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Type 1 Diabetes Success Stories

Type 1 Diabetes No Match For Primal Lifestyle!

Type 1 Diabetes No Match For Primal Lifestyle!

Type 1 Diabetes No Match for Primal Lifestyle! Its Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Marks Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Marks Daily Apple community please contact me here . Ill continue to publish these each Friday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading! My name is Shawn and I am 28 years old. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about a year ago. I havent seen many stories or articles related to diabetes on the MDA website so I thought I would share how going Primal has helped me take back control over my health and wellbeing. First of all, I have actually been very healthy most of my life (or so I thought). In college I lifted weights, ran, and did pushups and sit-ups in my dorm room on a regular basis. I despised salad and fresh veggies, and loaded up on Hamburger Helper, cereal, and PB&J because it was convenient and I worked it all off during my workouts. I am 6 tall and my weight maxed out at about 205 lbs (92 kgs) during my last year of college (2007)perfectly healthy I thought. Fast forward several years (during which I managed to drop about 10 lbs thanks to army basic training) to September of 2011. I started losing weightlots of weightabout 25 lbs in 3 weeks to be exact, I drank water by the gallons, and I could no longer exercise without getting severe cramping in my legs. Something was obviously wrong, so I made an appointment with my doctor who I hadnt seen in about 10 years. I had a fasting blood sugar level of 350 ( normal is 70-99 mg/dL ). The last several months of 2011 were very challenging. There was no explanation why I got this disease (no family history) and trying to come to terms with the fact that I would have to de Continue reading >>

Parents Talking Type 1: Milas Story

Parents Talking Type 1: Milas Story

Posted on August 13, 2013 by American Diabetes Association My name is Mila Ferrer. I am the mother of three boys and I live in Miami, Fla. Seven years ago, type 1 diabetes knocked on the door of our home. Since Friday, June 2, 2006, it has become part of our family. My relationship with it is completely personal and very close to my heart. Our youngest son, Jaime, three years old at the time, started to show typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes, which we failed to recognize. After being potty trained, Jaime started to wet the bed, the car seat and even the floor. He was constantly thirsty, was moody, had poor appetite and had lost weight. What did we think was occurring to Jaime? We thought that maybe he was going through some stage in his toddler years. It wasnt until my mother-in-law commented that something was different in Jaimehe looked thinner and had baggy eyesthat we realized that something was not right. Immediately, my husband and I looked at each other and decided to call the pediatrician. I will never forget that conversation with the pediatrician, when we explained the changes that we had observed in Jaime. She told me: Mila, I hope that I am wrong, but all those changes in Jaimes behavior are signs of diabetes mellitus type 1. She asked us to take Jaime for a blood glucose test. We took him to urgent care for the test. The result of 589 mg/dl confirmed what our pediatrician had already suspected. All those symptoms that my son had displayed were the first signs of type 1 diabetes, caused by little or no insulin production from his pancreas. As a mother, when I received Jaimes medical diagnosis, I felt the world come over me. I felt helpless, powerless, full of disbelief. I thought that the medical diagnosis was wrong, that someone would walk into the hospi Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise: Success Story

Diabetes And Exercise: Success Story

Ready to get fit? Its good for your diabetes , burns off stress, and makes you feel good. Once it becomes a habit, you might be surprised to find that you look forward to your workouts! First, check in with your doctor to find out if you should avoid any activities. You might be able to do more than you think you can. Once your doctor gives you the green light, your choices are wide open. What activities sound like fun? Pick something youll enjoy. Check your blood sugar , also called glucose, before and after exercise . "It's a motivation tool," says Jacqueline Shahar, a clinical exercise physiologist at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. When you exercise and see your blood glucose improve, you'll probably do more because it's going in the right direction." In time, your doctor might be able to lower your insulin or diabetes medications . You should still check that your blood sugar isn't too high or too low. Keep snacks on hand for low blood sugar . Be prepared. Bring fast-acting snacks to the gym or on your outdoor workout in case your blood sugar drops too low while you're exercising . Wear comfortable shoes. Good shoes will help you avoid foot problems, which can be more serious when you have diabetes. They should be appropriate for your activity. When in doubt, ask your doctor. Wear a diabetes ID. Wear a bracelet or necklace, or carry something that says you have diabetes. It should list an emergency contact and say whether you take insulin . Jennifer Auyer of Nashua, N.H., knows what thats like. Between her job and her family, there wasnt an easy spot on her schedule for working out. Her father became her reason to do it anyway. Auyers dad had many health problems related to type 2 diabetes , including heart disease , a foot amputation , and vision problems. Continue reading >>

Whole30 Success Story: Rob H. And Type-1 Diabetes

Whole30 Success Story: Rob H. And Type-1 Diabetes

Whole30 Success Story: Rob H. and Type-1 Diabetes From Melissa Hartwig, Whole30 headmistress I first readabout Rob Howes Whole30 results on Instagram ( @robhowe21 ). Rob, a type-1 diabetic,posted a photo of his fasting blood sugar (a little high on Day 1 of his third Whole30), but shared the results from his first two programs; he reduced his basal insulin by 60%, reduced his bolus insulin to near zero, and lowered his Hg a1C by .5. I outreached to him right then and there, and invited him to share his story on our blog. He responded with the following background information: Ive been a Type-1 Diabetic since I was 16. I was a college and a pro basketball player, so when I was younger, my diet didnt matter as much because I was working out all the time. When I was done (playing), I started working at a desk and living a more sedentary lifestyle like most people. In the summer of 2014, two of my friends started doing the Whole30 and had great results. I had lunch with my parents and mentioned it, and they immediately started doing it too! (Theyve been living about 90% Whole30-compliant ever since; theyre currently in the middle of their fifth full Whole30.) I saw what amazing results they had, so I had to try it for myself. I couldnt have been happier with the results. I felt better, had great energy, slept better, and lost the extraweight I had picked up. But the biggest difference was in my diabetes. I lowered my hemoglobin a1c from 7 to 6.5 (which is awesome), and I did it while reducing my basal insulin consumption about 50% and completely eliminating bolus insulin! I was literally consuming about 200% less insulin and getting better numbers.] Fast-forward to today, in the middle of my third Whole30, and Im seeing better results than ever. Ive also recently started a Continue reading >>

Success Stories - Cured Type 1 Diabetics - Type 1 Alternative

Success Stories - Cured Type 1 Diabetics - Type 1 Alternative

My first couple posts outlined my story as a type 1 diabetic (T1D) and my daily diet that has helped me stay off of medication for over two years. A natural progression for my next blog would be to list the key resources that I used to educate myself on natural alternatives to fight this disease and illustrate multiplecases of cured T1Ds. Over the course of the past two years I have read many books and watched a number of great documentaries. For this post, Im going to focus on the two key resources that essentially changed my life and provided the education and inspiration necessary for me to manage this disease medication free. Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days This documentary was the first major step in understanding how to manage Type 1 diabeteswith no medication. This film is truly inspiring for not only diabetics throughout the world, but for anyone looking to fight diseases naturally. The film starts off with all sorts of fun facts like 1) the cases of Type 2 diabetes has tripled in the past 10 years; 2) the US is one of the sickest countries in the world; and 3) we currently have the most overweight population in the history of the human race. The genesis of the documentary was to follow 6 Americans with diabetes through a 30 day journey to cure their disease through purely a raw natural food diet. Like most diabetics, all 6 subjects prior to the documentary had been advised by their doctors to pump themselves full of medication with zero guidance on how a raw plant-based diet could essentially cure their disease. This was exactly the rhetoric I heard from my doctors when I first was diagnosed, as well. The subjects all attended a clinic at the Tree of Life Center in Patagonia, Arizona which is led by Dr. Gabriel Cousins.Of the 6 diabetics in the film, Continue reading >>

Stories & Experiences

Stories & Experiences

During National Diabetes Week July 12-18, we are asking people to share your stories about diabetes. You can post on our Facebook page or email [email protected] Below are a couple of stories that we have already collected: AFL player, living with type 1 diabetes Jack Fitzpatrick is living proof that you can achieve anything you want when living with diabetes. The 24-year old forward/ruckman for the Melbourne Football Club was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in June 2012, two weeks shy of his 21st birthday. The two metre tall man dubbed ‘The Fitz’ made his AFL debut in 2011. He believes that living with type 1 diabetes is an “interesting challenge” but that the right attitude and, in his case, playing footy help to lead a normal life. "It gives you something to look forward to and you don't wallow in self-pity,” says the Demons player. He checks his blood glucose levels during every game at quarter time and half time, making sure he doesn’t develop hypoglycaemia (‘hypo’, caused by low blood glucose levels). If left untreated, hypoglycaemia can lead to serious medical problems including loss of consciousness, convulsions or seizures requiring emergency treatment. He often involves his trainers in his diabetes management and jokes that they help keeping him alive. Since changing to a low carb/high fat diet and after a period of adaption, he was able to reduce his insulin intake. He now only injects long-acting insulin at night, instead of having needles at every meal. This has given him greater flexibility in his diabetes management whilst being able to train fully at high intensity, without losing strength. Jack is well aware of being a role-model for young people living with diabetes. “I really enjoy being able to tell them about my story Continue reading >>

Success Story: Diabetes

Success Story: Diabetes

How One Family Used Nutrition to Conquer Type 1 Diabetes Two of the Roman boys have Type 1 diabetes, which is controlled by a carefully monitored diet The idea that Type 2 diabetes can be managed, reversed, and now even cured by diet and lifestyle changes is nothing revolutionary. That has been known for some time, and in many cases, it is incorporated into treatment plans. But what about Type 1 diabetes? Can this disease be managed by diet and lifestyle changes, even to the point of reversing complications and symptoms? We believe that in many cases the answer is, Yes! Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system acts to destroy the bodys own tissues. The damage created by an autoimmune disorder can lead to medical complications and an increased risk for other disorders. The development of an autoimmune disorder is affected partly by genetics and partly by environmental agents that act as triggers to set the damaging immune response in motion. Type 1 diabetes is one of many organ-specific autoimmune diseases with, as yet, an unknown trigger. Type 1 diabetes attacks the pancreas; more specifically the insulin-producing beta cells within the pancreas. Once enough of the beta cells have been destroyed, the body can no longer produce enough insulin to manage blood glucose properly. There are many other organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Celiac Disease (CD) attacks the small intestine. Hashimotos disease and Graves disease attack the thyroid. Multiple sclerosis (MS) attacks the central nervous system. Rheumatoid arthritis primarily attacks the synovial joints. And the list goes on. On Celiac Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and Arthritis Can eating certain foods, or not eating others, really make a difference to your condition? If you have an autoimmune disease and youve Continue reading >>

He’s Lived With Type 1 Diabetes For 71 Year

He’s Lived With Type 1 Diabetes For 71 Year

The life expectancy of type 1 diabetes has always been one of the worries, that myself as a parent to two kids with Type 1 always has in the back of their mind. You read many articles and an overwhelming amount of statistics that say, that type 1 diabetes takes 5-10 years off of someone’s life. How can you swallow those words when you read them right in front of you, as a parent, or as someone who lives with type 1 diabetes? It’s difficult to say the least, but even difficult doesn’t cover it. And then you read stories like those of Mr. Richard Vaughn, who has lived with Type 1 diabetes for 71 years, at the age of 6 years old, the same age, coincidentally as my son was diagnosed. That glimmer of “HOPE” reignites back into your heart. Possibility replaces the worry and fear that once took over you. Understanding exactly what Richard has gone through in terms of diabetes treatment and management over the past 71 years is what really makes his story so amazing. Think about the advancement in medicine throughout this time. Consider the treatment options for Richard and his parents when he was first diagnosed and compare them to the ones available today. Things have changed, and his story is nothing short of remarkable. My two Type 1 kids and I had the honor of meeting him and his wife in the summer of 2015 at the Friends for Life Conference. My son and I actually went to one of the sessions where Richard was speaking because I thought it was very important for my son, who at the time was 11 years old, having lived with Type 1 for 5 years up until that point, to hear this man, defying all the odds and statistics for those with Type 1 diabetes, speak. I think the one thing my son will remember from meeting Richard is that they both had the same pump at the time. I r Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Real Life Stories

Diabetes: Real Life Stories

Tweet This section of Diabetes.co.uk presents real stories from people with diabetes around the world. By understanding other people’s experiences, successes and failures, it is hoped that awareness about living with diabetes can be raised. The most powerful tool in fighting diabetes is information, whether this comes from medical experts or real-life tales from those who live with the disease. We interview a range of people with diabetes and present their real life stories. To feature your own story, please contact us. Diabetes Blogs Keep checking back for more real-life diabetes views and opinions. If you post about diabetes online or run a diabetes blog or web page and would like your blog or story featured, please let us know. Read the official Diabetes Blog. Read the musings of people with diabetes, real life stories and loads more on the blog. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as Continue reading >>

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Today, Caroline Potter from Colorful Eats, has an amazing story of recovery for you. She’s worked with the same nutritionist that I have these last few years, and has been able to treat Type 1 diabetes with a nutrient-dense diet and natural supplements. It’s another encouraging story of how food can play a significant role in our fight against disease! Treating Diabetes with Real Food Life in your 20s seems pretty grand. You feel powerful, youthful and energized. Dreams seem within your reach and challenges seem conquerable. Then out of the blue, college bliss turns into doctors offices and waiting rooms. Countless tests of all forms, vague results and no answers as to what was wrong with me. As I came home from college that winter for Christmas break, I laid on the couch for most of my vacation. I was constantly starving, eating everything in sight but quickly loosing weight. Finally, one day while out to dinner with my family, I broke down in tears because my mouth was so dry, I could barely talk. I was experiencing dry mouth, one of the major symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes? I was 20, a seemingly healthy young girl, who grew up in a home where my mother fed us all organic food. I was the one in school with her carrot sticks and tuna salad sandwiches. I never drank soda or ate Oreos, so the thought of diabetes was never even on my radar. Barely able to walk up a flight of stairs, I checked myself into the ER to discover my blood sugar levels were in a diabetic coma range. Later the next morning, the doctor diagnosed me with type 1 diabetes. I was scared, hopeless and confused. The days that followed were difficult to say the least. I still felt sick all the time, gained over 20 pounds in 2 weeks and felt terribly alone. My legs turned black and blue from giving mys Continue reading >>

5 Ways People With Diabetes Are More Successful

5 Ways People With Diabetes Are More Successful

5 Ways People with Diabetes Are More Successful A corporate speaker shares life lessons everyone can learn from people with Type 1 diabetes. When Im not taking care of a child with Type 1 diabetes, Im a corporate speaker for the Energy Project. The projects purpose is to partner with organizations to create workplaces that are healthier, happier, more focused and more purposeful. I strive to help people become more accountable for their own happiness and the success of their organizations. To teach this personal accountability, I often draw upon my experience in interacting with the Type 1 diabetes community. What is both a blessing and a curse about Type 1 is that there is such an advantage in being personally responsible for ones own health on a day-to-day basis. While this can create untold stress, it also can instill qualities in people with Type 1 that would be an asset to any organization. Here are some 5 simple, powerful behaviors that those with Type 1 diabetes, including my son, have taught me: Accountability: If you think youre responsible for the good things that happen in your life, then you also need to take responsibility for the negative aspects. Low and high blood sugars happen, but its up to the individual with Type 1 to determine what to do about them. No Excuses: Many of those with Type 1 have a powerful mindset about their condition. Kelli Kuehne, former LPGA golfer with Type 1, sums it up: Diabetes is a condition, its not an excuse. Theres only so long a successful person with Type 1 can blame shortcomings on a non-functioning pancreas. Self-management: Good self-management means you have determined what behaviors need to show up most consistently so that youve made them automatic. Diabetes is exhausting, so successful people with Type 1 have boile Continue reading >>

Success Story – The Paleo Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

Success Story – The Paleo Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

Dear Readers, The following post is a testimonial from a mother who’s child was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes last year, and who has seen a significant improvement in her condition after adopting the Paleo Diet. We encourage all our readers to share their success stories using the Paleo Diet with us. I have a most remarkable story! On September 10, 2009, I took my six year old daughter to the pediatrician for what I thought was a urinary tract infection. She had been very thirsty and going to the bathroom excessively. Little did I know that these were symptoms of hyperglycemia! Her BG was tested a 542 in the doctor’s office, and she spent 2 days in the hospital. During that time she was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Her A1c was 10.8. Her IA-2 Ab was strongly positive, with borderline positive insulin Ab, but she had negative GAD-65 and ICA. This is consistent with Type 1 Diabetes. They sent us home to begin a regimen of insulin injections; one basal in the evening, and one before each meal. We did what any parent would do which is: what the doctors told us. However, after a week or so, we realized we were counting carbohydrates in things like pop tarts. It seems absurd. We decided that all of us needed to clean up our diets. Since we worked out in a Crossfit gym, the diet that came to mind was the Paleo Diet. What happened next is amazing! My daughter’s insulin needs PLUMMETED. Over the next week we made numerous calls to the Endocrinologist to adjust her dosages downward. After about two weeks, she was completely off of insulin! That was roughly October 1st, 2009. She has continued with BG testing, endocrinologist visits, and the Paleo Diet, and as of this day (January 31, 2010) she has close to normal BG and requires no insulin. At her last Doctor visit (late Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Delivery: A Story Of Success

Diabetes And Delivery: A Story Of Success

Pregnancy and diabetes are each difficult on their own. Put them together and you have two full time jobs. If you haven’t been following, I’ve been writing about my pregnancy with diabetes for ASweetLife (see here, here, and here), and now, after a long nine months, I can tell you not only about diabetes and pregnancy, but also about diabetes and delivery. During my final month of pregnancy, I was chronically sweating. I passed the time gulping cold water, opening windows, and using my hand as a fan. Never mind it was winter. In my 40th week, I had brunch at a restaurant and asked the waiter to turn down the heat. He smiled and told me the heat wasn’t on. That’s how I knew: The Girl was coming. A day later – two days before my due date – I was in labor. By the middle of the night, my contractions had progressed to five minutes apart. It was time to go to the hospital. But my husband Gary and I couldn’t leave yet. First, I needed to review my checklist of things I’d need for diabetes and delivery. The list had been sitting on top of my packed suitcase for two weeks. In the margin I had written: DIABETES AND DELIVERY REMINDERS CHANGE PUMP SITE BEFORE GOING TO HOSPITAL!!!!!!!! INSERT ON RIGHT HIP!!!!!!!! DOUBLE CHECK THAT YOU HAVE ALL DIABETES SUPPLIES + TAKE INSULIN FROM FRIDGE!!!!!!!! All I could see were messy capital letters and an inappropriate amount of exclamation points. I thought to myself, CRAP. I have to change my site. Now? When I had made that checklist, I’d predicted my hospital stay would likely last three days – the duration of one pump site change, which meant I could change my site right before going to the hospital, and then again when I returned home. All of this calculating was done in order to avoid having to change my site in the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Success Stories

Diabetes Success Stories

"Within days I stopped taking Metformin and Januvia as my levels were so good" "Food and fitness is the world's best medicine" "Within three months of starting a well-formulated ketogenic diet, all flares were gone!" After one year of low carb: "I am 70 years old today and have never felt better" Long-term weight loss on keto: Maintaining a 'noexcuses' attitude How Abby lost 65 pounds and reversed prediabetes How do you break through a stall? Calvins weight-loss experiment How a thin person with diabetes reversed her type 2 diabetes Reversing type 2 diabetes in only 2.5 months with keto and fasting The keto diet: "I have come back from the dead" "Keto is now a lifestyle and not a diet" How Leonie successfully manages type 1 diabetes Bye bye binge eating! How Abi lost 70 pounds on low carb The keto diet: From hungry and exhausted to satiated and energetic Type 2 diabetes reversal and 100 pounds lost in only 10 months! The keto diet: Reversing type 2 diabetes What does living low carb look like? Chris Hannaway shares his success story, takes us for a spin in the gym and orders food at the local pub. A low-carb story with Dr. Sanjeev Balakrishnan How can you as a doctor treat patients with type 2 diabetes? Dr. Sanjeev Balakrishnan learned the answer to this question seven years ago. Check out this video for all the details! After living somewhat of a high-carb life and then living in France for a few years enjoying croissants and freshly baked baguettes, Marc was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Yvonne used to see all those pictures of people who'd lost so much weight, but sometimes didn't really believe they were real. When Kenneth turned 50, he realized that he wouldn't make it to 60 the way he was going. John used to suffer from a myriad of aches and pains which he simp Continue reading >>

Another Type One Diabetes Success Story

Another Type One Diabetes Success Story

Bob Krause has been successfully managing Type 1 diabetes for85 years! If you do not think this is a tremendousachievement, then you do not recognize the struggle living with Type 1 diabetes can be. Dr. Bernstein, an icon of diabetes care , is another wonderful example of successfullymanaging Type 1diabetes. Krause had the right ideas about food, Food is fuel. Amen! Krause ate a low carb paleo meal plan, though he did not call it that. Does this look like most 90 year old diabetics you know? Answer: No. There are not many 90+ year old diabetics. Most die far too early, after decades of pain and suffering. Update: Bob Krause died in 2012 a few months short of his 91st birthday. He lived a long and full life, successfully managing his diabetes. When Bob Krause turned 90 last week, it was by virtue of an unflagging determination and a mentality of precision that kept his body humming after being diagnosed with diabetes as a boy. I see, read and hear diabetics complaining on a daily basis about the damaging affects of high blood sugars and they did not live most of their lives without the latest diabetes tools and gadgetry that we have today, like Bob did. What is the difference between people who have terrible blood sugar control and Mr. Krause? Im a stubborn old man. I refuse to give up. WOW! he hit the nail on the head in my opinion.He refused to give up and he refused to give in. Mr. Krause then goes into more specifics relating to his strategies for successfully managing diabetes. The former University of Washington mechanical engineering professor says hes succeeded because he treats his body like a car and he only eats enough food to fuel the machine. To keep your diabetes under control you only eat the food you need to before you have activities to perform, Krause Continue reading >>

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