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Type 1 Diabetes Sexlife

Diabetes And Your Sex Life

Diabetes And Your Sex Life

People with diabetes are at risk for a number of complications that may affect their sex life. Most of these issues are caused by having high blood sugar levels over a period of years. In men, this can cause nerve damage and impaired blood circulation, which can cause problems with erections, genital sensation, and orgasm. Approximately 34% to 45% of men are affected by erectile dysfunction. In women, chronic high blood sugar can cause frequent vaginal yeast infections and urinary tract infections. Nerve damage can create difficulties with bladder control. High blood pressure, which often goes along with diabetes, can contribute to arousal and orgasm problems. Many other complications of diabetes may detract from the ability to relax and enjoy sexual activity. Pain caused by nerve damage, fatigue from dealing with the challenges of diabetes, and low energy levels caused by variable blood sugars can affect a person's mood and interest in sex. Some common medications used to treat diabetes and its complications, such as blood pressure medications and antidepressants, can cause difficulties with erection and reduce sex drive. Be sure to ask your pharmacist, physician, or primary health care provider about these and any other issues with your sex life. There are many ways to prevent or manage issues associated with the effects of diabetes on your sex life. The most important first step is to openly communicate any problems you may be having to your family physician or primary health care provider. This will enable them to recommend the best approach for you. The risk for erectile dysfunction in men can be reduced by keeping good control of blood sugar. Men with any level of erectile dysfunction should discuss the symptoms with their physician or primary health care provider Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Messing With Your Bladder And Sex Life?

Is Diabetes Messing With Your Bladder And Sex Life?

Is Diabetes Messing with Your Bladder and Sex Life? If you've noticed your sex life isn't what it used to be, and your bladder doesn't have the staying power that it once did, it may be time to talk to your doctor. A growing body of research finds that those with diabetes are more prone to urologic and sexual problems than those without the diagnosis. The good news: these problems can be treated and improved, or even eliminated. Paying attention to good lifestyle habits may also help, experts say. Both urologic and sexual problems are more common with age, but having diabetes, by itself, boosts the risk of both, says Aruna V. Sarma, MD, research associate professor of urology and epidemiology at the University of Michigan. She and two other experts talked about the issues at the recent annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. Dr. Sarma conducted a study to tease out the effects of age versus the effects of diabetes on how likely men and women would be to develop urologic and sexual problems. "We know now with our data that the burden of these [complications] is greater in those with diabetes, and their diabetes affects the complications." Among the findings from her research and that of others: If men report type 2 diabetes, they have almost twice the risk of urinary problems as men without the diagnosis. Urinary problems include infections, incontinence, and bladder cancer. Having type 2 diabetes increases the risk of getting bladder cancer by about 70%, especially in those who have been diagnosed less than five years, some research finds. Almost 50% of men with diabetes have erectile dysfunction, or ED (those with type 1 are even more likely, about 62%), while the overall percent among those men without diabetes is about 25%. While about 15% of women in o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sex

Diabetes And Sex

Tweet Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can lead to complications. In some cases, sexual performance can be affected by diabetes. Up to 50% of men and 25% of women may experience some kind of sexual problems or a loss of sexual desire as a result of diabetes. I am a diabetic man, what kind of problems could diabetes cause to my sex life? For men, diabetes can cause damage to the nervous system over a sustained period of time, also known as diabetic neuropathy. One aspect of this is the potential for diabetes to damage the erectile tissue leaving it impossible for a man to achieve or maintain an erection. Almost 1 in 3 men with diabetes suffer from erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction can be the way in which men discover that they have diabetes. However, through strict management if the disease through diet, exercise, pills and insulin injections, minor sexual problems usually recede and it is possible for the man to achieve and erection. I am a diabetic woman, what kind of problems could diabetes cause to my sex life? For some women with diabetes, vaginitis (inflammation of the vagina) can be recurrent. Vaginitis can be brought on by a number of different ways including bacterial inbalance of the vagina (bacterial vaginitis) yeast infections (thrush) or from chemical irritation, such as from soaps or fabric conditioners. This can make sex painful, and is heralded by itching or burning sensations. Cystitis can also be a recurrent problem for women with diabetes. Furthermore, some evidence indicates that, in a similar way to men being unable to maintain an erection, the woman’s clitoris may fail to respond to stimulation. Hypoglycemia and sex Hypoglycemia can occur during sex. You may also suffer from a night time hypo as the physical exertions of sex mean that in s Continue reading >>

What To Do When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

What To Do When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

Men living with diabetes have enough on their plate. They need to monitor their blood glucose level, blood pressure and, most likely, severalmedications. If this is you, and youre experiencing problemsinyour sex life, theres a good chance yourefeeling anxious, frustrated and depressed. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy You may know that erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get or maintain an erection . But did you know that ED is common among men who have diabetes ? This conditioncan stem from problems caused by poor long-term blood sugar control, which damages nerves and blood vessels. ED also can be linked to other conditions common in men with diabetes , such as high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. The same elevated blood glucose level that causes blood vessel and nerve damage in other parts of the body also can lead to complications in blood flow and nerve damage to the penis, says Kevin Borst, DO , an endocrinologist at Lakewood Hospitals Diabetes and Endocrine Center . Approximately half of all men living with diabetes will experience erectile dysfunction at some point, Dr. Borst says. Even if theres a medical reason behind it, ED can leave any man and his partner feeling frustrated and discouraged. If you or a loved one are experiencing ED, you are not alone. And you can take steps to cope. Tell your doctor whats going on. Your doctor will consider the underlying causes of your ED and can give you information about medication and other ED treatments. Ask what you need to do to control diabetes. Careful blood sugar control can prevent nerve and blood vessel damage that can lead to ED. Appropriately man Continue reading >>

Better Sex With Diabetes

Better Sex With Diabetes

WebMD Feature Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD Diabetes doesn't have to feel like a third -- and unwanted -- party in bed. You can deal with things like low blood sugar, vaginal dryness, or erection problems by looking at them as hurdles you can overcome, instead of roadblocks that put a stop to sex. Planning ahead can ease some of the challenges. You may associate prep work more with house painting than with having sex, but it can make intimacy more relaxed. Also remember that taking good care of your diabetes is the No. 1 way to prevent or limit sexual issues with diabetes. These tricks and tips can also make sex easier and more fun. 10 Strategies for Better Sex Approach sex like exercise. This helps prevent dreaded blood sugar lows. "Hypoglycemic events during sex are a real buzzkill," says Kerri Morrone Sparling, the author of Balancing Diabetes: Conversations About Finding Happiness and Living Well, who blogs about her life with type 1 diabetes. "Your body just shuts down during a low, so it crushes the enjoyment." If you use insulin, check your blood sugar before sex and have a snack if it's low. For more fun, incorporate snacks into foreplay. Try strawberries or a little ice cream or chocolate. Just go with it. Planning can be helpful, but don't sweat it if sex just happens. "There's no reason not to grab the opportunity if it pops up just because you haven't followed your diabetes exercise routine," says Scott K. Johnson, a diabetes advocate who blogs about his life with type 1 diabetes. Just check your glucose level after. Use a lubricant. If you are a woman with vaginal dryness, a vaginal lubricant can make sex feel better. Ask your doctor about using one regularly, not just during sex. "Think of it like hand cream," says Janis Roszler, a diabetes educator in Continue reading >>

Sex And Type 1 Diabetes

Sex And Type 1 Diabetes

When a person is diagnosed with diabetes, their doctor will typically walk them through the steps of how to deal with this medical issue in the following years; however, sex is rarely addressed, often leaving the patient feeling left in the dark. The journal Diabetes Care found that only half of all men and 19 percent of women with diabetes had broached the topic of sex with their doctors.1 It is crucial that individuals with Type I Diabetes become aware of the sexual problems associated with this health condition because certain symptoms can be assumed an effect of Type 1 diabetes, but be caused from an unrelated medical condition. For people that already have diabetes, sexual problems can indicate nerve damage, blocked arteries, and irregular hormone patterns.2 People who keep their diabetes under control can lower their risk of developing these sexual and urologic problems in the future. Talk to Your Partner Establishing a strong system of communication with your partner is a crucial component of every relationship. Along with discussing sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and contraception usage, Type 1 diabetics should express how diabetes affects their sex life. Many Type 1 diabetics may feel self conscious about their condition and try to hide it from their partners. If you do this, however, you may not feel comfortable asking your partner for a break from sex in the case of a low blood sugar and put yourself in a dangerous situation. Sex is an intense physical activity and as any Type 1 diabetic knows, this can cause a fast drop in blood glucose level. Make sure your partner knows how to care for you in case you experience a severe low blood sugar level and are unable to care for yourself. It is your responsibility as a diabetic to protect yourself and give t Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

How Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

It's easy to pin a lagging libido on stress, depression, age, or lack of sleep. But if your sexual feelings have changed or if intercourse has become uncomfortable or nearly impossible, either as a result of chronically high blood glucose levels (an occasional high level will not cause long-term problems) or nerve problems, diabetes could be the cause. Experts estimate that 75 percent of men and 35 percent of women with diabetes experience some sexual problems due to diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage) to the nerves that stimulate normal sexual response. The good news: Research has shown that people can lower their risk for diabetes-related sexual problems by taking steps to control their diabetes, including: The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), a 10-year National Institutes of Health study of individuals with type 1 diabetes, found that improved diabetes control decreased the risk of developing neuropathy by 60 percent. This means the steps you can take to manage your diabetes are the same keys that open the doors to a healthy sexual relationship. What Women Should Know About Sex and Diabetes Women with diabetes may find it difficult to stimulate lubrication, experience orgasm, or even feel sexual desire due to nerve damage. These steps can reduce sexual complications and increase pleasure. Get rid of dryness: For persistent vaginal dryness, purchase a water-base vaginal lubricant over the counter from any pharmacy. You might also work on relaxing the muscles around the vagina with Kegel exercises: contracting your pelvic muscles to control the flow of urine. Lose weight: Being overweight can contribute to low self-esteem and loss of libido. A recent Duke University study found that shedding weight (17.5 percent of body weight) helped obese men and women Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Sexual Function

How Diabetes Affects Sexual Function

Diabetes can affect sexual function, and as uncomfortable as it may sound, you may need to discuss this with your doctor (and certainly with your partner). To help you out, I have done research to bring you information about this most sensitive of subjects. First of all, having any chronic disease may in itself cause anxiety, which can result in sexual dysfunction. But having said that, it is also true that diabetics do report more sexual dysfunction than the populations at large. In his book Talking About Sex (American Psychiatric Press, Inc., 1995), Derek C. Polonsky, MD states that 20% of people with diabetes, both men and women, report sexual dysfunction. Please read the following with an open mind, not looking for something bad which will happen to you or a loved one. Rather use it as a tool to make you better informed, and more able to talk to the professionals in your life who can help when you need it. As Dr. Polonsky says, "What starts out as a physical problem is compounded by the emotional reaction to it." This article is shared to help all of us deal with the physical before this occurs. Research on Diabetes and Sexual Dysfunction There is more research on sexual dysfunction in males than females. In males, current research points to the need to develop a comprehensive biopsychosocial evaluation and treatment of diabetic patients with sexual dysfunction because of the high incidence of major depression and anxiety disorders noted in impotent men with neuropathy as compared to those who did not have depression, anxiety, or impotence, but had neuropathy. One caveat here is that just learning to cope with a chronic disease may cause psychiatric problems which may lead to lack of compliance, and may snowball into chronic complications, and so the process feeds o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Healthy Sex-life

Diabetes And A Healthy Sex-life

Living With Diabetes Starts With Proper Management Whilesexseems to be everywhere, television, billboards, magazine covers etc Americans are still reluctant to go to the doctor to talk about issues when it relates tosex, especially diabetics. However, many people, whether they have diabetes or not, havesexual problems. Does it need to be a deal breaker, absolutely not so lets take a look at that giant elephant in the room. The Journal of the American Medical Association reported in February of 1999 about a survey conducted of 1,749 women and 1,410 men aged 18 to 59. The survey found sexual dysfunction is more prevalent for women (43%) than men (31%). Diabetesmay affect sexual functioning in several ways, but there are some things you may need to look out for when it comes to sex and if you suffer from diabetes: If you feel diabetes is causing problems with your sex life, talk to your doctor. While no-one relishes talking about sexual problems with a doctor, these issues can only be addressed if you seek help. Your doctor will try to find out whether sexual problems are caused by defects in the nervous or circulatory system as a result of the diabetes, or whether they are of a more psychological nature. Often this distinction is difficult to make. In any case, when sexual dysfunction begins to happen on a regular basis it tends to get worse unless it is properly treated, so the psychological element inevitably builds up. An increasing number of men who have diabetes anderectile dysfunction(ED) are being helped by medicines such assildenafil (Viagra),tadalafil (Cialis)andvardenafil (Levitra). Or if youre not into taking medication prescribed by your doctor (which I prefer), how aboutessential oils? Oils such as ylang ylang which is anaphrodisiacor red hot romance, a blen Continue reading >>

Sexual Issues And Type 1 Diabetes

Sexual Issues And Type 1 Diabetes

Having type 1 diabetes can increase the risk of sexual dysfunction for both men and women. The good news is this may be preventable and, should it occur, there are treatments that can help. Diabetes: Sexual Problems in Men In men, the nerve damage and problems with circulation that are common complications of type 1 diabetes can lead to problems with erection or ejaculation. "Hyperglycemia [high blood sugar] affects the blood vessels everywhere — the heart, eyes, kidneys. Changes in blood vessels can also affect the ability to have and maintain an erection," explains Jennifer Goldman-Levine, PharmD, a diabetes educator and associate professor of pharmacy practice at Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Boston. “Erectile dysfunction is much higher in patients with type 1 diabetes than in the general population, and it is directly reflective of hyperglycemia and poor blood sugar control," Goldman-Levine says. With diabetes, blood vessels supplying the penis’s erectile tissue can get hard and narrow, preventing the adequate blood supply needed for a firm erection. The nerve damage caused by poor blood glucose control can also cause ejaculate to go into the bladder instead of through the penis during ejaculation, called retrograde ejaculation. When this happens, semen leaves the body in the urine. Diabetes: Sexual Problems in Women The cause of diabetes-related sexual dysfunction in women is also due to poorly controlled blood glucose levels leading to nerve damage, reduced blood flow to the genitals, and hormonal changes. It is estimated that up to a quarter of women with type 1 diabetes experience sexual dysfunction, often due to hardened blood vessels in the vaginal walls. Sexual problems can include vaginal dryness, pain or discomfort during se Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

Most people are aware that diabetes contributes to heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, blindness and renal failure. It’s a progressive disease that can debilitate one’s body, organ by organ, when left out of control. But did you know that, long before any of these take place, diabetes can kill your sex life? Diabetes itself is not responsible for the damage done to the body. Instead, it is the rise in blood sugar that comes from either insufficient insulin release (type 1 diabetes) or a body’s resistance to the effects of insulin (type 2 diabetes). Unlike type 1 diabetes, which starts in childhood, type 2 diabetes begins in adults and is almost always related to being obese or overweight for some time. Often, it can be reversed if you return to a normal weight. Many doctors are happy if they see their diabetic patients maintain their blood sugar under 150, or even 180 if they’ve had the disease for a while. I believe, however, these levels still permit slow degeneration of the tissues and nerves of the body, which can severely affect quality of life. Ideally, a level between 80 and 125 is best. Good sexual functioning depends on good blood flow and the ability to not only perceive sensations, but to have the organs and tissues respond to these sensations. When your blood sugar is high, cells cannot function properly and nerve endings become damaged. This can cause numbness—or worse, uncomfortable tingling. Uncontrolled levels of blood sugar also damage the blood vessels by decreasing their ability to relax and contract when needed, as well as by raising the risk of atherosclerosis, which in turn impairs blood flow. These changes can affect your sex life, too. Nerve damage can result in decreased sensation in the genitals, which makes it more di Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Sex Life?

How Does Diabetes Affect Your Sex Life?

Having diabetes affects much more than a person's diet - it can impact every aspect of their life, including their sexual health. Similarly, it is not just the physical side effects of diabetes that cause problems. Diabetes can have an impact on a person's mental health, their sex drive, and their self-esteem. How does diabetes impact the sexual organs? Diabetes can affect the sexual health of both men and women in the following ways: Impact on women Damage caused by diabetes to the nerves can affect a woman's ability to sense sexual stimulation and arousal. This can affect the release of vaginal lubricant, which may result in painful sex and reduced ability to experience an orgasm. When a woman who has diabetes goes through the menopause, she may experience sudden drops in her blood sugar levels. This may affect a woman's sexual health because she may have to check her blood sugar before having sex. She might also experience symptoms of low blood sugar during sex. This may make sex seem more of an inconvenience than a pleasure. Women with diabetes are also more likely to experience infections, such as thrush, cystitis, and urinary tract infections. These can all impact the ability to have sexual intercourse. Impact on men Men with diabetes often have reduced testosterone levels, which can affect their sex drive. However, the main sexual health problem affecting men who have diabetes is an inability to achieve and, or, maintain an erection. According to the Joslin Diabetes Center, an estimated 50 percent of men who have had diabetes for 10 years experience erectile dysfunction (ED). In order for a man to achieve an erection, significant blood flow to the penis is required. However, diabetes damages the blood vessels, which can affect blood flow to the penis. Diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Partners Speak Out About Sex

Partners Speak Out About Sex

They say sex sells. Apparently, sex problems are also a hot topic. I received three comments on last weeks post ( "ADA Advice on Sex" ) from women whose male partners with diabetes have withdrawn from sex. There is a lot of this going around. I want to thank and congratulate all the people who commented. Its brave to bring up sexual issues. Its also brave to bring up partner issues. My wife says partners get lots of pats on the headYoure so brave, Youre really there for himbut very little actual help. Ive led and spoken to all kinds of support groups since I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) 22 years ago, and I know one thing. There are lots of support groups for people with problems, but very little for their partners. There is support, for example, for adult survivors of incest, but there are no support groups for partners of adult survivors of anything. This can cause problems for the person who needs help and the partner both. Since everyone is so honest here, Ill tell you a little of my story. About five years ago, my health got to the point where I couldnt have reliable erections either. We had other relationship problems that contributed to my losing interest, but the erection issues played a big part. I tried Viagra, but it didnt work very well. So I withdrew. It wasnt fair to my wife, but because of our other problems, I didnt really care. She spent two years getting more desperate, and our relationship kept getting more distant. She looked into finding sex in other places, which was OK with me. It took the pressure off. I can tell you more about that if you write me . The interesting thing was that, now that I could relax about sex, I stopped worrying about erections. I learned other ways to please her, and soon I found that we were having hotter sex Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

When Diabetes Affects Your Sex Life

Mike’s doctor looked and sounded concerned. “Your sugars are up, your blood pressure is up, and you’ve gained 10 pounds since I last saw you, ” she said. “You were doing so well. What happened? ” “I don’t know,” said Mike. “I’m just down. Exercising and checking my blood glucose don’t seem worth the effort now. My neuropathy is burning holes in my feet. It’s been a hard year.” “Sounds to me like you’re depressed,” said the doctor. She then wrote out a prescription for a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for Mike’s depression and another for a refill of Mike’s usual blood pressure medicine, but this time with a higher dose. The doctor didn’t ask about Mike’s sex life, and Mike didn’t volunteer that what was really bothering him was that he and his wife Barbara had stopped having sex about 10 months before. He couldn’t count on getting erections or keeping them, and without them, he withdrew, both physically and emotionally. He and Barbara were miserable. Unfortunately, both of the medicines his doctor had just prescribed can have the side effects of decreasing sex drive and making it harder for men to have erections. So the new treatments were potentially going to make Mike’s problem worse. Mike hadn’t mentioned his sexual problems to his doctor because he felt embarrassed about them, and his doctor apparently didn’t think to ask about sexual issues. Had she known about Mike’s erection difficulties, she might have prescribed a drug for erectile dysfunction rather than an antidepressant. But Mike had already bought some Viagra on the Internet. It had helped a little with the erections, but not much, and it did nothing for his energy level or low mood. Barbara was at her wit’s end. She thought Mike’s wit Continue reading >>

Does A Type-1 Diabetic Have To Say Goodbye To Good Sex? Here's How Not To Allow Sugar To Hurt Your Sex-life

Does A Type-1 Diabetic Have To Say Goodbye To Good Sex? Here's How Not To Allow Sugar To Hurt Your Sex-life

Does a Type-1 diabetic have to say goodbye to good sex? Here's how not to allow sugar to hurt your sex-life Updated Apr 23, 2018 | 14:38IST | Times Now Digital Only half of the men and 19% of women have broached the topic with their doctors, according to a study published in the journal Diabetes Care. Nerve damage, blocked arteries, and irregular hormone patterns are some of the common problems individuals with diabetes are diagnosed with. However, these sexual and urological issues can be kept at bay with proper control of diabetes. Diabetes affects an individuals sex life as well. |Photo Credit: Thinkstock New Delhi: Once someone is diagnosed with diabetes, seldom do their doctors tell them about ways to maintain their sexual health. This often leaves the patient clueless and in the dark about how diabetes affects an individuals sex life. Only half of the men and 19% of women have broached the topic with their doctors, according to a study published in the journal Diabetes Care. It is important for individuals with type 1 diabetes to be aware of their sexual health and problems related to it because there are health issues which can be caused by diabetes and otherwise. Nerve damage, blocked arteries, and irregular hormone patterns are some of the common problems individuals with diabetes are diagnosed with. However, these sexual and urological issues can be kept at bay with proper control of diabetes. Sex is also a form of rigorous physical exercise. So like any other activity that involves physical exertion has an effect on one's blood sugar levels, sex is also bound to affect the person's sugar levels. if you find yourself dripping in sweat, throat going dry and your heart hammering in your chest, it might not be just a moment of passion, there are fair chances Continue reading >>

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