goods stores—clip on to your waistband and record the number of steps you take. Use one to estimat Continue reading >>

Halloween With Type 1 Diabetes: Tips For Parents

Halloween With Type 1 Diabetes: Tips For Parents

Halloween with Type 1 Diabetes: Tips for Parents Living with type 1 diabetes at any age has its challenges, but for kiddos there are so big and little moments of life that can be extra challenging to work around. Halloween is definitely one of those moments. How do you handle a holiday that revolves entirely around candy with a type 1 kiddo? We called upon a few of the many awesome diabetes-parents advocates we know from their work and outspoken voices of support in the DOC (diabetes online community) to hear how theyve approached Halloween with their type 1 kiddos: How do you handle Halloween with kids who have type 1 diabetes? Since Lauren had diabetes back in the days of NPH and Regular insulins, we did have to be creative. But it brought us an idea that stuck: even when pumps came in and she could eat whatever, whenever. We told her she could keep any candy she wanted for future treats, but she could trade in any she wanted at a rate of 10 cents per piece. Well, our neighbors got word and STUFFED her collection bag with candy each year! The kid made out big . and a tradition began. Both our kids ended up doing it, diabetes or not! Candy bought back was donated to the troops, btw, via a local dentist who does that. Moira McCarthy-Stanford is a d-parent, blogger at DespiteDiabetes , and author of: Raising Teens with Type 1 Diabetes , The Everything Parents Guide to Children with Juvenile Diabetes , and The Everything Guide to Cooking for Children with Diabetes . Ideally, it all depends on how long your child has had diabetes. If you are new to diabetes, then just take it like everything else. If they have a snack, then compensate. We are so far removed fro the mountain of candy that comes every year that we just put it in the cookie jar and it will last for a good mo Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

4 Steps To Manage Your Diabetes For Life

This publication has been reviewed by NDEP for plain language principles. Learn more about our review process. Actions you can take The marks in this booklet show actions you can take to manage your diabetes. Help your health care team make a diabetes care plan that will work for you. Learn to make wise choices for your diabetes care each day. Step 1: Learn about diabetes. What is diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes – Your body does not make insulin. This is a problem because you need insulin to take the sugar (glucose) from the foods you eat and turn it into energy for your body. You need to take insulin every day to live. Type 2 diabetes – Your body does not make or use insulin well. You may need to take pills or insulin to help control your diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational (jest-TAY-shun-al) diabetes – Some women get this kind of diabetes when they are pregnant. Most of the time, it goes away after the baby is born. But even if it goes away, these women and their children have a greater chance of getting diabetes later in life. You are the most important member of your health care team. You are the one who manages your diabetes day by day. Talk to your doctor about how you can best care for your diabetes to stay healthy. Some others who can help are: dentist diabetes doctor diabetes educator dietitian eye doctor foot doctor friends and family mental health counselor nurse nurse practitioner pharmacist social worker How to learn more about diabetes. Take classes to learn more about living with diabetes. To find a class, check with your health care team, hospital, or area health clinic. You can also search online. Join a support group — in-person or online — to get peer support with managing your Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding Can Help You Manage Type 1 Diabetes!

Bodybuilding Can Help You Manage Type 1 Diabetes!

Bodybuilding Can Help You Manage Type 1 Diabetes! You can't prevent type 1 diabetes but you can lead a healthy life and minimize your chances of developing the myriad complications that are associated with diabetes. Bodybuilding can help you do this. As a bodybuilder you will improve you ability to watch your food intake. Exercise increases the effect of insulin moving sugar from the blood. Be careful. High blood sugar can weaken your immune system. Type 1 diabetes typically develops in childhood though there are cases where adults develop this disease. You can't prevent type 1 diabetes but you can lead a healthy life and minimize your chances of developing the myriad complications that are associated with diabetes. Bodybuilding can help you do this. Type 1 diabetes develops when your pancreas produces very little or no insulin in response to increases in blood sugar after eating. Insulin is an anabolic hormone that helps carry sugar from your bloodstream to your body's cells for use as energy. With type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. As blood sugar builds up with no place to go, supplemental insulin is necessary to carry this sugar to your body's cells. All of these symptoms result from high blood sugar and/or a lack of energy from cells deprived of sugar. There are a few short-term complications and several long-term complications that may arise in someone with type 1 diabetes. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) - symptoms include: Bodybuilding Can Help You Manage Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is all about managing your blood sugar levels within normal limits by regulating your insulin doses to match your carbohydrate intake. The better you regulate your blood sugar and stay healthy, the less likely you are to suffe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

The Risks of Treating Diabetes with Drugs Are FAR Worse than the Disease There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes arent aware of their circumstances, either. The latest diabetes statistics 1 echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic . Whats hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health. Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes dubbed juvenile onset diabetes is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure. Whats most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes - Top Food Tips To Beat Disease | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

What To Eat With Diabetes - Top Food Tips To Beat Disease | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Understanding the food we eat is key to winning the fight against diabetes Up until a few generations ago, Type 2 diabetes was something of a rarity. Now, it has got to crisis point, placing an enormous burden on the NHS. Im not casting stones, but in the vast majority of cases, it is due to poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle. Unfortunately, knowledge about nutrition is very poor in this country which is partly why we are in the situation we are in, yet a little knowledge can be life-changing. That is why I have created a new type of nutrition school called the Sano School of Culinary Medicine, where anyone can learn how to use food as medicine and how to apply nutritional science in a practical way. Increase your intake of the all-important omega-3 fatty acids Now, Im not saying you should go and start on the Atkins diet (although that may not be that bad an idea for some people), but understanding what carbohydrates to choose and how much is of vital importance. The number one thing to do is ditch the white stuff; white bread, white rice and white pasta. These refined varieties have the fibre removed so take little time to digest. This means they will liberate their sugar content rapidly, and that our blood sugar levels will rise aggressively, causing the large blood-sugar spikes we want to avoid. The multigrain varieties keep their fibre content. This means they take longer to digest and liberate their sugar content much more slowly, drip-feeding blood sugar rather than carpet bombing it. You also need to understand how important portion control is with carbs. The simple guideline I give to people is to cut your usual portions in half. If you have rice with meals, half your usual portion (as well as choosing brown). If you are having a sandwich, try an open variety Continue reading >>

Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas does not produce any insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body to control the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. Without insulin, glucose builds up in your blood instead of being used for energy. Your body produces glucose and also gets glucose from foods like bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, milk and fruit. The cause of type 1 diabetes remains unknown. It is not caused by eating too much sugar, and is not preventable. The current thought is that type 1 diabetes occurs when the body’s immune system destroys the cells that make insulin. Insulin therapy Insulin therapy is required for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. There are a variety of insulins available to help manage diabetes. Insulin is injected by pen, syringe or pump. Your doctor will work with you to determine: The number of insulin injections you need per day The timing of your insulin injections The dose of insulin you need with each injection The insulin treatment your doctor prescribes will depend on your goals, age, lifestyle, meal plan, general health and motivation. Social and financial factors may also need to be considered. The good news You can live a long and healthy life by keeping your blood glucose (sugar) levels in the target range set by you and your health-care provider: You can do this by: Taking insulin as recommended (and other medications, if prescribed by your doctor) Monitoring your blood glucose (sugar) levels regularly using a home blood glucose meter* Eating healthy meals and snacks Enjoying regular physical activity Aiming for a healthy body weight Managing stress effectively * Discuss with your health-care provider how often you should measure your blood glucose (sugar) level. Who can help you? Your health-care team is t Continue reading >>

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by JDRF Millions of people around the world live with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a life-threatening autoimmune disease that strikes both children and adults. JDRF is the leading global organization funding research that will one day create a world without T1D. By joining JDRF Kids Walk, not only can your students make a difference for those living with T1D, but it’s fun and easy for everyone involved! Find out how your school can help today. As an educator, you provide an extremely important set of eyes and ears for students. Since you see them throughout the day, you notice when things are different, off or just not quite right. This is incredibly helpful and comforting to parents because teachers often uncover important and even life-changing discoveries. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of those diseases that teachers can often see signs of in the classroom, so it’s important to know what to look for. Take a look at some of these warning signs, and also get tips about how to accommodate a child with T1D in your classroom. 1. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is not related to lifestyle, nor is it the result of anything the child (or family) did or did not do. Normally, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that helps the body use glucose (“blood sugar”) for energy. In people who have T1D, the body’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells and the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, so blood sugar levels can rise if unchecked. A person with T1D needs insulin injections or infusions to live. 2. Excessive urination, thirst and hunger are all symptoms of T1D. Because teachers spend so much time with kids, they may be among the first to notice symptoms that could be linked to diabetes. A child who is asking to use the bath Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Tips And Tricks: 8 Must-have Resources For Families

Type 1 Diabetes Tips And Tricks: 8 Must-have Resources For Families

After my child was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes last year, I was shocked, devastated, frightened, angry and overwhelmed and desperately searched for Type 1 diabetes tips and tricks. Even though one of my best friends had diabetes when I was growing up and I knew what a low blood sugar was, I truly had no idea this disease was so complicated. Since I had a reporting and health-writing background, I immersed myself in research as a way to gain control over the situation. I also joined online support groups and learned a lot from the wonderful parents who had been in the “diabetes trenches” for much longer and were so generous about sharing their experiences. Thankfully, I found some products and resources that have made our lives so much easier. In honor of National Diabetes Month in November, I am listing them below. Here is the list I wish someone had handed me in the hospital. Most of the resources will be helpful for adults with type 1 diabetes in addition to children. 1. Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitor – We ordered the Dexcom a few months after diagnosis upon hearing glowing endorsements from parents. The Dexcom shows a new glucose reading every 5 minutes for up to seven days of uninterrupted wear-time to show where glucose levels are, where they have been and where they are going. Although you still need to take finger stick tests, boy, does it give you a lot more information! You’ll see an approximation of what the blood sugar number is along with arrows telling whether the blood sugar is steady or dropping, rising and how fast. Even better, an alarm will give you a heads-up about lows and highs which is especially great at night, when a child is in school, or playing sports. Sometimes it acts almost like a crystal ball, giving forewarning about a low b Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children?

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 1 Diabetes In Children?

Type 1 Diabetes in Children: Symptoms, Causes & Management Often referred to as juvenile diabetes, type 1 diabetes in children is a very critical condition if no serious actions are taken to manage the symptoms. Managing diabetes at an early age requires difficult and careful regimens, which young children usually dislike. Diabetic children may feel a little emotionally left out because of their condition. However, with proper diagnosis, treatment protocol and emotional support, both parents and children may live a normal happy life. Listed below are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes: Symptom Description Increased urination and thirst Due to elevated blood sugar levels, the fluid present within the tissues is pulled out, so the child may feel thirsty. This will enhance the thirst, followed by high water intake and more frequent urination. Feeling excessively hungry Organs and muscles are also deprived of energy due to insufficient insulin in the body, which affects the normal tissue uptake of sugar in cells. All these factors can lead to excessive hunger and food intake. Weight loss Even when your child is consuming high proportion of calories, he may still lose some weight mainly because of poor energy levels. In the early stages of diabetes, a lot of people tend to lose significant weight due to fat redistribution. Fatigue Lethargy and tiredness are common symptoms as the cells are unable to get enough sugar. Irritability If the condition remains undiagnosed, your child may appear irritable with twitchy mood swings. Blurred vision Elevated blood sugar levels lead to abnormal fluid movement across the lens and other tissues of the body, which leads to blurred vision. Yeast infection Girls who are with type 1 diabetes may be affected by genital yeast infection. This infec Continue reading >>

Your Child Can Live An Active Life With Type 1 Diabetes

Your Child Can Live An Active Life With Type 1 Diabetes

Editor’s note: This article was originally published on Apr 15, 2015. When Kristen’s parents were given the diagnosis that their daughter, about to turn 4, had Type 1 Diabetes, they were overwhelmed with questions. What is this disease? How can we keep her healthy and safe? Will Kristen be able to maintain a lifestyle similar to other children? With the help of a diabetes team (including a nutritionist and doctors), Kristen is now 10-years-old and is one of the most outgoing and active children I know. She swims, plays on her school basketball and volleyball teams, and she participates in gymnastics, cheerleading, and horse jumping. She has also met many other children with diabetes through attending diabetes camp, which has helped normalize the disease for her. Kristen is so comfortable with her condition that not only does she speak openly with her classmates about diabetes but they accompany her when she tests her blood sugar levels and takes her insulin. According to the Canadian Diabetes Association, Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a disease in which the pancreas does not produce any insulin, a hormone that helps your body to control the level of glucose (sugar) in your blood. Without insulin, glucose builds up in your blood instead of being used for energy. Being active is an important component in anyone’s life, but for those with T1D exercise is important in maintaining cardiovascular health and lowering blood glucose levels. Missy Foy is an elite marathon runner who has been ranked in the top 10 in the world at the 80 kms distance Being active with T1D, though, comes with unique challenges. But having T1D does not mean your child’s active lifestyle cannot lead to great sporting success (see sidebar above for successful athletes living with T1D). Marian Flanner Continue reading >>

Running With Diabetes: How To Carry All Your Stuff Around

Running With Diabetes: How To Carry All Your Stuff Around

Hi everyone! I’m back with my second blog for tips and tricks on running with diabetes. Part 1 is here. Diabetes is a very stuff-intensive condition. When you acquire it, you are automatically granted access to a treasure chest of doohickies unbeknownst to mere mortals. There’s your insulin, which comes in vials, cartridges, or pre-filled pens. Then you have your syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and other devices to administer insulin to your body through some form of injection. For that you need, of course, a supply of sterile needles. Then there’s your blood glucose meter, which needs test strips that come in another vial, and a lancing device (lovingly referred to in my house as “the holenizer”) for drawing blood from your finger for glucose testing, which of course needs a fresh lancet for every use. Finally there is your list of random, but necessary things like alcohol swabs, pump tubes, dextrose tablets. To diabetics, carrying all this junk around is as vital as it is unpractical on any given day. On race day, the junk simultaneously becomes totally unpractical and exremely vital. You don’t want to carry it around, but you have absolutely no other option. The only thing left to do is make the best of a bad situation, and this is a quest I have been on ever since I started running. And now you get the benefit of all that experience. Lucky you. The golden rule for carrying stuff So, if you are a diabetic, and you wonder what to do with all your stuff while training or running a race, here are my golden rules for carrying stuff, based on years of experience: Carry as little as you can. Integration is beautiful. Technology is your friend. Below, I will explain how I applied these rules. That means inevitaby that I will be mentioning particular produ Continue reading >>

How To Manage Type 1 Diabetes In A Healthy Way

How To Manage Type 1 Diabetes In A Healthy Way

Hiya Gorgeous, One of my biggest priorities is to help readers with chronic health issues thrive. And, a challenge that many of my readers (or the people they love) face is diabetes. So, last week we focused on type 2 diabetes and this week we’re shining a light on type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is something my team and I often talk about behind-the-scenes. That’s because our Crazy Sexy Dietitian, Jen Reilly, is mom to a very special young man with this health challenge. Her son, Jake, was diagnosed at age two. Whereas type 2 diabetes is often the result of insulin resistance and can sometimes be reversed with weight loss, exercise and a healthy diet, type 1 diabetes is the result of an autoimmune response where the body attacks and kills the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Unfortunately, it can’t be reversed. Learn how technology, planning, prepping & high-protein plant foods can help you manage type 1 #diabetes. @Kris_Carr Even though there’s nothing that can prevent type 1 diabetes, Jen has made use of the amazing technology available and found some incredible plant-powered tricks to help her son thrive. And in honor of November being Diabetes Awareness Month, she’s here to share her nutrition and mama bear expertise with all of you. Although, these tips apply to adults, as well. Take it away, Jen! Thanks, Kris. While finding out that you or your child has a chronic health issue like diabetes is scary at first, it quickly becomes part of your daily routine. We’ve found a way to make sure Jake has a normal, healthy and happy life regardless of his diagnosis. And, the same goes for anyone with type 1. But before we get to the tips that’ll help you manage this health challenge, let’s cover some basics. The symptoms of type 1 are very subt Continue reading >>

Tips For Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Tips For Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

You might think of type 1 diabetes as a young persons disease. It was once known as juvenile diabetes , and most people are diagnosed with it as children or teens . But about a quarter of people with type 1 arent diagnosed until theyre adults -- some as late as age 80 or 90. Theres no cure, but there are things you can do to make managing it as an adult easier. Every person who has diabetes needs a personal plan. Youre in charge of putting that plan into action, but you dont have to figure it out on your own. You should have a team to help you, including a general physician, an endocrinologist, a nutritionist or dietitian, and a diabetes educator to teach you how to live better with the condition. You also may need to see other specialists, like a podiatrist (for your feet and lower legs) or an ophthalmologist (for your eyes ). Talk with your health care team regularly, and keep them in the loop on your condition. High blood sugar can affect organs and tissues throughout your body. Even if you control your diabetes well, issues still may happen slowly over time. Get checked for them regularly, and watch for warning signs like tingling, numbness, or swelling in your hands and feet; blurred or double vision ; or sores that dont heal. If you catch and treat these kinds of things early, you can slow or even stop the damage. Rather than the usual three meals daily, you may need to eat small amounts of food throughout the day. Talk with your dietitian about the best choices to keep your blood sugar steady. They may include healthy fat (nuts) and protein (lean meat, fish , beans), whole grains (brown rice, oatmeal ), colorful veggies (spinach, peppers , broccoli, sweet potatoes), and low-calorie drinks like unsweetened iced tea or water flavored with fresh fruit. Regular phys Continue reading >>

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