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Type 1 Diabetes Temporary Tattoos

Tattoos And Body Piercings: A Guide For People With Diabetes

Tattoos And Body Piercings: A Guide For People With Diabetes

The best way to know if it’s safe for you to get a tattoo with diabetes is to see your doctor or healthcare provider. They can review your numbers, draw your A1C, and determine if your diabetes is controlled. If your diabetes is not well controlled, or if your blood pressure is elevated, you should take measures to get both within range prior to getting a tattoo. After you are evaluated by the healthcare provider and they confirm that your diabetes is under control,you will be given clearance to get a tattoo or a piercing. It will also be a good idea to have the doctor write a note, or even a prescription, in attention of the tattoo parlor or piercing clinic that will be performing the procedure. Normally, a tattoo or piercing establishment will take the word of the client, and the forms that you fill out there should have a question about diabetes, and whether it’s controlled. Your response should be honest on the form, and if your diabetes is not well-controlled, lying about it could be to your peril. The question is on the form for your own safety, Understand that it is imperative that your diabetes must be controlled, along with your blood pressure, prior to obtaining a piercing or tattoo with diabetes. Considerations for getting a tattoo or piercing with diabetes There are many things that your doctor or healthcare provider should consider prior to giving you the ok for the procedure, even with your blood sugar and A1C in your target ranges. If it’s a tattoo, your doctor may want to know its location on your body. Areas farther away from the heart, and areas with poor blood flow are harder to heal, and people with diabetes may have existing compromised circulation in these areas. If it’s a body piercing, where will it be placed is important to consider. Wil Continue reading >>

Pain-free Temporary Tattoo Monitors Blood Glucose

Pain-free Temporary Tattoo Monitors Blood Glucose

Canadian Pharmacy Health Blog > Posts > Health > Pain-Free Temporary Tattoo Monitors Blood Glucose Pain-Free Temporary Tattoo Monitors Blood Glucose If you have diabetes, you know this serious chronic disease is prevalent all over the world. Despite numerous medical advances, it remains a leading cause of death. To control diabetes and prevent a host of complications, you must monitor your blood-sugar levels frequently. However, the discomfort that the present-day methods inflict makes many patients reluctant to check their blood glucose. To overcome the current poor diabetes management techniques, scientists have developed a non-invasive glucose monitoring system thats painless. Whether your diabetes is Type 1 (childhood onset), Type 2 (adult onset), or gestational (while pregnant), monitoring your blood-sugar levels will help you keep them as near to normal as possible. The two main current ways to test glucose have disadvantages that the future tattoo option could overcome.Glucometer: This small portable device is the most common blood-sugar measurement method. First, you must prick a finger with a lancet. Then you insert a test strip with a blood sample into your meter, which displays your reading. Testing your blood glucose helps you discover how certain foods, workouts, illnesses, stress, and medications cause fluctuations. As Actos helps control your Type 2 diabetes blood sugar levels, it also increases your cells insulin sensitivity to use that glucose as energy.Some meters store numerous results. Comparisons over time can help you spot major changes and predict your levels for specific daily times. Glucose meters and diabetes testing supplies can be affordable on some medical insurance plans. However, repeating the finger-prick step multiple times per day can Continue reading >>

Medical Alert Diabetic Type 1 Insulin Dependent Temporary Tattoos

Medical Alert Diabetic Type 1 Insulin Dependent Temporary Tattoos

Medical Alert Diabetic Type 1 Insulin Dependent Temporary Tattoos Scared of long-term commitment? We know the feeling. But with 100% customizable temporary tattoos, now you can have your cake and eat it too. Customize your own design or choose from thousands of pre-made designs, temporary tattoos are the perfect addition to tailgating, fun runs, and special events. Please note tattoos will arrive in a mirrored from to what you see above. When applied, it will be the right side up! Dimensions of each sheet is: 10.5"h x 8.25"w, but you choose the size of the tattoos Prints in full color and non-colored areas are clear so they look real on your skin Comes off after a few days or wipe clean with baby oil To prolong life of tattoo, avoid chlorinated water Not recommended for children 12 and under Designer Tip: To ensure the highest quality print, please note that this product's customizable design area measures 8" x 10" 1. Make sure skin is clean, dry, and free of anything oil-based (such as lotions) 2. Cut tattoo as close to the edge of the design as possible 3. Remove the clear plastic cover, and place the tattoo face down onto skin 4. Grab a wet towel and allow the backside of the tattoo to get soaked for a few seconds Tattoos are intended to last a few days but may come off faster after a shower or bath. To remove, saturate tattoo with baby oil for 10 seconds, then wipe away with cotton ball or tissue. Do not use if you have sensitive skin or if you are allergic to adhesive. Wrinkles and air bubbles may occur on your tattoo page during our production process. Be advised that the tattoo adhesive will still work as expected regardless of this appearance. INGREDIENTS: Black, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow inks. Comprised of Carbon Black, Proprietary dyes & pigments, Proprietary org Continue reading >>

Needle-free Tattoos Can Check Diabetics' Sugar Levels

Needle-free Tattoos Can Check Diabetics' Sugar Levels

MORE A temporary electronic "tattoo" may one day offer diabetics a bloodless way to check blood sugar levels, researchers say. Diabetes affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is among the leading causes of death and disability. People with diabetes must test their glucose levels several times a day, using devices with a tiny needle to draw blood from a fingertip. But the pain of this constant finger-pricking may drive patients to avoid checking their blood sugar levels, so researchers have been searching for less invasive ways to monitor glucose. "Monitoring glucose in a noninvasive fashion is certainly one of the most important fields in the area of wearable health sensors," lead study author Amay Bandodkar, a nanoengineer at the University of California at San Diego, told Live Science. Now Bandodkar, along with Joseph Wang at UCSD and their colleagues, have developed a flexible device that sticks to skin like a rub-on tattoo and sends a mild electrical current over the skin to detect a person's blood sugar levels, without needles. The scientists tested their device on three women and four men who did not have diabetes. Two or three of the study participants reported feeling a mild tingling in the first 10 seconds of the test, but none reported feeling discomfort. To see how well the tattoo picked up the spike in blood sugar levels expected after a meal, the researchers measured the participants' blood sugar before and after they consumed a carbohydrate-rich sandwich and soda in the lab. The device performed just as well at detecting this glucose spike as a traditional finger-stick monitor, the researchers said. [10 Technologies That Will Transform Your Life] The new device consists of electrodes made of silver and silver chloride ink, and a blood glucose Continue reading >>

Creating Diabetes Tattoos That Sense Changes In Blood Sugar

Creating Diabetes Tattoos That Sense Changes In Blood Sugar

It’s not often that the words “cool” and “diabetes” get used in the same sentence, but researchers at MIT and Harvard have joined the two concepts with an idea for creating tattoos that change color based on the blood sugar level of the person wearing them. The project has the oddly dystopian name of the Dermal Abyss (or, as they call it d-abyss) and is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab and Harvard Medical School, according to Katia Vega, a post doctoral associate at MIT and a member of the team. “The Dermal Abyss is a proof-of-concept that illustrates the potential of culturally and medically integrated biosensors,” Vega says. “They are biosensor tattoos that visibly react to changes in the metabolism. The purpose of the work is to light the imagination of biotechnologists and stimulate public support for such efforts.” The tattoos they designed will not be showing up in a pharmacy or tattoo shop any time soon. “The purpose of the work is to highlight a novel possibility for biosensors rather than bring a medical device to market,” Vega says. “As such, there are currently no plans to develop the Dermal Abyss as a product or to pursue clinical trials.” Like a hot concept car, there is real technology in the tattoos that were produced for the project. Various iterations of the tattoos sense changes not only in glucose but in pH, which can indicate dehydration and changes in sodium ion, which can give indications of hypertension. For glucose, the colors change from a light blue at a reading of five, and go through five shade changes until it’s dark brown at a reading of 110. The team at d-abyss inserted biosensors in place of traditionally used tattoo ink into skin from a pig at a depth of 10 millimeter Continue reading >>

Tattoos And Diabetes

Tattoos And Diabetes

Tweet Tattoos are a popular form of body art that involves using needles to inject ink under the skin. Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't have a tattoo, but before deciding to have one done you must be well and ensure that your diabetes is well controlled. High blood sugar levels, for example, can complicate the healing process and increase the risk of infection. Blood pressure should also be kept within the recommended target range. Bear in mind that your blood sugar level may rise whilst your tattoo is being applied. As this process can be quite long, painful and somewhat stressful, particularly if you've chosen a large and complex design - another reason why they must be stable before the procedure starts. However, they should return to normal the next day. Other things to consider before getting a tattoo include: Placement Permanent body art can be applied to nearly every part of the body. For people with diabetes, there are certain areas that should be avoided including those with poor circulation, such as: Buttocks Shins Ankles Feet Common insulin injection sites such as arms, abdomen and thighs. Tattoos in these places usually take longer to heal, which can lead to complications (e.g. infection). Design Tattoo designs are usually based on things that are meaningful or significant to the individual. For a person with diabetes, this could be something that includes clear medical symbols and/or text that indicates their condition. These so-called 'diabetes tattoos' have become quite common in recent years, with many diabetics using them to replace medical jewellery as a permanent form of diabetes identification. Design inspiration Members of the Diabetes.co.uk Facebook page shared their tattoos with us. Have a look, they're certainly a source of inspiration. Thi Continue reading >>

The Colorful Kit Helping Diabetic Kids Manage Their Injections With Temporary Tattoos

The Colorful Kit Helping Diabetic Kids Manage Their Injections With Temporary Tattoos

The Colorful Kit Helping Diabetic Kids Manage Their Injections With Temporary Tattoos No kid looks forward to getting their shots, but for children living with type 1 diabetes, insulin injections are a part of everyday life. When Renata Souza Luque, a graduate from the Parsons School of Design in New York, saw how much of a toll the routine was taking on her 7-year-old cousin Thomas, she designed a product to make the process a little easier for kids like him. The result, Thomy , is a tool kit that aims to make insulin injections less intimidating to young diabetics, as Dezeen reports. The brightly colored, easy-to-carry kit is designed for ages 4 and up, with an insulin pen specifically made to fit in a childs hand. In addition to being easier for kids to hold and use, the Thomy pen is designed to be more fun than your average insulin injector. It has a thermochromic release valve, so that when it touches the patients skin, it begins to change color. The color-morphing doesnt serve any medical purpose, but it provides kids with a distraction as theyre receiving the injection. The kit also includes playful temporary tattoos to help kids figure out where their injections should go. Diabetics need to change the site of their injections regularly to prevent lumps of fat from developing under the skin, and for patients injecting themselves multiple times a day, keeping track of specific spots can be difficult. Kids can apply one of Thomy's temporary tattoos over their injection sites as a map for their shots. Each time they need an injection, they wipe off one of the tattoo's colored dots with alcohol and insert the needle in its place. When all the dots are gone, it's time to move on to a new area of the skin. Souza Luque originally created Thomy for her senior capstone p Continue reading >>

Medic Alert Tattoo | Diabetic Connect

Medic Alert Tattoo | Diabetic Connect

- Style/image: I think the bracelets are hokey and tattoos are cool. I don't have any tattoos now, partly because I've always half worried that I'd never find gainful employment if I did. But isn't a serious medical condition like diabetes a GREAT excuse to have a tattoo? - Safety. As it is, I never wear my medic alert bracelet. It's a pain to put on and I've never found one I liked (see above). - Will never be able to lie about not having diabetes. - Social stigma attached to being tattooed. - What if my medic alert tattoo turns out to be just just as hokey as a medic alert bracelet, only more permanent? I would really appreciate input from others on this. Thanks! UPDATE: Apparently ALL the cool diabetics are doing it! I found this site with a ton of pictures of medic alert tattoos for type 1's: As long as your diabetes is well managed. Theres no problem. Suggest you talk to your doctor beforehand I have had the tatoo on my left wrist for years. On the underside of my wrist I got "Diabetic" tatooed in a nice looking cursive writing. The positive comments over the years have been worth it, from the public, friends, & emergency personnell. C What are the chances of infection. I thought being diabetic you would really have to worry about it. How do you know where you go is a safe place to get it done? This was discussion in 2008. What about 2011? this is such a rad idea!!! i have several tattoos already and i always joked about getting a diabetic tattoo of my insulin pump on my side haha but, this is a great idea! i think im gonna get one ;) do it!!!! Thinking about getting one myself. I work in "high voltage" conditions and the bracelet/necklace is a safety hazard. As far as "hokey", that depends on who does the tatoo. I had two done at age 25 and they sucked. I had a c Continue reading >>

Tattoo You! | Diabetes Health

Tattoo You! | Diabetes Health

In the March 2000 issue of Diabetes Health, reader Ruth OHara of New Hampshire said her 12-year-old son has diabetes, and trying to get him to wear any type of medical alert bracelet or necklace met with extremely limited success. He asked if he could Just get a tattoo on my arm, that way I wont lose it. Thinking this might be a good solution, OHara spoke with nurses at her local ER and they agreed. However, she was unable to obtain a tattoo in New Hampshire or any of the neighboring states because the law states that one must be over 18, even with parental consent, to be tattooed. While I understand the intent of the law, and under any other circumstance would not want my child to have a tattoo, I truly believe that a tattoo might well be life saving for a person with a life-threatening disease. No Harm in Getting a Tattoo if You Have Diabetes In a related matter, Barb Courtney of Merrit Island, Florida, asked, Is there is any danger for people with diabetes who want to get tattoos? According to S. William Levy, MD, clinical professor of dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, there is not. Theres no harm in getting a tattoo as long as you take the necessary precautions, says Levy. First of all, make absolutely certain that you go to an accredited tattoo artist. Your State Board of Cosmetology may grant certificates to tattoo artists who fulfill the necessary hygienic measures. Levy warns people with diabetes there are certain places you shouldnt have tattoos, including: places with poor circulation such as ankles areas where you take your insulin shots such as the abdomen, arms or thighs. Levy also adds that at least 50 percent of the people who receive a tattoo regret it later. Removing a tattoo may end up costing several hundred d Continue reading >>

Temporary Tattoo Could Let Diabetics Monitor Glucose Levels Without Jabbing Themselves

Temporary Tattoo Could Let Diabetics Monitor Glucose Levels Without Jabbing Themselves

Temporary tattoo could let diabetics monitor glucose levels without jabbing themselves Finger-prick blood tests are currently an unpleasant necessity for diabetics. Perhaps before too long, however, the blood glucose information gathered in those tests could be attained using something much more fun and painless than a lancet a temporary tattoo. Developed by a team led by University of California, San Diego grad student Amay Bandodkar, the flexible prototype device consists of precisely-patterned electrodes printed on temporary tattoo paper. After the tattoo is applied to the patient, a "very mild" electrical current is also applied to their skin. This causes sodium ions in the fluid between their skin cells to migrate toward the electrodes. Those ions carry glucose molecules from the fluid with them. Using a built-in sensor, the tattoo then measures the strength of the electrical charge produced by that glucose. As a result, it's able to ascertain the glucose levels in the patient's bloodstream. In lab tests, tattoos were applied to non-diabetic test subjects who then ate a carbohydrate-rich meal. Afterwards, the tattoos detected a spike in their glucose levels just as accurately as a traditional finger-prick test. Although the tattoo currently doesn't provide a numerical readout of those levels, a separate device is being developed for that very purpose. The team is also working on making the tattoos more durable, as they currently last for about a day once applied to the skin fortunately, they're very inexpensive. A paper on the research was recently published in the journal Analytical Chemistry . Bandodkar's team is working in the lab of Prof. Joseph Wang, who has already developed a lactate-measuring temporary tattoo . Continue reading >>

Small But Mighty Creating Targeted Tattoos For Injection Sites

Small But Mighty Creating Targeted Tattoos For Injection Sites

Small But Mighty: Creating Targeted Tattoos for Injection Sites Small But Mighty: Creating Targeted Tattoos for Injection Sites Email addresses will not be shared with 3rd parties. See privacy policy We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. We talked recently about how diabetes is part of a much larger chronic illness community , and that's a strength we don't often tap into. Sometimes innovations that can help us PWDs (people with diabetes) come from folks dealing with other conditions too -- like a small Minneapolis, MN, firm called Visual Medical , that was formed about two years ago based on one woman's family ordeal. Her name is Rachael Jacques and she grew up with a younger brother, Luke, who is now 25 and has been living with type 1 diabetes since the age of 5. Her other brother, Aaron, was severely handicapped after a near-fatal episode of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Now a wife and mom of three,Rachael was introduced to several more illnesses when her husband was diagnosed with lymphoma a few years ago and her oldest son, Carter, was diagnosed with autism, asthma, neurological tics, and Graves disease. To say Rachael is a veteran caregiver is an understatement! Along with a friend who's a registered nurse, Rachel launched Visual Medical in 2011 to provide unique products to help manage a wide range of chronic illnesses, including diabetes. And now, after two years of planning, their company is about ready to release its first product, called Tartoos. Designed as a temporary tattoo grid that helps you track injection sites, the concept kind of reminds us of something Roche offered a few years back but has since faded away. Really great concept, though Continue reading >>

Tattoos

Tattoos

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and so November of 2006 seemed the appropriate time to have a diabetes awareness tattoo created. My son, Liam was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the ripe old age of two. Every day I strive to keep him as healthy as possible. Every day I work to ensure that his life is as normal as possible. Diabetes does not make that easy. That is one of the reasons that I created the online community called Diabetes Advocacy (www.diabetesadvocacy.com ). Each year Diabetes Advocacy has done its bit to increase awareness of diabetes and diabetes related issues in this country. We have sent out calendars filled with people living with diabetes and have created booklets filled with their stories. In November of 2006, we took diabetes awareness to a level. Across North America—from Newfoundland to California, people came together through Diabetes Advocacy with one common goal. They have decided to have a tattoo done to raise awareness of Type 1 Diabetes. I did as well. No one in my immediate family had a clue that I was even considering this. My oldest son was shocked. My youngest told me I took after him and was tough! Despite the initial shock, the reaction has been the same—Wow! I would like to thank Bernard at Peek-a-Boo Tattoos in Stephenville for creating a true work of art and a picture of love. The tattoo you see below was created by him from a very rough concept I brought to him. He created two hearts for my two children—equal in my love. He added a touch of color that reflected their birthstones. He kept hues soft and loving. The ribbons are grey and in Liam’s case, end in the Diabetes Awareness ribbon. His heart also shows the drop of blood that he must part with every time he eats and plays so that we can ensure his blood glucose Continue reading >>

The Safe Way To Get Ink When You Have Diabetes

The Safe Way To Get Ink When You Have Diabetes

There was a time when tattoos were something only sailors, bikers, and other hard-livin’ rebels inked into their skin. Now 1 in 5 people have at least one—tattoos aren’t taboo anymore. But can someone with diabetes get one? Of course! And if you’re thinking about getting a medical alert tattoo, you’re taking a great step to ensure proper care in case of emergency. What are the Risks? Suzanne Ghiloni, B.S.N, R.N., C.D.E., a nurse educator at Joslin Diabetes Center, says tattoo precautions for patients with diabetes aren’t all that different from anyone else getting a tattoo. “Make sure the parlor you choose is licensed, state inspected, and clean,” she says. When choosing a tattoo parlor, ask about how they manage their equipment. The shop you choose should: Have a licensed/accredited tattoo artist (preferably someone with artistic talent) Use a brand new needle just for you Autoclave their tattoo machines between customers Use disposable ink pots “The only time I’d be hesitant is if the person has uncontrolled diabetes,” says Ghiloni. Her advice to anyone with diabetes, “get your HBA1C in a good range before you go to the tattoo parlor.” The reason: if your levels are out of control, you put yourself at risk for slower healing, nasty infections and, in severe cases, amputation. “A person with diabetes need to be hyper-vigilant about preventing infection,” says Ghiloni. “Follow all the aftercare precautions.” Stephan Lanphear, an award winning tattoo artist who helped legalize tattoo parlors in Massachusetts, is also a Joslin patient living with type 1 diabetes. During the legalization process, Lanphear helped the board of health write guidelines and regulations for the tattoo industry. “Health releases in tattoo studios have a questio Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Insulin Dependent Medical Alert Temporary

Type 1 Diabetes Insulin Dependent Medical Alert Temporary

CURRENT DELIVERY TIME IS ABOUT 2 WEEKS FROM PURCHASE DATE FOR U.S. ORDERS. --Rush Shipping (available during checkout) is delivery 1 WEEK from order date.-- 1. Choose your desired amount of TYPE 1 DIABETES tattoos from the drop down menu, and add to cart. *The size of each tattoo is 2" x 1.5". A great item for any parent for added peace of mind when in a public place or leaving an insulin dependent child in the care of others.* **Application and removal instructions can be found on the back of the tattoos.** ***These tattoos are NOT waterproof. They can stay on after getting wet, but will become sticky and can rub off if water/sweat is introduced after they are applied. For easiest removal, place in an area with little to no hair like the top of hand or inner arm. *** CURRENT DELIVERY TIME IS ABOUT 2 WEEKS FROM PURCHASE DATE FOR U.S. ORDERS. --Rush Shipping (available during checkout) is delivery 1 WEEK from order date.-- 1. Choose your desired amount of TYPE 1 DIABETES tattoos from the drop down menu, and add to cart. *The size of each tattoo is 2" x 1.5". A great item for any parent for added peace of mind when in a public place or leaving an insulin dependent child in the care of others.* **Application and removal instructions can be found on the back of the tattoos.** ***These tattoos are NOT waterproof. They can stay on after getting wet, but will become sticky and can rub off if water/sweat is introduced after they are applied. For easiest removal, place in an area with little to no hair like the top of hand or inner arm. *** Continue reading >>

Temporary Tattoos And Device Help Children Take Insulin Injections

Temporary Tattoos And Device Help Children Take Insulin Injections

WRITTEN BY: Mariana Gomez As parents of young children with Type 1 diabetes, we know that one of the most complicated self-management tasks is insulin injection. We know well that the syringes and needles used today are small and thin, but this does not avoid it from being a complicated task for children and, of course, for their parents. The world of diabetes is rapidly advancing, and new technologies to manage our condition are being developed. Unfortunately, it seems that the medical and the aesthetics cannot always go hand in hand, and we are not always able to find attractive enough devices for our little ones. In this search for tools that help us in the educational processes of children with Type 1 diabetes that can facilitate their lives with this condition, we found Renata Souza. Renata is also Thomas’ aunt. Thomas was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 5 years old. Thomas and his family are people who are always looking for ways to immerse themselves in knowledge and become experts in the management of an extraordinarily complex condition. This is how Renata created Thomy. Thomy is an insulin kit; it is a Mexican design that has the purpose of helping children when it comes to the application of insulin. It includes temporary tattoos with planetary designs and others (really suitable for children) so that they can print them to their body and remember insulin injection sites (working in the rotation of sites and protecting their skin from possible injuries). Each temporary tattoo has a different design, but of course, each design is beautiful and thematically engaging for kids. These symbols have red markings so that when disinfecting the area (when preparing the skin before the injection) the mark will be erased. After several injections, each red d Continue reading >>

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