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Type 1 Diabetes Support Groups For Parents

Support For Children With Diabetes And Their Families

Support For Children With Diabetes And Their Families

Support for Children with Diabetes and Their Families Support for Children with Diabetes and Their Families We are in process of redesigning the group formerly titled The Diabetes Support Group for Parents. Our intent is to help parents and children with Type 1 diabetes learn to adjust to and better understand their child's illness. When a child is first diagnosed with diabetes , a parent's natural lack of experience with this condition often leads to a host of questions and concerns about a child's healthy future. In the beginning, diabetes can seem like a looming hill of never ending worries. We envision a way for families with diabetes to connect and talk about this unexpected hurdle in life. Parents dealing with diabetes for the first time may find it helpful to join together on this unfamiliar path, and to be guided by the knowledge of more experienced parents. Children with diabetes may find it worthwhile to meet other children living day to day with diabetes. With support, diabetes is revealed as a manageable illness that does not have to be the cause of endless worries and obstacles. The Diabetes Support Group for Parents was founded in 1991. Our outpatient education program is recognized by the American Diabetes Association and we are affiliated with Washington University School of Medicine. When: To be decided. We are currently in the planning stages. Please contact us if you would like to complete a survey about future meetings. For Information: To learn more about the Diabetes Support Group for Parents, please contact Beth Alseth and Maureen Burch,Diabetes Educators, at 314.454.2266 Continue reading >>

Cdf Support Groups

Cdf Support Groups

You are not alone with type 1 diabetes! Newly diagnosed? Been doing this for years? Hit a rough patch? Need/want to talk to others affected by diabetes?…whatever your situation, please come for some informal conversation. All are welcome, adults, parents, children and teenagers, and other family members. We want to give you the opportunity to meet other people who are affected by diabetes, whether you are the type 1 or have family, friends, significant others, etc. who do. You’ll love being a part of the diabetes community! Join our mailing list to receive updates on CDF Support Groups! Timings and location vary, but are currently focused in Denver & surrounding areas. Receive Support Group Updates Continue reading >>

Finding Support: For Parents Of Children With Diabetes

Finding Support: For Parents Of Children With Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that affects the whole family, especially when a child is diagnosed. Whether your child was just diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes or you're entering a new life stage or experience with diabetes, everyone needs some emotional support now and then. The memory of the moment of diabetes diagnosis is a profound one. Psychologists call it a 'flashbulb' memory, in which you can recall all the exact elements of the moment you heard the news, with startling clarity. Parents often go through a grieving process when they find out that their child has diabetes. It can be difficult to come to terms with the idea that a child has a chronic condition that will need to be managed for the rest of his or her life. It's normal to feel grief and sadness. Many parents also feel guilty and wonder if they could have prevented diabetes somehow. Some parents also might feel unsure about taking on the tasks of caring for a child with diabetes, such as administering medications and helping their child follow a meal plan. Other common concerns from parents of children with diabetes are medical care and costs, how to manage diabetes at school or daycare, how to manage diabetes during holidays and special occasions, how to prepare for camps and sleepovers, finding a babysitter and what to do on sick days. The diabetes diagnosis can cause a grieving for your child’s lost health, in the same way as you may grieve for a lost loved one. It is a natural human tendency to live life rarely thinking about our health or mortality. It is not until something life changing happens that you suddenly become hyper-aware that no life is without its limits. Below are the stages of grief. You may not have experienced all of these emotions towards diabetes, or in this particular order. Stage 1: D Continue reading >>

Parenting Your Teen With Type 1 Diabetes

Parenting Your Teen With Type 1 Diabetes

By Nicole Kofman and Ashley Dartnell Twitter summary: Teenagers + type 1 diabetes = a challenge! Tips from #CWDFFL15 & a parent For most families, “‘adolescence is second only to infancy’ in terms of the upheaval it generates” within a household. Add managing type 1 diabetes into the mix, and things can get complicated. For parents, it can be daunting to balance giving teens space to grow and monitoring a 24/7 condition as dangerous as type 1 diabetes. At CWD’s Friends For Life conference in July, Dr. Jill Weissberg-Benchell and CDEs Natalie Bellini and Marissa Town led a workshop called “Parenting Your Teen with Type 1.” There, they elicited an impressive list of diabetes-specific concerns that parents have regarding their teens, including but not limited to: How can they have the peace of mind of knowing their child is reasonably within range without being a helicopter parent? What will happen when their teen begins to drive and could have a low? How do growth hormones interact with insulin and affect blood sugar? How will alcohol affect diabetes management? What additional steps do people with type 1 diabetes need to take to be prepared for college entrance exams? All that – on top of keeping up with schoolwork and extracurricular activities! We learned some great tips from the experts and parents at this workshop. Plus, we sat down with Ashley Dartnell, a parent of one of diaTribe’s summer associates who has type 1 diabetes, to learn more about her personal experience parenting a teen with type 1 and to gain a unique perspective outside of what we learned from the Friends for Life workshop. Our top five actionable tips for caring for a teen with diabetes 1. Numbers are not a scoreboard. As the all-star team of facilitators shared at the FFL worksho Continue reading >>

Support Programs Nevada Diabetes Association

Support Programs Nevada Diabetes Association

Meets Every 2nd Wednesday of the Month at: Terry Lee Wells Discovery Museum -490 Center Street-Reno, NV 89501-Time: 6:30-7:30 pm Diabetic Children and Family Support Group and Reno Family Support Group- are special and supportive environment for parents and children to learn about diabetes management. Features include: guest speakers, youth activities, special events and parties. These events take place the first Tuesday (LV) and the 2nd Wednesday of the month (in Reno). DCAF/ FS have helped ease the pain and frustration of newly diagnosed families. This group has created a forum for those affect by diabetes to come and share thoughts, ideas and ease suffering. 3.Las Vegas Injection Connection and Northern Injection Connection Teen Support Groups Events and Times are all located on calendar . Please also see the Teen Events and Programming-Injection Connection Tab 4.ADEMS Adult Diabetes Support Group Las Vegas Meets the 2nd Tuesday of the month. West Charleston Library- 6301 West Charleston Blvd- Las Vegas, NV. Time 5pm. ADEMS Provides valuable up to date information on the management and control of diabetes. When one is in the center of the community there is no need to look in from afar. ADEMS is where the in crowd with diabetes is on the second Tuesday of each month. If you ever had questions about diabetes and wish to know how others are managing their disease process or if you just desire new and improved techniques for the control of diabetes then we are here for you. Meets on the 4th Monday of each month at 6-7 pm Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican, Siena Campus-MacDonald Conference Center-3001 St. Rose Pkwy.-Henderson, NV 89052 In this support group, parents and kids with diabetes (up to age 12) share and learn new ways to overcome obstacles and be successful in Continue reading >>

Support For Parents: The Pep Squad

Support For Parents: The Pep Squad

Whether your family is new todiabetesor youre encountering a new set of challenges, the DRI Foundation is here to help. After all,we're in this together. Our PEP Squad -- Parents Empowering Parents -- offers emotional support and practical tips from professionals and fellow parents wholive with diabetes day-to-day. On ourprivate PEP Squad group on Facebook , you can connect with other diabetes parents, sharestories and struggles, complain, vent, or mentor and shed new light. Someone is usually "out there"at any time of day-- even in the wee hours after that 3 a.m. blood sugar check. Sometimes, all you need is to know youre not alone and thatsomeone else gets it. The DRI Foundation takes the opinions of this group seriously. We responded to members' concerns and because this is aclosed, or private, group, only approvedmembers are able to read posts. Some of the topics discussed include insurance issues, nighttime testing, travel tips, facing fears, holiday hints, bragging rights (about the brave kids!), tools, teens and tantrums. Whatever the issue, there are usually comments or suggestions. However, please remember that everyone is different, and you should check with your health care professionals before changing something your doctor had previously advised. Getmonthly news-you-can-use likebalancing life at work and athome, travel tips, parental grief, managing sick days, baby sitters and more. Learn from diabetes experts and parents just like you who might already have dealt with the same issue you're facing now. Sign up as a DRI Insider and we'll email the next "PEP Talk" to your inbox. Your child was just diagnosed with diabetes. Now what? So many parentshave asked this question.Our PEP Squad brochure can give you the answersand information on how to go on living y Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Resources And Support

Type 1 Diabetes Resources And Support

Find support you need when you need it most Whether you're interested in joining a vibrant online T1D community, in need of advice from someone who’s been there or looking for educational tools to help you or your loved one manage the disease—JDRF is here to help. Whatever your question and wherever you are, JDRF’s online T1D resource community connects you with others—online or in your area—who’ve been where you are. Support and information near you JDRF chapters offer a variety of events to inform, support and connect you with the T1D community. Along with several generous partners, we provide information to help you understand and better manage the daily burden of T1D to stay as strong and healthy as possible. When your child receives a diagnosis of T1D, it can feel overwhelming. As you adjust to life with T1D, you’ll find helpful information and support in the JDRF Bag of Hope®. The JDRF T1D Care Kit is a free resource providing information and tools to educate, support and inspire adults newly diagnosed with T1D. Toolkits for all ages and stages Our free T1D toolkits for parents, adults and educators are comprehensive guides that arm you with the knowledge, resources and confidence you and your family need to navigate life with T1D. Continue reading >>

Support For Patients And Families

Support For Patients And Families

Our clinic social workers, Rachel Hendrickson, LCSW and Amanda Murdoch, CSW, will be facilitating a parent support group at Primary Children's Hospital in Salt Lake City. This group will be focused on supporting and connecting parents of children with type 1 diabetes. Our next support group will be held in Fall 2018. Please call us or check back for more information. Our clinical social workers are available to meet with parents for short term therapy (up to 3 sessions). Focus of the therapy could include adjustment to diagnosis, burnout with diabetes, depression, and anxiety. If longer term therapy is needed, clinical social workers can help in connecting with resources. Please call us if you are interested or have questions about therapy sessions. Each November we host an awards night for clinic patients who have had diabetes for 10 years or more. The Lilly Diabetes Journey Awards honor individuals who have managed their diabetes for 10, 25, 50, and even 75 years. As our patients are under 18, we are unable to nominate them ourselves. If you are interested in participating, please go to this website and complete the application if your child qualifies for this recognition: . More details will be provided closer to the event date. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facebook Support Groups

Type 1 Diabetes Facebook Support Groups

I loathe Facebook even though I use it daily for work and support. Did you know that there are a handful of Type 1 Diabetes support groups on Facebook? I am sharing all of the national ones that I have found. I skipped sharing local ones as those will not apply to everyone. Type 1 Diabetes is such a difficult thing to manage and being able to vent or ask questions and get answers right away is phenomenal. I do not take medical advice but ideas to help assist in the day to day management of Eldests Type 1 Diabetes ! If you or your child has Type 1 Diabetes then do yourself a favor and read through these support group descriptions and find a few that you can join! CGM in the Cloud a group for those to share their experiences with open source solutions to send data from the Dexcom G4 to the cloud so that it can be accessed anywhereso our kids/friends/parents can be monitored while they are in another room, in another state, at a play date, sleepover, sports activity, or even at school. We are closer than ever to the prospect of a safer, more effective, less burdensome life with type 1 diabetes for millions of people and WE ARE NOT WAITING! Dexcom -This is a group for people who use (or know people who use) Dexcom Continuous Glucose Monitoring technology. This is not run by Dexcom and is no way affiliated with the company.This group is closed so that conversations dont appear on your timeline, but do not assume that it gives you any privacy beyond that. Moms with T1 Diabetes -Moms with T1 always need support! This is a closed and safe place to share what is going on in the day to day life. Omnipod & Dexcom Users This group is for anyone using both the Omnipod and Dexcom systems. A place to share information and for support.The main goal of this group is for support. Promot Continue reading >>

[full Text] Supporting Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Litera | Pi

[full Text] Supporting Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Litera | Pi

Editor who approved publication: Dr Johnny Chen 1Graduate School, Gordon College of Education, 2Department of Nursing, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel Abstract: This review provides the reader with an integrative view of the literature on the challenges families of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus face, and the interventions proposed in research and practice to facilitate their coping and efficacy in supporting patient care. We present background information regarding the condition and the general challenges it poses, and then focus on younger patients and their families, while reviewing the literature and emerging patterns describing pitfalls and proposed interventions. We present directions for future thought and further research based on what we find (and fail to find) in the literature. Keywords: challenges, interventions, patient care, blood sugar, emotional, psychological Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a condition affecting younger patients, challenging them with life-threatening outcomes. The condition requires that patients adopt a restrictive lifestyle and diet, and monitor their blood sugar levels frequently. The young patients, naturally, must rely on their parents and families for instruction, support, and daily help with coping with such a complex set of demands. Moreover, beyond the challenges of daily care and monitoring, living with the constant threat of health deterioration and future complications, the young patients face emotional and psychological difficulties that reflect on their own coping as well as their social circle and family. The condition may therefore be considered a family condition challenging the patients entire social and familial circle in numerous ways. While the literature is replete with medical aspects of diagnosis Continue reading >>

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

They mean well. They really do. But many people just don’t realize that the seemingly “helpful,” reassuring, or casual, off-hand remarks they make upon learning that your child has type 1 diabetes just…aren’t. And who can blame them? They probably know as much about type 1 as you did before your son or daughter was diagnosed. Still, some of the comments T1D parents hear can be supremely frustrating or even downright hurtful. So here’s your chance to set these well-intentioned friends, family members and acquaintances straight — by sharing this list as a public service announcement or by picking up some ideas for clever, tactful ways to respond when you hear one of these doozies, courtesy of Jeniece Trast, R.N., C.D.E., M.A., clinical research nurse manager and certified diabetes educator at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. 1. “Well, at least it’s not fatal.” This type of statement minimizes all the work parents do to manage their child’s diabetes — and ignores the fact that many parents do worry very much about their child’s long-term health and safety. “Diabetes is a challenging disease to manage because it involves food, insulin, blood sugar monitoring, exercise and so much more,” says Trast. “People who are able to manage their diabetes well are usually healthy individuals who lead long successful lives. However, there is always the risk of low and high blood sugars no matter how well controlled a person’s diabetes is, and both of these things can be life-threatening if not properly treated.” Parents, consider responding: “I am so glad that my child is happy and healthy right now. However, diabetes unfortunately can cause medical emergencies that can be very dangerous, so we work hard every day to try to prevent those. Continue reading >>

One Mom's Challenge: Raising A Teen With Type 1 Diabetes

One Mom's Challenge: Raising A Teen With Type 1 Diabetes

Raising a teenager and learning to let go can be an emotional experience for any mom. But for Michelle Monson, whose 13-year-old son has type 1 diabetes, giving up control — and allowing her child to take his health in his own hands — comes at an especially distressing cost. Brendan was diagnosed with type 1 in 2005 at age 5, when he was still a tow-headed, playful little boy. Monson, a 36-year-old nurse from Chippewa Falls, Wis., had started noticing red flags a few years before, like shakiness before meals and frequent bathroom trips, but her pediatrician dismissed her concerns. In the spring after Brendan’s fifth birthday, his symptoms started to intensify – he developed an insatiable thirst and started wetting the bed daily, something he hadn’t done since he was a toddler. Monson sought a second opinion and doctors diagnosed Brendan on the spot. “Right away they whisked us off to the hospital to be trained,” said Monson. It was a traumatizing process, but she and her husband, Todd, kept it together. “In that time as a parent you’re strong for your child. You’re doing everything you can to learn about what’s going on.” Managing Brendan’s diabetes required a major adjustment for the entire family. “Our routine changed," said Monson. "We didn’t have as much flexibility anymore. Brendan couldn’t sleep in. We had to get him up at a certain time. He had to have his insulin at the same time every morning. He had to eat breakfast.” The family faced new challenges when Brendan started kindergarten. He was the only child with diabetes in his elementary school. “It was hard going to school and getting school set up," said Monson. "You have to train the school and get them on board.” Tackling Type 1 During the Teen Years As demanding as tho Continue reading >>

Support Groups | Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Support Groups | Children With Type 1 Diabetes

adminT1 7 Comments Hyperglycaemia , Hypos , Resources , Support Groups , Type 1 Tips If youve just found this page chances are, you are a parent of a child who has recently been diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes and youre looking for advice. Sorry you have to be here but hopefully we can help. Here are some top tips to help you to navigate those first tricky weeks. The So this week it finally happened. Our first Type 1 Teen Trauma. Technically hes 12 so not a Teen yet but Jack started secondary school in September and our lives have changed seemingly overnight. Being an active member in the support groups for parents of Type 1 Children on Facebook, I knew it was only adminT1 0 Comment Blood Glucose Control , Honeymoon Period , Injections , Support Groups , Type 1 Diabetes Studies Insulin Pump VS MDI.Which insulin regime gives the best control to children living with Type 1 Diabetes? Our study compares HBA1C results in the 2 groups. Its a dilemma for many parents of children with Type 1 Diabetes, at some point in their journey, do they move from Multiple Daily Injections to an Insulin Pump. Continue reading >>

Resources For Parents, Teens, And Young Adults

Resources For Parents, Teens, And Young Adults

Printed resources, support groups, and online forums can provide useful information and support at an often-stressful time of life. TRANSITIONS From Pediatric to Adult Health Care The National Diabetes Education Program has put together a number of materials to ease the transition from pediatric to adult care for teens with diabetes. Among them are a transition planning checklist, fill-in form summarizing a teen’s health status to be prepared by the pediatric team for the new adult care provider, and links to a wide variety of resources. To order NDEP publications by phone, call (888) 693-NDEP (6337). THE 411 ON DISABILITY DISCLOSURE A Workbook for Youth with Disabilities www.ncwd-youth.info/411-on-disability-disclosure National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability/Youth This downloadable workbook offers students and young adults with disabilities the opportunity to think about whether, when, and how to disclose a disability. Rather than tell them what to do, the workbook offers information and poses questions to help readers explore their personal attitudes and needs, as well as their options to disclose — or not — in various settings. STUDENTS WITH DIABETES www.studentswithdiabetes.com This is a growing network of support and interaction for young adults on college and university campuses. Check the Web site to see whether your student’s school has a chapter. If not, suggest that one be started! Type One Nationa This online support network sponsored by the JDRF has numerous groups for young people with Type 1 diabetes, teens, college students, and young adults, as well as a group for parents of teens. ADULTS LIVING WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES American Diabetes Association Community The ADA’s online community boards provides a forum for adults with Type 1 diabe Continue reading >>

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Sometimes a person with diabetes can feel very alone and “different.” Support groups are important and helpful to people with diabetes, because they provide a venue to meet others who share similar medical and psychosocial concerns, according to Marilyn Ritholz, Ph.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist, at Joslin Diabetes Center. By meeting with others who have diabetes, you can feel that the members of the group can understand your experience firsthand. By sharing their experiences, group members can feel part of a community and gain a greater sense of value and power from this feeling of belonging. Diabetes Support Groups at Joslin Joslin offers different types of diabetes support groups. Some of these groups include: Women’s Diabetes Support Group- “We have found that women of different ages are facing specific issues. Therefore, the group provides a venue for discussion of particular concerns for women with diabetes,” Ritholz says. For example, Joslin is now running a women’s group for ages 21-35 years old that have type 1 diabetes and are facing concerns regarding diabetes management, acceptance of diabetes, relationships, and consideration of pregnancy. Couples Support Group- These groups only meet once and have couples share concerns and discuss what it’s like to live with diabetes in a relationship. “Both the person with diabetes and the significant other get support and understanding of diabetes from different perspectives.” Joslin offers other diabetes support groups, such as coping with diabetes, men’s age-based support groups, young and middle-aged women’s diabetes support group, and a Latino support group. There are also support groups available for children with diabetes and their parents. Each program includes supervised group activities f Continue reading >>

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