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Type 1 Diabetes Statistics Australia

4364.0.55.001 - National Health Survey: First Results, 2014-15

4364.0.55.001 - National Health Survey: First Results, 2014-15

DIABETES MELLITUS Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition where insulin, a hormone that controls blood glucose levels, is no longer produced or not produced in sufficient amounts by the body. It significantly affects the health of many Australians and can result in a range of complications, including serious damage to the nerves and blood vessels. If left undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can lead to coronary heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, limb amputations or blindness. Definitions In this publication, data on diabetes refers to persons who reported having been told by a doctor or nurse that they had diabetes, irrespective of whether the person considered their diabetes to be current or long-term. This definition was first used for estimates of diabetes in Australian Health Survey: Updated Results, 2011-12 (cat. no. 4364.0.55.003). Estimates of diabetes for all years in this publication are presented using this definition. In earlier publications, persons who had reported having diabetes but that it was not current were not included. Data excludes gestational diabetes. In 2014-15, 5.1% of the Australian population (1.2 million people) had some type of diabetes, an increase from 4.5% in 2011-12. One million people (4.4%) had Type 2 diabetes in 2014-15, up from 840,000 people (3.8%) in 2011-12. A further 158,900 people (0.7%) had Type 1 diabetes in 2014-15, up from 113,400 people in 2011-12 (0.5%). More males (5.7%) had diabetes than females (4.6%) in 2014-15, and, as with many health conditions, the rate of diabetes increased with age. Of people aged 75 years and over, almost one in five (18.4%) had diabetes in 2014-15. One of the main risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes is being overweight or obese[1], as excess body weight can interfere with the Continue reading >>

Type-1 | Diabetes Victoria

Type-1 | Diabetes Victoria

Join us Media About us Contact us Online help Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin. Insulin acts like a key to open cells and let glucose enter from the blood.The glucose comes from the food we eat and gives us energy. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children and young adults, but can occur at any age. Only 10 to 15 out of 100 people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. This means the body's own immune system destroys the cells that make insulin. We don't yet know the exact cause. A person will only develop type 1 diabetes if they: Are exposed to a trigger such as a viral infection What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes? Symptoms of high blood glucose levels such as: Ketones can develop in the body if type 1 diabetes isn't diagnosed early enough. When the pancreas doesnt make enough insulin, glucose can't get into the cells of the muscles. The body then breaks down fat for energy, which produces ketones. A build-up of ketones in the blood is toxic and can lead to Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). This is very serious and needs to be treated urgently in hospital. The treatment of type 1 diabetes is insulin. Insulin can't be given in tablet form, so people with type 1 diabetes must have insulin injections every day to live. Insulin can also be given by an insulin pump which delivers insulin to just below the skin.The goal is to keep blood glucose levels as close to the normal range as possible. This helps reduce long term complications. Balancing insulin doses with the amount of carbohydrate eaten and physical activity At this stage type 1 diabetes can't be prevented or cured, although there is a great deal of research being done. There are over 118,000 people in Australia living with t Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

For our bodies to work properly we need to convert glucose (sugar) from food into energy. A hormone called insulin is essential for the conversion of glucose into energy. In people with diabetes, insulin is no longer produced or not produced in sufficient amounts by the body. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease characterised by high levels of glucose in the blood. Blood sugar levels are controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin, or the body becomes resistant to insulin, or both. There are three main forms of the disease: Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease where the body's immune system attacks the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin and require lifelong insulin injections for survival. The disease can occur at any age, although it mostly occurs in children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes is sometimes referred to as juvenile onset diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is associated with hereditary factors and lifestyle risk factors including poor diet, insufficient physical activity and overweight or obesity. People with type 2 diabetes may be able to manage their condition through lifestyle changes; however, diabetes medications or insulin injections may also be required to control blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years old, however, the disease is also becoming increasingly prevalent in younger age groups. Gestational diabetes occurs during pregnancy. The condition usually disappears once the baby is born, however, a history of gestational diabetes increases a woman's risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. The condition may be managed throu Continue reading >>

Prevelence Of Diabetes In Australia

Prevelence Of Diabetes In Australia

National Diabetes Week is a whole week dedicated to increasing public awareness of the seriousness of type 2 diabetes and to draw attention to the increasing number of Australia’s developing the condition. Diabetes Australia has developed a quirky campaign, using strong images illustrating the irrational fears that many people have, versus the real and hidden threats of diabetes – Did you know: 2 million Australians are at a HIGH risk of type 2 diabetes 58% of type 2 diabetes cases can be prevented or delayed though lifestyle modification Losing weight, eating a healthy diet and moving more can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes Research shows around 80% of Australians don’t think type two diabetes is something they need to worry about 280 Australian’s develop diabetes every day. Over 100,000 Australia have developed diabetes in the past year. Why do we focus on Diabetes? Diabetes is predicted to becoming the number one burden of disease in Australia by 2017 (in just 3 years time). It is the epidemic of the 21st century with all types of diabetes – type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes showing scary increases in prevalence. How many people are currently living with diabetes? The best current estimate is that at least 1.7 million Australians have diabetes and this estimate includes all types of diabetes diagnosed as well as silent, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. Almost 1.1 million Australians currently have diagnosed and are registered with the National Diabetes Services Scheme More about Diabetes: There are three kinds of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Gestational Diabetes (GDM) Type 1 Diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system is activated to destroy the cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. It is not yet kno Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Type 1 Diabetes Among Children Aged 0–14 In Australia 2013

Prevalence Of Type 1 Diabetes Among Children Aged 0–14 In Australia 2013

Prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0–14 in Australia 2013 presents the first national picture of children aged 0–14 living with type 1 diabetes in Australia. The report, based on data from the National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register, highlights that in 2013, 6,091 children aged 0–14 had type 1 diabetes in Australia. This represented 139 cases per 100,000 population, or about 1 in 720 Australians aged 0–14. About 2 in 5 children with type 1 diabetes used an insulin pump to administer insulin. The prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children differed by age, state/territory, and residential remoteness areas. This report presents information about the prevalence and characteristics of children aged 0-14 with type 1 diabetes in Australia, based on data from the 2013 National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register (NDR). This is the first time national statistics on the prevalence of type 1 diabetes among children aged 0-14 have been reported by the NDR. Type 1 diabetes is a non-preventable lifelong autoimmune disease, which is most commonly diagnosed in children. It is a difficult condition to manage, and if left untreated or improperly managed, can lead to many health complications or death. Ongoing, regular monitoring of type 1 diabetes is essential to improve Australia's ability to respond to this important health problem. In 2013, 6,091 children aged 0-14 had type 1 diabetes in Australia-representing 139 cases per 100,000 population, or about 1 in every 720 children in that age group. Rates of type 1 diabetes were similar for both boys and girls. Rates for children aged 10-14 were twice as high (278 cases per 100,000 population) as for children aged 5-9 (123 per 100,000), and more than 10 times as high as for children aged 0-4 (27 per 100,000). Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes

What Is Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system mistakenly turning on itself, destroying beta cells within the pancreas and removing the body's ability to produce insulin. Insulin allows the body to process sugar to create energy - without insulin, the body literally starves as it cannot process food. Treating Type 1 Diabetes The goal of type 1 diabetes management is to keep blood glucose levels as close to the normal range as possible. It sounds easy, but in reality, this is very difficult to achieve. To stay alive, people with type 1 diabetes must have a constant supply of insulin through injections or an insulin pump and they test their blood sugar by pricking their fingers at least four times a day. People with type 1 diabetes must be constantly prepared for potential hypoglycaemic (low blood sugar) and hyperglycaemic (high blood sugar) reactions, which can both be life threatening. Hypoglycaemia and Hyperglycaemia Hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) is a common and dangerous condition for many people with type 1 diabetes. It can be caused by eating less than usual, more exercise than normal or too much insulin administered. Hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar) occurs when the body has too much food or glucose, or too little insulin. It can be caused by a clog in insulin pump tubing, missing an insulin dose, eating more than usual, stress or less exercise than normal. These low and high blood sugar level reactions show the constant balance that those with type 1 diabetes have to endure in their everyday life. Type 1 Diabetes Statistics Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children, it occurs more frequently than cancer, cystic fibrosis, multiple sclerosis and muscular dystrophy Approximately 2400 Australians are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes every Continue reading >>

Deaths Among People With Diabetes In Australia 2009–2014

Deaths Among People With Diabetes In Australia 2009–2014

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has released this report which highlights that death rates for people with diabetes are almost double those of other Australians and that people with diabetes are more likely to die prematurely. Between 2009 and 2014, death rates fell by 20 per cent for people with type 1 diabetes but rose by 10 per cent for those with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and its complications are major causes of illness, disability and death in Australia. People with diabetes are more likely to die prematurely than people without diabetes. This report examines the 156,000 deaths that occurred between 2009 and 2014 among 1.3 million Australians with diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Specifically, data from the National Diabetes Services Scheme and the National Death Index were combined to look at causes of death and death rates for people with diabetes compared with the general population. Creating a comprehensive picture of diabetes-related deaths is important for population-based prevention strategies and could help to improve care for all people with diabetes. Death rates for people with diabetes almost double that of other Australians Compared with the Australian population, death rates for people with diabetes were nearly twice as high for those with type 1 diabetes in 2012-2014, and 1.6 times as high for those with type 2 diabetes in 2014. This higher mortality was apparent across sex, age, socioeconomic status and remoteness (for type 2 diabetes only) groups. The disparity in death rates between people with diabetes and the general population was highest at younger ages-death rates were 4.5 times as high for people aged under 45 with type 1 diabetes and almost 6 times as high for those with type 2 diabetes, compared with the Australi Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Children And Young People

Type 1 Diabetes - Children And Young People

The number of ACT children and young people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (Insulin treated). The prevalence and incidence of type 1 diabetes in ACT children and young people. Prevalence refers to the number or proportion of ACT children and young people who have type 1 diabetes at any given time; incidence is the number of new cases of type 1 diabetes diagnosed in ACT children and young people within a specific time period (for this indicator, it is per calendar year). Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the pancreas produces very little, or no, insulin. It is caused by the immune system attacking the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Although adults can develop type 1 diabetes, onset most commonly occurs in childhood or early adulthood. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin every day (delivered via injections or an insulin pump) to replace the insulin their bodies cannot produce. They must check their blood for glucose (sugar) levels several times each day. This helps them avoid ketoacidosis (very high blood sugar) and hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) which if left untreated, can become life-threatening.20 Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes (accounting for approximately 87 per cent of cases in Australia),21 but all forms of the disease impact individual health and wellbeing, and have social and economic ramifications for families and communities. Diabetes can lead to health problems including disability, poor quality of life and premature death.22 Many studies around the world have shown an increase in the incidence of diabetes. The rise of type 2 diabetes has received the most attention from health professionals, policy experts and the media, but the evidence also points to a steady increase in type 1 diabetes since Continue reading >>

Diabetes Snapshot, Type 1 Diabetes - Australian Institute Of Health And Welfare

Diabetes Snapshot, Type 1 Diabetes - Australian Institute Of Health And Welfare

Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian Standard Population. Year of first insulin use is a proxy for year of diagnosis. Source: AIHW analysis of 2016National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register (NDR) ( see data ). The incidence rate of type 1 diabetes was higher in males than females (13 compared with 10 per 100,000 population). Almost 3 in 5 (60%) new cases of type 1 diabetes were among children and young people under 25 years. The peak age group of diagnosis was 1019 years (28 and 25 per 100,000 for males and females, respectively)at least 2 times the rate at age 3039 (13 and 6 per 100,000) and at least 8 times the rate for those aged 80 years and over (3 per 100,000 for males and females)(Figure 4). Figure 4: Incidence of type 1 diabetes, by age at diagnosis and sex, 2016 Note: Year of first insulin use is a proxy for year of diagnosis. Source: AIHW analysis of 2016National (insulin-treated) Diabetes Register ( Data tables ). In 2016, the incidence rate of type 1 diabetes was relatively similar among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians, across all socioeconomic groups and remoteness areas (Figure 5). Figure 5: Incidence of type 1 diabetes, by selected population characteristics, 2016 Continue reading >>

Social Disparities In The Prevalence Of Diabetes In Australia And In The Development Of End Stage Renal Disease Due To Diabetes For Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islanders In Australia And Maori And Pacific Islanders In New Zealand

Social Disparities In The Prevalence Of Diabetes In Australia And In The Development Of End Stage Renal Disease Due To Diabetes For Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islanders In Australia And Maori And Pacific Islanders In New Zealand

Social disparities in the prevalence of diabetes in Australia and in the development of end stage renal disease due to diabetes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in Australia and Maori and Pacific Islanders in New Zealand BMC Public HealthBMC series open, inclusive and trusted2017 Disparities in health status occur between people with differing socioeconomic status and disadvantaged groups usually have the highest risk exposure and the worst health outcome. We sought to examine the social disparities in the population prevalence of diabetes and in the development of treated end stage renal disease due to type 1 diabetes which has not previously been studied in Australia and New Zealand in isolation from type 2 diabetes. This observational study examined the population prevalence of diabetes in a sample of the Australian population (7,434,492) using data from the National Diabetes Services Scheme and of treated end stage renal disease due to diabetes using data from the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry. The data were then correlated with the Australian Bureau of Statistics Socioeconomic Indexes for Areas for an examination of socioeconomic disparities. There is a social gradient in the prevalence of diabetes in Australia with disease incidence decreasing incrementally with increasing affluence (Spearmans rho=.765 p<0.001). There is a higher risk of developing end stage renal disease due to type 1 diabetes for males with low socioeconomic status (RR 1.20; CI 1.0021.459) in comparison to females with low socioeconomic status. In Australia and New Zealand Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, Maori and Pacific Islanders appear to have a low risk of end stage renal disease due to type 1 diabetes but continue to carry a vastly disproport Continue reading >>

Incidence Of Childhood Onset Type 1 Diabetes In Western Australia From 1985 To2016: Evidence For A Plateau.

Incidence Of Childhood Onset Type 1 Diabetes In Western Australia From 1985 To2016: Evidence For A Plateau.

1. Pediatr Diabetes. 2018 Jan 4. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12636. [Epub ahead of print] Incidence of childhood onset type 1 diabetes in Western Australia from 1985 to2016: Evidence for a plateau. Haynes A(1), Bulsara MK(2), Jones TW(1)(3), Davis EA(1)(3). (1)Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Subiaco, Australia. (2)Institute of Health and Rehabilitation Research, University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Australia. (3)Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Subiaco, Australia. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D)in Western Australia from 2011 to 2016, and to examine the temporal trendsbetween 1985 and 2016.METHODS: An observational cohort study was undertaken of all children newlydiagnosed with T1D aged 0 to 14 years in Western Australia from 1985 to 2016.Cases were identified from the Western Australian Children's Diabetes Database, apopulation-based diabetes register previously estimated to be >99% complete.Annual age-standardized and age- and sex-specific incidence rates were calculatedand the Joinpoint Regression Program used to identify any significant changes in trends over the study period.RESULTS: A total of 2499 cases were included (1272 boys, 1227 girls). The overallmean annual incidence was 19.1/100 000 person years (95% confidence interval, CI:18.3-19.8), with no significant difference found between boys and girls. The meanannual incidence of 12.1/100 000 person years (95% CI: 11.1-13.1) in 0 to 4-yearswas significantly lower than that observed in 5 to 9 (21.6/100 000 [95% CI:20.2-23.0]) and 10 to 14 (23.5/100 000 [95% CI: 22.1-25.0]) years. Joinpointregression analysis identified a significant change in the temporal trendoccurring in 2003. From 1985 to 2003, the incide Continue reading >>

An Audit Of The Dietary Intake Of Australian Children With Type 1 Diabetes

An Audit Of The Dietary Intake Of Australian Children With Type 1 Diabetes

An audit of the dietary intake of Australian children with type 1 diabetes Nutrition & Diabetesvolume8, Articlenumber:10 (2018) | Download Citation To understand what children with type 1 diabetes in a representative tertiary hospital clinic are eating compared to their peers and explore dietary intake impact on HbA1c outcome. An open cross-sectional dietary audit of children and adolescents with diabetes aged 217 years attending the Royal Childrens Hospital, Melbourne was conducted using an age-appropriate validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Total energy, macronutrient intake and diet quality were calculated and compared to dietary advice provided and national intake data. Body weight, and dietary intake influences on glycaemic control were investigated. Overall, 785 patients were recruited, from which 429 dietary surveys were completed. Dietary intakes were overall nutritionally adequate with macronutrient distribution (% total energy intake) being lower carbohydrate (48.6%), higher total sugars (22.4%), fat (32.9%), saturated fat (14.9%) and protein intake (19.1%) than recommendations, but similar to their peers. Energy intakes were excessive compared to their peers in the 413 year olds. Rates of overweight (30%) were significantly higher than national data (18%). Overall, 43% achieved optimal glycaemic control (HbA1c < 7.5%; <58 mmol/mol). HbA1c prediction via linear regression indicated that the following factors were associated with lower HbA1c values: being male, on pump regimen, lower rates of insulin per kg, shorter duration of disease. This audit has identified areas requiring targeted education/support to improve health outcomes including dietary adherence, rates of overweight/obesity, appropriate energy intakes and optimal glycaemic targets. Furthermore Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) is an autoimmune disease in which the pancreas is unable to produce enough of a hormone called insulin. This reduced insulin production results in a higher-than-normal level of glucose in the blood – a condition called 'hyperglycaemia' (high blood glucose). About 120,000 people in Australia have Type 1 diabetes. It's usually diagnosed during childhood or early adulthood, but it can develop at any age. Glucose is a type of sugar that comes from carbohydrates in your food and it's your body's main source of fuel. Insulin enables glucose in your blood to enter your body's cells, where it is converted into useable energy. If your pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin, then glucose is less able to enter your body's cells. Your body's cells are then less able to access the fuel they need for energy, and there will also be a corresponding build-up of glucose in your blood. This will eventually lead to the development of hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose) and it is this hyperglycaemia that causes the characteristic symptoms – and potential complications – of Type 1 diabetes. Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes The common symptoms of Type 1 diabetes are due to the higher-than-normal blood glucose levels that are associated with the disease. Increased urination: When you have too much glucose in your blood, your kidneys have to filter increased sugar which makes them produce larger amounts of urine. Experiencing a need to pass urine more often than usual is therefore one of the common symptoms of Type 1 diabetes. Unquenchable thirst: Another common symptom of Type 1 diabetes is unquenchable thirst. The thirst is a response to dehydration resulting from the excess urine production and also from water being drawn from the tissu Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Australia

Diabetes In Australia

Diabetes is the epidemic of the 21st century and the biggest challenge confronting Australia’s health system. 280 Australians develop diabetes every day. That’s one person every five minutes Around 1.7 million Australians have diabetes. This includes all types of diagnosed diabetes (1.2 million known and registered) as well as silent, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (up to 500,000 estimated) More than 100,000 Australians have developed diabetes in the past year For every person diagnosed with diabetes there is usually a family member or carer who also ‘lives with diabetes’ every day in a support role. This means that an estimated 2.4 million Australians are affected by diabetes every day Total annual cost impact of diabetes in Australia estimated at $14.6 billion Blindness Diabetes is the leading cause of preventable blindness in Australia. (Source) There are currently around 72,000 people in Australia with diabetic retinopathy, with approximately 3 in 5 experiencing poor sight. (Source) Diabetic retinopathy occurs in over 15 per cent of Australians with diabetes. (Source) The total indirect cost of vision loss associated with diabetic macular oedema in Australia is estimated to be $2.07 billion per annum. This is more than $28,000 per person with diabetic macular oedema. (Source) Amputations There are more than 4,400 amputations every year in Australia as a result of diabetes. (Source) In 2005, more than 1000 people with diabetes died as a direct result of foot ulcers and lower limb wounds – around 8% of all diabetes related deaths. (Source) Every year there are 10,000 hospital admissions in Australia for diabetes-related foot ulcers in Australia – many of these end with people having a limb, or part of a limb, amputated. (Source) Experts estimate diabetic foot Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is the name given to a group of different conditions in which the body cannot maintain healthy levels of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. Glucose builds up in the blood leading to high blood glucose levels which cause the health problems linked to diabetes. The main symptoms are: feeling very thirsty urinating frequently, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk. Check your symptoms with healthdirect’s Symptom Checker to get advice on when to seek medical attention, or if you are concerned you may have diabetes see your doctor. What causes diabetes? The amount of sugar in the blood is usually controlled by a hormone called 'insulin', which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it is broken down to produce energy. However, if you have diabetes, your body cannot break down glucose into energy. This is because there is either not enough insulin to move the glucose, or the insulin produced does not work properly. Glucose builds up in the blood resulting in high blood glucose levels. Diabetes types There are three main types of diabetes: Diabetes type 1 Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease where the body's immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin and require lifelong insulin replacement for survival. The disease can occur at any age, although it mostly occurs in children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes is sometimes referred to as 'juvenile onset diabetes' or 'insulin dependent diabetes'. Diabetes type 2 Type 2 diabetes is associated with hereditary factors and lifestyle risk factors including poor diet, insuff Continue reading >>

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