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Type 1 Diabetes Running Tips

Type 1 Diabetes In Children: Safe Exercise - Topic Overview

Type 1 Diabetes In Children: Safe Exercise - Topic Overview

Children who take insulin are at risk of hypoglycemia during and after exercise. But with good planning and awareness, a child can exercise and participate in sports safely. Good planning means checking blood sugars before, during, and after exercise. Then, you can keep a record of how exercise affects your child's blood sugars. Remember that each child will react to exercise differently. But using your records, you can usually predict how your child will react to activity. Use the following tips for exercising safely: Do not let your child exercise if blood sugar is over 250 mg/dL and ketones are present. If your child's blood sugar is over 250 mg/dL before exercise, he or she may need to drink more fluids. Check your child's blood sugar during the activity to be sure the level is lower. Make sure your child's blood sugar is in the target range before exercise-to avoid low blood sugar. Make sure your child wears identification. Some children may prefer a temporary medical ID tattoo instead of a medical ID bracelet, especially when playing sports. Make sure your child drinks water so he or she does not get dehydrated. Talk with your child's doctor about lowering the insulin dose that your child takes before exercise. Inject the insulin before exercise in a site other than the parts of the body your child will be using during exercise. For example, if your child will be running, do not inject insulin in the leg. Have some quick-sugar food (hard candy, fruit juice, honey) on hand at all times. You can also make sure your child's coach carries quick-sugar foods. If your child's blood sugar is below the target range before exercise, consider giving your child 15 grams of carbohydrate from quick-sugar food (hard candy, fruit juice, honey). If your child will be exercising ve Continue reading >>

How To Fuel For A Long Run With Type 1 Diabetes

How To Fuel For A Long Run With Type 1 Diabetes

We recently got reader mail asking for help with balancing long runs, fueling, and Type 1 diabetes. Keith, a longtime runner, wrote in to tell us he was recently diagnosed with rare, late-onset Type 1 diabetes. Being diagnosed with Type 1 as an adult is rare in the sense that Type 1 is typically diagnosed earlier in life; the condition was once referred to as juvenile diabetes. Keith notes that during long runs, he takes a GU energy gel every 15 minutes, and he successfully fueled for a half-marathon using this formula. While Keith tolerates the GU and has designed it so he ends up with blood sugar levels just slightly above normal, he was wondering if there was another gel that might be better for diabetics—perhaps one that lasts longer. Or, he asks, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it?" Keith, I'm so glad you asked. As you know, there are many health benefits of exercise for athletes with diabetes (and we covered many of them here when discussing Type 2 diabetes). But unlike running with Type 2, running with Type 1 (especially long-distance running) requires more planning and precautionary measures. Type 1 diabetes accounts for only 5-10% of all cases, yet most avid athletes with diabetes fall into the Type 1 category. While athletes with Type 2 often make their own insulin and rely on changes to the diet and exercise (and maybe oral meds) to manage the disease, athletes with Type 1 have absolute insulin deficiency, which means that this chronic disease is treated with diet and exercise along with insulin injections. While most runners don't need to think twice about insulin or glucagon levels—or even glucose production during exercise—for the athlete with Type 1, careful consideration must be given to these factors before, during, and after each run. Many variable Continue reading >>

Seans Story: Paleo, Type 1 Diabetes & The Endurance Athelete

Seans Story: Paleo, Type 1 Diabetes & The Endurance Athelete

Seans Story: Paleo, Type 1 Diabetes & the Endurance Athelete Hey guys, Diane from Balanced Bites here! Many of you know me from my blog, around the web on Facebook and Twitter or from my Practical Paleo Seminars that I teach in gyms around the country. Well, what you may not realize is that I also coach clients 1-on-1 in their efforts to create diet and lifestyle plans that are unique to their needs and their own specific health conditions. Check out this story from one of my clients, Sean, who came to me back in August of this year looking for help making a Paleo diet work for his half-Ironman race and to get his health (ahem, blood glucose) to a much better, more stable place thereafter. Perhaps its fitting that my story starts in rainy Seattle, where Robb first started to develop his work on evolutionary-based nutrition. I was there last December, visiting my friend Erica on the way to Europe for soe desperately-needed travel and vacation. I had just quit my job in politics after a grueling few years (turns out I lack the necessary proclivity for bloodletting, torture, and self-flagellation that the job requires). Seattle was my first stop to rethink my life and my direction. Then it was off to Amsterdam to, uh, not think about my life and my direction, so to speak. Id known Erica since high schoolshes always been slim and athletic, and also happens to be one of the smartest people I know. She had recently started CrossFit and running marathons, both of which intrigued me as good paths toward great health (I would learn later this was naive, but more on that later). When we got to the discussion of diet, she told me that her diet was entirely grain-free. No bread. No pasta. She lived off the fat of the land, literally, to run marathons. I distinctly remember thinkin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Hyperglycaemia, or high as it is often called, means a higher than normal level of glucose in the blood. If your blood glucose gets very high (above 17mmol/l), you should always check for ketones in your blood or urine. If tests show ketones in two or more tests in a day or if you feel unwell (e.g. if you are vomiting) follow your sick day rules or seek medical advice if you are unsure. Continuing high blood sugar, especially if combined with ketones in the urine, must be taken seriously. Symptoms of hyperglycaemia Symptoms of highs are the same as those of untreated diabetes: thirst, frequent urination (peeing) and tiredness. The most common reasons for highs are a mismatch of insulin to the amount of carbohydrate eaten/drunk, but infection or illness can also send blood sugar high, and some people find they go high when they are stressed, frightened or excited. Having constantly high blood glucose levels increases the risks of developing complications of diabetes. When there are complications, the parts of the body most likely to be affected are: eyes, kidneys, peripheral nerves in the hands, legs and feet, the skin and large blood vessels. The check-ups you are offered at clinic are designed to pick up any signs of these complications as early as possible so any problems can be sorted out quickly. Maintaining a stable blood glucose level is sometimes very difficult for people on insulin. Many young people said that they found it easier to recognise hypo symptoms than highs, particularly when their blood glucose is only moderately high. If you do regular blood glucose tests rather than just relying on how you feel, you can keep an eye on exactly how your blood sugar is reacting and keep yourself within safe limits. Learning to control highs Some young people indicated Continue reading >>

Young Adult & Type 1 Diabetes

Young Adult & Type 1 Diabetes

Going to College If you are heading to College we recommend that you have a look at the ‘Type 1 diabetes -Tips for college life’ booklet. You will find some practical advice on managing Type 1 diabetes for new 3rd level students. Click on the link to download – Diabetes Tips For College Life or contact Diabetes Ireland and order a copy. It is also available at your college DARE office. This booklet was written in 2013 as a guide for those with Type 1 diabetes, for themselves but also as a recourse for new friends, colleagues and room mates to help them understand more about Type 1 diabetes. It also includes tips on what to do in the event of a hypo and how illness can be managed. Heading to college is daunting for most people. You may be excited, nervous, anxious and eager all rolled into one. It is a day you have planned for during the past year or two. You are now ready to embark on a new phase in your life and this usually involves spending a lot less time at home, or moving away from home for the first time. Moving away from home Until now home has probably more than likely been the natural hub of support for you as you grow towards adulthood. And family, siblings and friends at home will also have been a support for you when you are managing your diabetes. With the move away from home comes more responsibilities. The structure of the day will be very different. You will be familiarising yourself with your new lifestyle over the first few weeks. The route to success is planning as much as possible. Areas to look at may include: • Timing of lectures • Timing of meals, snacks and insulin • Availability of meals and snacks • Travel to and from college and mode of transport • Looking after your own diabetes supplies • Doing your own shopping • Sports Continue reading >>

How My Friend Helped Me Through My Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis

How My Friend Helped Me Through My Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis

How My Friend Helped Me Through My Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis I was running late when my friend stopped me outside the library a few days into the new term. I knew him through lectures and classes together, but we hadnt spoken during the holidays. After the exchanging the usual pleasantries, the standard question came up. So did you have a good Christmas? Get anything nice? Oh you know. The usual. Saw my family. Ignored my coursework. Got diagnosed with type 1 diabetes . A month after my diagnosis and this was the first person Id told about it, after my immediate family and my boyfriend. I was apprehensive about talking to people about it but some unknown feeling prompted me that it was the right thing to do. I found myself sharing the story of spending the run up to Christmas Day in and out of the hospital, loaded up with needles, insulin, glucose testing equipment and tips on how to control my obscenely high sugar levels over the holiday period. Five months later, his reaction remains the best that I have ever received in response to that story. Not only was he understanding and willing to listen to me, but he talked to me about his sister who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes years ago. He also shared with me all the practical tips that his family had picked up over the years, and even put me in contact with said sister who was more than willing to answer the dozens of seemingly insignificant questions that constantly occurred to me as a new diabetic. She was the first person with diabetes that I had talked to since my diagnosis, and it was a great relief to have someone close to my age to talk to about everything that was going on. Receiving such a positive reaction to my revelation made me much more relaxed about talking about my diagnosis with my various oth Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

We often look forward to changes of season, but if you have diabetes, you need to be extra careful when temperatures climb dramatically. Extreme heat can affect your blood sugar control. If you use insulin or if your treatment of blood sugars is inadequate, this can put you at higher risk. Often, worsening blood sugar control is the main concern. Depending on the situation and your level of physical activity, low blood sugars are also possible. Extreme temperatures can also damage your medications and testing equipment. I always remind my patients to take precautions to protect themselves and their supplies during both winter and summer. If a patient’s blood sugars are mostly higher than 250 mg/dl, I recommend improving blood sugar control before engaging in heavy physical activity — regardless of the climate and the temperature, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. How heat can affect you The extreme heat of summer affects blood sugar levels. How the heat affects your levels depends on what you’ve eaten, whether you’re well-hydrated and your activity level. If the heat and your activity make you sweat profusely, you may become dehydrated, leading to a rise in glucose levels. If you become dehydrated, your blood glucose levels will rise. This can lead to frequent urination, which then leads to further dehydration and even higher blood sugar levels — a kind of vicious cycle. Further, if the treatment includes insulin, dehydration reduces blood supply to the skin and, therefore, less absorption of injected insulin dosage. Adjusting your insulin dosage Most types of insulin can tolerate temperatures from 93 degrees F to 95 degrees F, but any higher than that and the medication will degrade rapidly. Attention should be paid to the insulin you are c Continue reading >>

Don’t Sweat It! Exercise And Type 1 Diabetes

Don’t Sweat It! Exercise And Type 1 Diabetes

The benefits of exercise are wide ranging. Regular physical activity can help people manage their weight, sleep better, reduce the risk of some diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart disease, and improve overall quality of life—among other proven benefits. People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) can gain the same benefits from exercise as anyone else. Yet studies show that many people with T1D do not engage in regular physical activity owing to a fear of hypoglycemia, or dangerously low blood-glucose levels. Exercise scientists and athletes with T1D alike say that people with T1D can exercise safely and effectively. It’s a matter of observing how your body responds to exercise, learning to balance insulin, food, and physical activity, and using research-supported strategies to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia during and after exercise. Managing hypoglycemia associated with exercise Sheri Colberg-Ochs, Ph.D., professor of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA, has both professional and personal interests in understanding the risks and benefits of exercise for people with T1D. As an exercise physiologist, Dr. Colberg-Ochs studies the relationship of exercise to diabetes and lifestyle management. She has also lived with T1D for 44 years, while staying fit and active. Dr. Colberg-Ochs notes that the risk of hypoglycemia during and after exercise can be managed. “There’s not a tried and true method that works for everyone. It’s very individual, based on the type of activity and your normal diabetes regimen,” she says, “but you can certainly reduce the frequency of hypoglycemia that’s associated with being physically active.” The risk of hypoglycemia is affected by the type, duration, and intensity of physical activity. Aerobic a Continue reading >>

A New Outlook On Training For A Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes

A New Outlook On Training For A Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes

A New Outlook on Training for a Marathon with Type 1 Diabetes This post is written by Greg Weintraub, Captain of Team Joslin for the 2016 Boston Marathon. Each week I attend a long run hosted by the Heartbreak Hill Running Company . These weekly runs have been central to my training for the 2016 Boston Marathon. As I mentioned in my previous blog post , these runs are an opportunity to spend time with my fellow Team Joslin runners and the time we spend together each Saturday morning is a tradition that I look forward to each week. Over the past few weeks, my runs have varied between 14 and 18 miles. These runs require intensive diabetes management from start to finish. At miles six and 11 of these long runs, I test my blood sugar. I slow down and stop on the side of the road. I prick my finger and wait for my glucometer to return a blood sugar. I then calculate how much fuel I need to eat to keep my blood sugar at a safe level. If I take too long of a break while checking my blood sugar levels then my muscles will start to cramp or I will lose momentum. Water is also an integral part of my long runs. Dehydration causes my blood sugar to go high and stay high. Water does not directly raise or lower my blood sugar. A lack of water while running long distances will negatively impact my blood sugar, though, so I am always sure to drink water each time I prick my finger. On these runs, I often find myself hurting, my legs shouting at me to stop or slow down. My body tells me to stop miles before I have completed each long run. I often want to stop or slow down emotionally, too. Just a quick walk would make me feel better, right? But I do not stop or slow down. I keep going despite the pain and the exhaustion I keep going because of the people with whom I run with. I feel a Continue reading >>

Type 1 Ultra | Endurance Sports In The Weird And Wonderful World Of Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Ultra | Endurance Sports In The Weird And Wonderful World Of Type 1 Diabetes

endurance sports in the weird and wonderful world of type 1 diabetes Ultramarathon nutrition for type 1diabetics This post is long overdue and has just been written on a long haul flight to the US. It needs mention of Babybel cheeses and hydration but other than that, I think it should be helpful to type 1 diabetics wondering how to approach long runs. Bulletpoint: condition yourself to do more with less. There is a fascinating discussion finally taking place around what we we, as in everyone in the developed world treat as nutrition. Having just watched That Sugar Film I think there is a chicken or the egg discussion to be had around whether that film started the wave or has jumped on the crest. One thing is sure, though, a number of lifestyle writers and blog-based journalists have been inspired by its content, even if they are now writing without acknowledging it as a source. So, to my point: race nutrition for type 1 diabetic ultramarathon runners. Niche huh? And what the f&%# does that have to do with the unfolding mainstream discussion around calorie sources as a contributor to health problems, rather than the chronically simplified discussion around calories in, and calories out? Read the rest of this entry If you were living with a medical condition that you had accepted as part of who you are now, that you even could embrace as you would a friend or a pet or even a troublesome family member what would you really want to do on finding out there might be the first thread of a real possibility for a cure? It seems a simple question. Surely, if you could have a cure, youd want to. Wouldnt you? But that act of hoping for a cure wanting your condition erased isnt that like admitting you havent really got comfortable with it? That you maybe havent accepted or embrace Continue reading >>

Running With Type 1 Diabetes

Running With Type 1 Diabetes

I run about 50-60 k per week and I have hard time managing my diabetes while on run. I sugar up at the beginning of my run. but after 50 min of I start feeling low and it's always worries me while I am running that how am I doing during run. This stops me from running Marathon. Please share your knowledge, experience, guidance. It will be appreciated. I really want to participate in marathon this year ! Thanks and if you are beginner runner check out my Tips D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I am a 68-year-old LADA, diagnosed in 2007 and, for the last 3-1/2 years, totally dependent on Lantus and MDI Humalog (previously I used only Lantus). I've been an average runner for more than 35 years. My only experience with marathons was pre-diabetes diagnosis (one each in 2004, 2005, 2006--I suspect my BG was already high in 2006). My experience as a diabetic runner may not be of any help. I run early in the morning. Unless I'm running a long distance (10 miles or more), I don't eat anything before or during the run (nothing since supper) unless my pre-run BG is below about 95. If I run fasting, my BG tends to remain fairly steady. If I eat about 15 carbs (non-fat Greek yogurt and a few blueberries), it rises by 20-30 at the end of the run. I apparently have enough stored glycogen to take care of my needs when I'm running. The only time I've done runs longer than 5 miles on a regular basis was on Sundays for about 3 months in early 2014 and early 2015 in preparation for a half marathon. If I ate my 15-carb snack before a long run, my BG was typically about the same at the end as at the beginning. For the actual half marathon in 2015, I was at 140 pre-run--anxiety-related BG spike before a running event. I ate my snack anyway, did the run in 2:15, and had BG of 199 at t Continue reading >>

Running

Running

Tweet Running can be an ideal form of exercise for people with diabetes as it helps improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin. This can be especially useful for people with type 2 diabetes to help combat insulin resistance. The great aspect of running that you don’t have with many sports is control, as running can be a form of exercise tailored to your demands, unless you are specifically entering races. Running can improve your health and help with losing weight in an extremely manageable way for people with diabetes, while providing immense satisfaction and reward in the process. General diabetes and running tips You should always ensure you carry a more than adequate supply of sugar, either in the form of glucose tablets or sugary drinks. Carrying medical identification is also essential if you are running for longer than a 60-minute period, as well as informing a loved one that you are going out for a run as hypoglycemia is always a risk. A running partner, alternatively, would be ideal. Running in the summer months is much more tempting due to the brighter, warmer conditions, but the risk of dehydration can occur during this period. If your blood glucose levels are too high to begin with, dehydration can occur, with runners urged to ensure they are at a stable level, somewhere between 7-10 mmol/l, before setting out. As a reference point for diabetes management, the demands from running are around 50 per cent greater than from cycling, when comparing energy exertion. Running with an insulin pump Running is one form of exercise for which wearing an insulin pump is completely suitable and very helpful as it is unlikely to be knocked and risk the tubing being snagged. Management for people at risk of hypos People at risk of hypos include anyone on insulin, sulphon Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Athlete

The Diabetic Athlete

In 1998, two-time Olympic gold medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr. was preparing for the Goodwill Games when his hands suddenly began to shake in the middle of practice. He shrugged it off; after all, he was training up to eight hours a day, burning calories out of the pool as well as through running, weightlifting and boxing. He downed some PowerBars and Gatorade to boost his blood sugar and went back to work. But then he began sucking liquids like a diesel truck, sometimes drinking four gallons of orange juice in one sitting. Soon he couldn’t make out the letters on a Pepsi can held at arm’s length. He had all the telltale signs of diabetes: extreme thirst, blurry vision and fatigue. When he was diagnosed, he was told that his swimming career was over. “The doctors said exercise was good in moderation, but not at the level I was at,” says Hall. Yet he continued to dive into his sport, revamping his diet and closely monitoring his condition for warning signs. And when he climbed out of the pool in Sydney last year, four more Olympic medals hung around his neck, two of them gold. Hall may be an exceptional case, but he shows that men can pursue active lifestyles, and even exceed their expectations, while managing diabetes. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif P Continue reading >>

Running With Diabetes: Part 1

Running With Diabetes: Part 1

Both children and adults like me who live with Type 1 diabetes need to be mathematicians, physicians, personal trainers, and dietitians all rolled into one. Mary Tyler Moore, JDRF International Chairman Clear your mind of cant. Samuel Johnson If you live and run with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) congratulations, youre awesome! If you dont, and you are reading this, then you are either a healthy runner (in which case, congratulations, youre awesome!) or a diabetic who is thinking about becoming a runner (in which case, congratulations, youre awesome!). To all you awesome people: welcome to my blog! Like some of you, I am a runner with T1D, and like some of you, I started out as a diabetic who decided to run. That was over thirteen years ago. 3 marathons, over 15 half marathons, numerous 10 milers and 10Ks, and over 15,000 training kilometers later, I feel like I am getting closer and closer to my ultimate goal: a flawless sub 4-hour marathon. In pursuit of this goal, I have made all the mistakes that can be made. I have run into walls (well, as a figure of speech) more often than I can remember, and Ive gone through every possible emotion, from euphoria to bitter frustration. Its all been worth it. And as it turns out, dear reader, its been good for you, too. Failure is a great teacher, and making mistakes builds experience. Experience I want to share with you, so you will get to achieve your goals faster than I did. After all why waste time figuring stuff out when you could spend it running? For those of you who dont quite get the concept, type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease, caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and (so far undetermined) environmental factors. There is nothing you can do to prevent T1D, and there is nothing you can do to get rid of it. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects your body’s use of glucose (a type of sugar you make from the carbohydrates you eat). Glucose is the fuel your cells need to do their work. You need glucose for energy. You also need insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose enter your cells so that it can be converted to energy. Here’s the problem: People with type 2 diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) can’t properly use or store glucose, either because their cells resist it or, in some cases, they don’t make enough. Over time, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, which can lead to serious health complications unless people take steps to manage their blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans, including nearly eight million who don’t even know they have it. You may be at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes if it runs in your family, if you are of a certain age or ethnicity, or if you are inactive or overweight. Type 2 diabetes vs. type 1 diabetes What’s the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce insulin. The immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes need life-long insulin therapy. Type 2 diabetes is much more common. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin properly or, in some cases, doesn’t make enough. It’s usually diagnosed in middle-aged or older adults, but anyone can develop type 2 diabetes. It can be managed through diet, exercise, and medication. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t use insulin as it should or when the pancreas doesn Continue reading >>

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