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Type 1 Diabetes Supplies

Moms Best Diabetes Supply Tips And Tricks

Moms Best Diabetes Supply Tips And Tricks

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney Moms Best Diabetes Supply Tips and Tricks The steady stream of stuff diabetes care requires can seem endless! From ordering to organizing to upcycling leftovers, six moms share ideas for managing their stash. I use the plastic test strip vials for art supply storage. Theyre great for keeping tiny beads and sequins under control. Ive even used them as glitter shakers by filling the vials with glitter and then poking holes in the lid with a thick sewing needle so the sparkly stuff shakes out a little at a time. Janet, Tulsa, Okla., mom of an 8-year-old daughter After my son Jake was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I couldnt help but notice the amount of waste that came along with managing it insulin syringe caps, test strips, test strip canisters, pump cartridges and more! Right from the beginning, I saved glucometer computer chips and the rest of the garbage to potentially make into something more valuable. Once we got in the groove of managing Jakes diabetes, I began making the landfill-bound beauties into jewelry to sell and giving 100 percent of the profit to the JDRF for type 1 diabetes research. -Jen, Washington, D.C., mom of a 3-year-old son Using a mail-order service to purchase ninety days worth of diabetes supplies has saved me so much time, since theres no more waiting in line. Plus, I save gas by not having to drive to and from the pharmacy every few weeks. They even send the insulin in cool packs, which gives me peace of mind. -Lauren, Marfa, Texas, mom of a 4-year-old son Discarded plastic test-strip vials are great for geocaching a treasure-hunting game where you use a GPS to hide and seek containers with other players. My son loves it! The vials are durable enough to withstand the weather all year round, and theyr Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In The Workplace

Type 1 Diabetes In The Workplace

Living with type 1 diabetes is a full time job; a full time job that doesn't provide a paycheck. Even worse, having a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes oftentimes makes it extremely difficult to work full time or to even secure a job that offers insurance. The scary fact is a lot of people who actually need insurance don't get it (because they are constantly denied coverage) and living with type 1 diabetes is very expensive. As noted on the American Diabetes Association website, "People with diagnosed diabetes incur average medical expenditures of about $13,700 per year, of which about $7,900 is attributed to diabetes. People with diagnosed diabetes, on average, have medical expenditures approximately 2.3 times higher than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes." Our brilliant co-founder Erin Williams came up with a list of resources for you to use if you are struggling to pay for your prescriptions. There are a couple of ways to begin this process; you can connect with a Patient Assistance Program or work with a doctor to contact one of the drug companies directly. Either process will take a little time, a little paperwork but it's worth it to make sure you get the medications you deserve without going in to debt! There is help available for type 1 diabetics who can't afford their supplies and prescriptions. These programs, frequently called Patient Assistance Programs (or PAPs for short), are designed to help those in need obtain their medicines at little to no cost. This is a great article that explains how PAPs work: "Pharmaceutical Companies Helping Patients Get Their Medicines" by Richard J. Sagall, M.D. (article located here and here) If you need help finding a Patient Assistance Program, or you're just not quite sure where to begin looking, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

What it is First of all, let's define diabetes. When you have a meal or a snack, some of the foods you eat - called carbohydrates - break down into sugar and go into your bloodstream. Think of your bloodstream as your highway system, and the blood sugar needs to travel where it is needed - your muscles, all of your organs, everywhere it can be used for energy. However, the sugar needs to be transported, or carried, and what carries it to its many destinations is insulin. So think of insulin as your UPS, FedEx or Post Office carrier. It is made by the pancreas, which sits right by the stomach. When things are normal, the pancreas makes the right amount of insulin all of the time, and blood sugar levels stay in the normal range. However, without insulin, the sugar just sits in the bloodstream, and the level of sugar goes higher and higher. This is type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes accounts for only 5 - 10 percent of all cases, and used to be called juvenile diabetes. Three-quarters of people who develop type 1 are under the age of 18, and most others are under 40 years old, but older adults develop it as well. Many people think of type 1 diabetes as the more serious kind, because injecting insulin is the only treatment, but its type 2 counterpart can lead to the same long-term problems we all want to prevent. Another common distinction between the two forms of diabetes is the lack of insulin resistance in persons with type 1; in fact, most people with type 1 diabetes are quite sensitive to insulin and require smaller doses. However, overweight and obese people often experience insulin resistance, regardless of their form of diabetes. What causes it The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Most experts believe it is an autoimmune disorder, which is a condition that oc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

Diabetes Programs And Supplies

For diabetic patients who need financial assistance with supplies and related health care items and services, the following programs may be of help. Please note that applications must be submitted to the programs and not to PPA® . Categories Insulin Access Programs Blink Health is working with Eli Lilly and Company to offer a 40 percent discount on Lilly insulins. The Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program delivers the 40 percent discount directly to patients and will be honored at over 67,000 local pharmacies nationwide. Anyone can participate in the Blink Health Insulin Patient Access Program via the Blink Health mobile app (available for iOS & Android) or website, www.blinkhealth.com, which has no membership fees or monthly premiums. Patients enter the form, dosage and quantity of the Lilly insulin that matches their prescription. The discount will be automatically applied. Payments are made online and the prescriptions can be picked up at virtually any U.S. pharmacy, including: Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Target, RiteAid, Safeway and Kroger. People using federal government programs are not eligible. Purchases are fully refundable. Assistance: Insulin Free Glucose Meters Abbott Diabetes Care provides free blood glucose monitoring system kits to those with diabetes. Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 USA Tel: 888-522-5226 Fax: 202-337-8314 Email: [email protected] Assistance: Free Glucose Meters Test Strips Roche Diagnostics, the maker of ACCU-CHEK® Products provides a limited supply of ACCU-CHEK Aviva test strips to a network of community clinics and health centers throughout the U.S. to distribute to their low-income and uninsured patients with diabetes. Roache Diagnostics Corporation 9115 Hague Road Indianapolis, IN 46250 Phone: 800 Continue reading >>

Being A Diabetes Medical Supply Hoarder

Being A Diabetes Medical Supply Hoarder

My name is Mindy Bartleson and Im a self-diagnosed (former) diabetes supply hoarder. (Im not using this term in a joking manner either.)I would like to note former because Im finally at a point where I dont feel the need to hoard supplies now because I have switched health insurance. But it wasnt always this way. For a long time, I was in survival mode; I never feltsecure in terms of my health and access to supplies. When I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age7, I was lucky to have good health insurance. All that changed though when my dad passed away when I was12. Before his passing, alot was done to make sure I at least had health insurance, because at that time, having a pre-existing condition meant that I basically wasnt eligible for insurance on my own. (I was very aware of this at a young age.) Because the health insurance I had barely covered what they considered to be the essentials, it was a struggle to get anything else covered, so I appliedto get assistance through Childrens Medical Services.Thishelped with copays, meeting deductibles, a pump, a CGM, getting enough supplies, and with other appointments that my insurance didnt cover.But that ended when I was 21, and what a shock (not really) that there werenta ton of resources for the 20-something right out of college. With the help of my doctor and friends who would give me left over supplies or refer me to assistance programs, I hoarded to feel safe.My doctor would prescribe 2-3 times more supplies than I needed. Before the CGM, I would checkabout 8-10 times per day, but my script would say 12-16. If mydailyinsulin total was 30-50, my script would say 60 or more. I ordered extra boxes of supplies. So instead of getting 3 boxes of pump supplies every month, I would get 4 or 5. Thisapplied to things like Continue reading >>

Top Must Have Diabetes Supplies

Top Must Have Diabetes Supplies

Whether you found your way here as a veteran in the #DLIFE, or you are newly diagnosed, one thing always remains constant, diabetes no matter the stage can be challenging. While the challenges are always there, I will say this, it does get easier. Living a life with diabetes will give you exactly what you put into it. For those like myself who learn better when provided a visual clue think of it like this: A car takes gas to work. When you fill the gas tank up, that car will take you wherever you want to go. What happens though when you try to drive the car with no gas at all, when you neglect filling it back up with gas after you used what was in there? Its not going to go anywhere. In terms of diabetes management , if you take the information and training your medical team has given you and simply neglect the care of your diabetes, what happens to your body? Your mind? You cant run on empty, just like the car. Learning to manage your diabetes doesnt have to be tough. Instead of neglecting your care, taking the information your medical team provided you with is the first step. Learning how to process the information youve received is the next. The final step in management is putting everything to use, discovering your role and living. Part of diabetes management is learning which types of products work best for you. Everyone is different so the products that your doctor initially recommends might not be the best fit. As you move forward in your diabetes care and management youll learn which are best. Below youll find a list of some of the more common types of diabetes management products, that are not typically covered by insurance . (Disclaimer: Everyones insurance is different, so check first before you purchase any of the items on the list, if your insurance covers Continue reading >>

Emergency Preparedness For Type 1 Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness For Type 1 Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness for Type 1 Diabetes From the wrath of Hurricane Sandy along the eastern seaboard to devastating wildfires in the west, the past two years have shattered previous records for natural disaster destruction in the United States. The hardships and chaos these catastrophes cause are difficult enough. But factor in the added demands of managing type 1 diabetes (T1D), and a bad situation can get much worse. No matter where you live, you should have a plan for taking care of yourself and your diabetes in an emergency situation. Kim Kaar lives in southeastern Connecticut with her husband Marko and their three childrenEmily, 18, Gabriel, 10, and Alex, 14, who was diagnosed with T1D at eighteen months of age. Just blocks from Long Island Sound in one direction, and the Connecticut River in the other, the Kaar family has ridden out their fair share of storms over the years. Possessing a mentality of always be prepared has made it fairly easy to keep type 1 diabetes care consistent, Kim explains. Despite the challenges of two hurricanes and a major blizzard over the past two years, advance planning and a well-stocked diabetes emergency kit has kept Alexs T1D safely in check through flooding and extended electrical power loss. But the Kaars may be in the minority. Even though it is something that I always talk to them about, before Superstorm Sandy hit last year, most of my patients did not have realistic emergency plans in place, laments New York-based diabetes educator Susan Weiner, RD, MS, CDE. People just dont think it will happen to themuntil it happens to them. Organization and checklists are key to making it through an emergency, according to Mrs. Weiner, author of the upcoming book The Complete Diabetes Organizer (Spry Publishing, Fall 2013). Think thro Continue reading >>

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

Do You Have Extra Diabetes Supplies You No Longer Need?

By Nicole Kofman and Kelly Close Twitter Summary: Learn how you can donate your unused diabetes supplies to help save peoples lives around the world: donate at this link. Before insulin was discovered in 1921, a diabetes diagnosis was often a death sentence. Nearly 100 years later, it still is in many places on our planet. This is particularly true in less developed parts of the world, where hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes don’t have access to the most basic life-saving resources that we often take for granted: insulin, strips, and meters. There are several organizations dedicated to bringing these resources to people across the world with diabetes – Life for a Child, Insulin for Life, Team Type 1 Foundation, and Marjorie’s Fund are just a few. We were fortunate to sit down recently with Dr. Mark and Carol Atkinson, President and Director of Insulin For Life USA (IFL USA), to learn more about their work and how people can get involved. We hugely support the work of IFL USA, which gathers unused diabetes supplies from the U.S. and sends them, free of charge, to people in need in disadvantaged regions. You can learn how to donate your unused supplies (insulin, strips, and more) at this link, and read below why and how IFL USA came to be. What amazing efforts the Atkinsons are making – and this is in addition to all that Dr. Atkinson is already doing at the University of Florida and with the nPOD Program. The Problem As Dr. Atkinson outlined in a recent highly praised piece published in the research journal The Lancet, there are several barriers to accessing diabetes supplies, including: High cost of insulin and blood glucose test strips; Insufficient health system resources applied to diabetes; Lack of diabetes education; and Lack of home refrigerati Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Spend $1,000 A Month Taking Care Of Themselves — And It's Not Just Because Of Insulin

Diabetics Can Spend $1,000 A Month Taking Care Of Themselves — And It's Not Just Because Of Insulin

A paramedic checking the blood sugar levels of a diabetes patient. Beawiharta Beawiharta/Reuters Diabetes, in particular type 1 diabetes, can be an expensive chronic disease to manage. That's being felt as the cost of insulin increases, while at the same time high health insurance deductibles leave families on the hook to cover more of the cost than ever before. It means, in some cases, all the expenses can climb past $1,000 a month. There are two types of diabetes of which nearly 29.1 million Americans have one or the other. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease, in which the body mistakenly kills so-called beta cells that are supposed to make the body's insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food. This kind of diabetes can affect any age group, though it's most often diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. The roughly 1.25 million people in the US who have Type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin to live. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is something that develops either based on genetic or lifestyle choices, and doesn't always require that you need to take insulin. But insulin isn't the only thing type 1 diabetics have to keep track of. There are a lot of supplies that come with the diagnosis: there are test strips, which help monitor blood sugar levels there are lancets that are used to draw the blood, not to mention alcohol swabs to clean the area where injections happen. There are also the needles/syringes you need to inject the insulin. There's also a device called glucagon, an emergency drug for diabetics that is kind of like the EpiPen. If a diabetic' blood sugar gets too low and he or she passes out, someone can administer the glucagon to get their blood sugar levels back up to non-emergency levels. Some also choose to use a Continue reading >>

Mostly Type 1 Supplies And Carrying Cases

Mostly Type 1 Supplies And Carrying Cases

Mostly Type 1 Supplies and Carrying Cases Mostly Type 1 Supplies and Carrying Cases Wasn't sure which forum to post this in so Type 1 it is for now.... Anyone have a good hookup for decent Diabetes supplies carrying cases? I currently have a Medport that carries my insulin, tester (currently the AccuCheck Nano), strips, Symlin, couple syringes, glucose or sugar, finger stabber and extra batteries. It does the job okay but I would like something a little slimmer. This is the way it sits now: See how the front has that pocket? The pocket is bulky so I'm forced to use a bigger purse. Nowadays, we don't need to be so concerned about adding a cold pack (longer travel maybe) but for everyday usage? Having a hard time finding a slimmer carrying case. This one isn't bad, just....awkward. Haven't found anything I really like, so use a ziplock sandwich bag. I also move strips from my round Accu container to a flat RelyOn container (and relabeled it). If I go on a daytrip I often just pre-load my basal insulin in a syringe or two. T2, self diagnosed 2007. On Levemir, Regular, and Humalog. 3 bouts of retinopathy, hence I keep A1C on the low side. So far so good. ..lol Ziplock sounds funny but not a bad idea! My issue with that is I need something not clear because I don't want to advertise. Like "Hey look at me! Going to shoot up again!" I have a small Kelty daypack that I use on trips. I like it a lot. I use a small fanny pack too for snacks. I keep an ice block in it on hot days to keep my chocolate snacks "good". I like ziplocks! The add that water proof-ability in the rain. When I ride my bike, I love wearing a cycling jersey with pockets on the back. I kind of wish I could wear one all the time because those back shirt pockets are perfect for the D stuff that I haul. The only Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Supplies Needed In Uganda

Type 1 Diabetes Supplies Needed In Uganda

TYPE 1 DIABETES SUPPLIES NEEDED IN UGANDA We could not have done this year without the love, prayer, and support of all of you. You have truly carried us through a hard season! We werent expecting all the delays that we had with June Bugs adoption, as in things taking about four times longer than expected, and because of it, we are running low on medical supplies. I even took my Dexcom out of my arms because we are so low on sensors that we wont have enough for both June Bug and I till we get home, and its more important for her to have one than for me. We have brought or had someone bring over supplies several times now since nothing is available here and we are nearing the end of what we have left! Because our bodies rely on these things to stay alive every single day, its fairly urgent that we replenish our nearly depleted stock. Tomorrow is 11 months since the day I ended up in a coma and was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Two and a half months later, June Bug joined our family who had just been diagnosed with Type 1 as well. In case you missed the whole story, you can read my diagnosis story {HERE} and about how June Bug joined our family {HERE} . Between the two of us, we have pricked our fingers and tested our blood sugar over 4000 times. And we have given ourselves over 3300 injections. In 11 MONTHS! Some days I cant believe its already been almost a year since I was diagnosed, and other days I feel like Ive had it forever and have forgotten what life is like prior to diagnosis. I have forgotten what its like to just grab a snack from the fridge and run out the door, or to leave the house without a purse full of supplies, or what its like to sleep a solid night without dexcom alarms going off and nightly blood sugar checks. I have forgotten what its like to or Continue reading >>

Providing Free Supplies To Low-income Families Improves Type 1 Diabetes

Providing Free Supplies To Low-income Families Improves Type 1 Diabetes

Providing free supplies to low-income families improves type 1 diabetes CHICAGO--Providing free supplies of insulin and blood glucose test trips to families with type 1 diabetes in low- and lower-middle income families can result in improved blood-sugar control and diabetes-related knowledge, a new study of families in India suggests. The research results will be presented Tuesday, March 20, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill. In Indian families with type 1 diabetes, the cost of care is largely borne by the family, with the highest economic burden borne by the lower and lower middle socio-economic class families, said lead researcher Vijayalakshmi Bhatia, M.D., professor at Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences in Lucknow, India. "Paucity of financial resources may result in inadequate spending on diabetes, which in turn can have an adverse effect on healthcare outcomes," she said. For a condition like diabetes, where self-management is the key to controlling the disease, other social factors such as education status, urban or rural dwelling and access to healthcare facilities, among others, may impede a good outcome, despite provision of insulin and other supplies, Bhatia said. The researchers studied, for the first time in India, the effect on blood sugar levels and diabetes-related knowledge of reducing the cost-related barrier, by providing free insulin and blood glucose test strips to 85 patients (average age 13 years) from low- and middle-income families for one year. Additionally, in the second six months of the study, half the patients received phone calls from a diabetes nurse educator every two weeks. The study found a significant improvement in hemoglobin A1c, a test that measures blood sugar co Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage State Laws and Programs Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws and Programs This is a policymaker and consumer guide to state insurance mandated coverage, Medicaid coverage and state-sponsored diabetes programs. It was published 2011and updated material was added January 2016 All state law diabetes mandates and minimum coverage requirements for state-regulated health insurance policies. The tables include the enacted state laws passedsince the firstmandates inCalifornia (1981) and New York (1993). Use links below to go directly to state-based information: State Medicaid diabetes coverage terms and conditions. All Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) diabetes coverage. Contact information and an overview of federal funding provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to state-sponsored diabetes prevention and control programs (DPCPs). DPCPs represent the front line in battling diabetes in most states. An overview of other state activities and initiatives, such as creation of diabetes coordinator positions in the executive branch to fight diabetes. Federal Health Reform.The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed March 2010, has led to changed and expanded coverage termed "EssentialHealth Benefits." Newly Released: NCSL Survey:Diabetes Drug coverage: A new survey of2016 Insurance Plans in 50 states, examining 1) patient access to the scores of diabetes drug treatments and2) results in the 46 states with laws mandating or offering diabetes coverage. NCSL original research, published summer 2016. [Read the report] December 2015: " Diabetes: Addressing the Costs; A 50-State Budget Survey for FY 2014 ." NCSL released its latest diabetes report, taking a closer look at programs and budget appropriations that play a role in con Continue reading >>

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

How costly is diabetes management and treatment? Diabetes management and treatment is expensive. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the average cost of health care for a person with diabetes is $13,741 a year—more than twice the cost of health care for a person without diabetes.1 Many people who have diabetes need help paying for their care. For those who qualify, a variety of government and nongovernment programs can help cover health care expenses. This publication is meant to help people with diabetes and their family members find and access such resources. 1American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033–1046. What is health insurance? Health insurance helps pay for medical care, including the cost of diabetes care. Health insurance options include the following: private health insurance, which includes group and individual health insurance government health insurance, such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), TRICARE, and veterans’ health care programs Starting in 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prevents insurers from denying coverage or charging higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions, such as diabetes. The ACA also requires most people to have health insurance or pay a fee. Some people may be exempt from this fee. Read more about the ACA at HealthCare.gov or call 1–800–318–2596, TTY 1–855–889–4325. Key Terms Some terms listed here have many meanings; only those meanings that relate to the financial and medical aspects of diabetes and its management and treatment are included. affiliation period: a period of time that must pass before health insurance coverage provided by a health maintenance organization (HMO) be Continue reading >>

Saving Money On Your Diabetes Care

Saving Money On Your Diabetes Care

Even when money is tight, taking care of your health is a priority. Follow these money-saving tips to keep medical costs and your type 1 diabetes under control. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . If you have type 1 diabetes , you know that managing the disease can take a big bite out of a budget. Test strips, insulin, and other diabetes supplies can add up to thousands of dollars a year. In tight economic times, the cost of diabetes care can seem overwhelming. But there are many money-saving tips that can help. In some cases, all you need to do is ask. If you are struggling to afford your drugs or supplies, you should turn to your diabetes educator, says Barbara Chase, MSN, CDE, diabetes management program coordinator at Massachusetts General Hospitals Chelsea Health Center. Your diabetes educator and medical team can work with you to determine all the options for saving money and what is best for your particular circumstances, she says. Here are some money-saving tips to try right away: Understand your diabetes. In my opinion, the best way to save money is education, Chase says. Correct timing (of food and blood sugar testing ), portions, and choices make diabetes control less complicated. People with type 1 diabetes need to learn how to count carbohydrates and balance insulin with food intake and exercise, she says, adding, Knowing when to use test strips and what the results mean can cut down on the need for testing. Avoid unneeded expenses. Patients with diabetes often purchase unnecessary gimmicks, Chase says. Usually, with the exception of diet soda and artificial sweeteners, special diabetic food is not needed, she explains. Chase Continue reading >>

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