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Type 1 Diabetes Running Team

Team Diabetes: 2018 Team Diabetes - Chicago

Team Diabetes: 2018 Team Diabetes - Chicago

Team Diabetes is now a full team for the 2018 Bank of America Chicago Marathon! You can still fundraise for us by registering here. Thank you to all our 2018 runners, and impacting the lives of all those affected by diabetes! The American Diabetes Association will be participating in the 41st Bank of America Chicago Marathon on October 7, 2018 as a charity team,Team Diabetes! This will be our eighth year as an official charity, and we will once again be running for a life free of diabetes and all its burdens.Join us as we get fit, have fun, and fundraise for a meaningful cause! For more than 75 years, millions of Americans with diabetes have relied on the American Diabetes Association to help them fight discrimination, prevent diabetes and better manage their diabeteswhile we help fuel the vital research that produces breakthrough treatments and, one day, cures. When you join Team Diabetes, your fundraising support will help us stand beside the 30 million people living with diabetestoday and long into the future. To learn more about Team Diabetes, please contact Mahreen Mirza by phone at 312-346-1806 x6565 or email, [email protected] . Team Diabetes Chicago by Slidely Slideshow Benefits for Team Diabetes Bank of America Chicago Marathon Runners All Runners who run with Team Diabetes in the Chicago Marathon and raise the $1,000 minimum to support the ADA's mission will receive the same exclusive benefits! Pre-lottery guaranteed-entry runners must raise $1,000; post-lottery runners must raise $1,500. Note: Pre-lottery runners must raise 75% of required funds by the Friday of Race Day Weekend, while post-lottery runners must raise 90% of required funds by the Friday of Race Day Weekend (October 5, 2018). If these percentages of your funds are not met, your running bib w Continue reading >>

Team Type One Run

Team Type One Run

Mel biked across America with Beyond Type 1's Bike Beyond team. For someone whos always thought of themselves as not a runner, Ive done a surprising amount of events over the past few years. In 2013, I finally decided that I didnt want to let diabetes be the reason that I didnt do the things that scared me, so I made a resolution to run 2013km that year. Ive never looked back. Ive run everything from 5km to ultramarathons. Im not the fastest, and never will be. I love running, even when Im hating it. Looking for other diabadasses in Brisbane to show the world that diabetes cant hold anyone back - so if you love (or hate) running, or want to get started, or just want to hang out with other type 1s come along and join me! Sean is one of the nicest guys you'll meet. He's an engineer and is into trail running - he's done the Angeles Crest 100 miler - but is happy running easy with us mere mortals as well. Sean founded and leads the Bay Area running group in San Jose. He's also a Diabetes Sports Project Champion. I'm 46 years old, married and a father of two (an 11 year old son and 6 year old daughter), and we're living as a family in Hamburg, Germany. My type 1 showed up 16 years ago during my final exam at university (a really bad moment in time) where I studied economics and sociology. In my younger days I played water polo and later I did Karate for years. Ever since I can imagine I rode my bike, because I prefer riding my bike to driving. And this is still the case. With running I started ca 4 years ago and my favourite distance is between 5k and 10k. There are a lot of running events across Hamburg and I'll join some of them. Biggest challenges this year are a 16k around Hamburg Airport (in Sep-17) and two 12k bridge runs one in Hamburg and one in Stralsund (Eastern G Continue reading >>

The Incurable Runner

The Incurable Runner

Diabetes in the long run. My personal experience of what it's like to be a type 1 diabetic runner and triathlete. New post dedicated to Type One Run . A Haiku. Credit to Craig Stubing for the "Leave No Ones Behind" motto and James Mansfield for teaching me to count syllables. Somehow I got registered for the Dances With Dirt Devil's Lake 50K. Well, I guess I know how it happened. My youngest brother Chris, who had done the marathon at Devil's Lake twice, and who lives in Wisconsin, asked me if I'd like to come out and run it with him. We've met up to do races before, some of them described elsewhere in this blog. Chris has done at least a dozen marathons, but no ultra marathons. He was considering the 50K, I think, and I had always said that a 50K is really in the same category as a marathon, like a ten mile race is in the same category as a half marathon. But then, as I said in an earlier post in this blog, I ran the Relay Del Sol with a team of diabetic runners, and got inspired. One of the things I got inspired to do was to quick sign up for the 50K at Devil's Lake and call Chris. "Hey, Chris, I registered for the 50K. You better sign up before it fills up!" So Chris and I did the 50K last weekend. No big deal. We were only concerned about finishing. We were both under-trained. Chris continually said he was doing less than I was, but that's what he always does. Then usually he runs my butt off on race day. Thankfully, that didn't happen this time. Chris really was as out of shape as I was. We had to beat the cutoff by reaching the 25 mile point before 1 PM, 7:30 after the 5:30 AM start. We did it with minutes to spare, then walked it in. We went all over the country you see in the background. Overall, a nice trek through beautiful country with good company. We ran a Continue reading >>

Running A Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes

Running A Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes

How to Run a Half Marathon With Type 1 Diabetes My name is Jacob Seltzer, I am 20 years old, and a Type 1 Diabetic. I was diagnosed with diabetes on my half birthday, November 21, 2011 at the ageof 15. I have had diabetes for roughly 5 years and I do not let it get in my way. I am currently going into my junior year of college at Stony BrookUniversity as an athletic training major. Recently, I decided to start up my own blog . My reasoning behind this was to spread awareness of the disease,better educate people, and most of all serve as a peer to help newly diagnosed diabetics cope with their disease. This blog, among so many others online today, will have to serve us as we work together to find a cure for this disease. I have alsoentered a contest from Runners Worldmagazine, to be featured on the cover of the December issue! Please vote for me at the Runners World website!! Running 26.2 miles sounds pleasant right? Im sure many people reading this disagree. Pleasant isnt the right word to use for long distance running. However, it is one of the most rewarding things that I have ever experienced. One thing that I have learned is training for this distance is not an easy thing to do. In fact, mentally it can be very draining. All runners experience the highs and lows of running while training for a marathon (or any other race), however, as a runner with diabetes, you literally experience highs and lows with running. There is no such thing as a perfect training strategy since everyone is different, but a beginner plan is the way to start off. My mom bought me a book consisting of three training plans for half marathons and three training plans for full marathons all of which include a taper period (shortened distances by the end of the training). In order to truly unders Continue reading >>

How I Started Running With Type 1 Diabetes (after Saying I Dont Run For Years)

How I Started Running With Type 1 Diabetes (after Saying I Dont Run For Years)

How I Started Running with Type 1 Diabetes (After Saying I Dont Run for Years) Jennifer Christensen lives with type 1 diabetes and recently completed her first half marathon even though she always used to say, I dont run! She shares how she found the motivation to run (from her best friend), the mental barriers she overcame, how she trained, and what she did to manage her blood sugar during and after runs. This is a long post, but its a good one! Weve all heard the saying Never Say Never and thought that it was rather ridiculous to contradict yourself in the same sentence, or maybe that is just me.However, Ive even said it myself.In fact, I said it just recently when I completed a Half Marathon in L.A. with my best friend. To get this post, you should know that I am in an exercise competition with my best friend, Jenna, and I love how we keep it up.Weve been doing this for 3 years now, and to say we are competitive would be the understatement of the year/decade. So, starting in March of this year I stepped up my game to a whole new level.I had set a personal goal of dropping some weight and got myself a gym membership.Things were progressing nicely, and I was pleased to see results.A friend had even suggested that I should run a marathon, or half marathon and I said, I dont run.I will never do a marathon or even a half marathon. In June, Jenna and I went on one of our semi-annual Laverne and Shirley trips.It was a weekend of hiking, swimming, exploring underground lava tubes, yoga, and zip lining.The zip lining event will come back to bite me or be the best thing to happen. There were more than 30 zip lines suspended 15 to 80 feet in the pine trees.Now, a very important fact to know is that Jenna has a fear of heights.And not just a slight fear either.At one point we w Continue reading >>

Marathon Running And Diabetes

Marathon Running And Diabetes

"I’ve always been active – it’s part of my diabetes control,’ says Ed. ‘In preparation for London, I’ve already done a couple of half marathons and a triathlon. For me, running is what works. If you’re thinking about taking up exercise, do what you enjoy. I have grown to enjoy running – but, if you enjoy swimming or cycling, do that. Whatever you do, it all helps! Benefits of running "The benefits I gain from running and training include... more self-confidence larger friendship groups from clubs more connections at work through having common ground a very firm bum! Eating and running "I roll out of bed at 5.45am – I pull on my clothes, test my bloods (usually around 5 upon waking), and eat a banana and either a small portion of cereal or half an SiS energy bar. A seven-mile run before breakfast requires fuel, although I often find that much of the energy comes from the meal I’ve had the night before. My evening meal is always balanced and I’m careful never to skip meals. Before my run, I put the rest of the bar in my pocket as insurance in case my sugars go low due to the exercise. Generally, running drops my sugar levels by about 1 mmol per mile, which is why I eat a banana beforehand. They are ‘magic’ as they have 20-30g carbs in them – I give myself 1 unit of insulin to balance this. High-density energy bars provide the rest of the energy. I’ve worked out that seven miles of running can change my blood sugar as much as 7 mmol, which is why eating close to beginning a run is so important. On Sunday I tend to do a long run, and my food prep starts the night before. I will eat three times the normal amount of complex carbs on the Saturday evening – for example, 200g of brown rice (uncooked dry weight), meat to provide protein and then ve Continue reading >>

Type 1 Training Club Requirements

Type 1 Training Club Requirements

Live your most active life with type 1 diabetes Introducing a 16-week nutrition and fitness group coaching program that can transform your relationship with food, significantly increase your performance and recovery and give you the best blood sugar control you’ve ever had. If you are like most people with type 1 diabetes, then controlling your blood sugar can be a complete mystery. Even if you eat the same foods on a daily basis, your blood sugar responds differently, leaving you feeling frustrated and out of control. The truth is, your blood sugar responds to many environmental factors, and getting a handle on exactly what causes your blood sugar to rise and fall can be completely overwhelming... “Receiving real-time evidence-based fitness and diet coaching was invaluable because the experience allowed me to attain insights that left me feeling supported and generating better results than I had from simply working with my doctor and dietician. This coaching program is customized and offered by a coach living with type 1 diabetes, and that truly distinguishes this program from the rest.” “This program has helped a lot with my base level of anxiety. I’ve always wanted to exercise again, but was worried about hurting myself. Now, I have a plan in place that helps prevent lows and deal with them confidently if they happen. I went from being too tired to go for a walk to craving exercise—I get restless if I skip a day.” “Within three days of starting the first steps of this program, I could immediately feel a difference in my energy levels. Within 3 weeks, I had decreased my daily insulin requirement by 50% and for the first time in two years was able to complete a two hour endurance ride without being limited by a significant hypoglycemic episode.” David Continue reading >>

Presenting Sponsor For Beyond Type 1: New York City Marathon Team

Presenting Sponsor For Beyond Type 1: New York City Marathon Team

Home Health and Wellness Presenting Sponsor for Beyond Type 1: New York City Marathon Team Presenting Sponsor for Beyond Type 1: New York City Marathon Team Posted by Karrie Hawbaker On August 28, 2017 In Health and Wellness Were thrilled to announce that well be sponsoring the Beyond Type Run team at the world-renowned fitness event, the TCS New York City Marathon! Beyond Type 1 has been named an official charity partner of the marathon this year. Beyond Type 1 has played an important role in the diabetes community focusing on education and empowerment since 2015. We think its really inspiring that diabetes will be brought into the spotlight and are incredibly proud to have the opportunity to support Beyond Type Run. Medtronic will be sponsoring the group of individuals living with T1D who are running to break down stigmas and raise diabetes support. The team consists of a few first-time-marathoners, all the way to team captain, Robin Arzn who will be running for the 23rd time! (WOW!) The team has had diabetes a variety of time, from 3 years to twenty-eight years. Some will even be running with insulin pumps on their hips! This team embodies what we want for all PWD for each of you to have the ability to chase BIG dreams (whatever they may be) and not allow diabetes to hold you back. Stay tuned on both the Medtronic and Beyond Type 1 social media channels over the next few months to meet the runners and hear more about their inspiring stories. Race day is on November 5isnt this a fantastic way to kick off Diabetes Awareness month?!) Best of luck to each of the runners. Well be cheering for you every step of the way! Editors note: All 17 runners successfully completed the marathon! We are so inspired by their determination and resiliency. For more, check out these reso Continue reading >>

How To Fuel For A Long Run With Type 1 Diabetes

How To Fuel For A Long Run With Type 1 Diabetes

We recently got reader mail asking for help with balancing long runs, fueling, and Type 1 diabetes. Keith, a longtime runner, wrote in to tell us he was recently diagnosed with rare, late-onset Type 1 diabetes. Being diagnosed with Type 1 as an adult is rare in the sense that Type 1 is typically diagnosed earlier in life; the condition was once referred to as juvenile diabetes. Keith notes that during long runs, he takes a GU energy gel every 15 minutes, and he successfully fueled for a half-marathon using this formula. While Keith tolerates the GU and has designed it so he ends up with blood sugar levels just slightly above normal, he was wondering if there was another gel that might be better for diabetics—perhaps one that lasts longer. Or, he asks, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it?" Keith, I'm so glad you asked. As you know, there are many health benefits of exercise for athletes with diabetes (and we covered many of them here when discussing Type 2 diabetes). But unlike running with Type 2, running with Type 1 (especially long-distance running) requires more planning and precautionary measures. Type 1 diabetes accounts for only 5-10% of all cases, yet most avid athletes with diabetes fall into the Type 1 category. While athletes with Type 2 often make their own insulin and rely on changes to the diet and exercise (and maybe oral meds) to manage the disease, athletes with Type 1 have absolute insulin deficiency, which means that this chronic disease is treated with diet and exercise along with insulin injections. While most runners don't need to think twice about insulin or glucagon levels—or even glucose production during exercise—for the athlete with Type 1, careful consideration must be given to these factors before, during, and after each run. Many variable Continue reading >>

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes To Complete Cross-country Run

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes To Complete Cross-country Run

Athletes with type 1 diabetes to complete cross-country run Many people with type 1 diabetes think their condition will limit what they are able to do when it comes to physical activity. Overexertion can cause glucose levels to drop dangerously low, which may lead to a dangerous health situation. However, one group of athletes is working to show individuals with the condition what is possible when they manage their health and take active steps to control their blood sugar levels. Team Type 1 is currently undertaking a 3,000 mile relay event in which runners who have type 1 diabetes will collectively run across the entire U.S. The run will start in Oceanside, California and wrap up in New York City. You may be interested in these related articles: Nick Jonas on Flying the Diabetes Flag High! The set of athletes have previously competed in endurance bike races and other types of events. Representatives said their goal is to show young people with the condition that they can accomplish nearly anything they want as long as they make efforts to effectively control their blood sugar levels. "Since the inception of Team Type 1, our athletes with diabetes have been shattering the limits of what is possible," said CEO and founder of the group Phil Southerland. "We are also promoting exercise as a measure to prevent type 2 diabetes and better manage type 1 diabetes." The cross-country relay run will be completed by 10 different athletes who have type 1 diabetes. The team members have each competed in Iron Man challenges, the Boston Marathon, triathlons and other endurance activities. While these types of competitions would normally pose problems for glucose management in individuals with type 1 diabetes, the team wants to show that this doesn't have to prevent someone from getti Continue reading >>

Running Marathons With Type 1 Diabetes

Running Marathons With Type 1 Diabetes

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to finish a marathon? All 26.2 miles… For most people it is only a daydream. Add in the fact of having Type 1 diabetes and it seems like it would be impossible. In reality there are many people with diabetes who have completed marathons. One such person is Bill King. Bill was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 1984 and has run 20 marathons. Not only has he completed multiple marathons but he ran the prestigious and demanding Boston Marathon in a blazing three hours and nine minutes. Bill found some time to discuss his marathon experiences and how he has not allowed diabetes to get in the way of his dream. How do you prepare for the marathon? Like any sport that requires extreme endurance, the 26.2 mile marathon requires me to train my body to run for several hours. Daily practice requires building a base of mileage over several months and includes a periodic long run that will simulate in marathon distance (up to 20+ miles) as the race gets closer. Knowing when to rest and when to push myself during the last few weeks is vital to ensure the maximum performance in the race. I have found the key for me to perform at my best is to focus on tight control of my glucose and to learn how to consume glucose during my runs, both in my training and racing. Having an ability to check my BG frequently, adjust my insulin delivery with my insulin pump and enhancing my energy and glucose is part of the key for my success. Is the Boston Marathon more special than other marathons? The Boston Marathon is unique in that each runner who competes must qualify for entry by running a certified marathon course in a specified time (depending on your age group) up to 15 months prior to the April running of the Boston Marathon. Many years ago, Boston Continue reading >>

Type1 Running Team

Type1 Running Team

Boucle du Diabte Inspiration Community Running Diabetes Type1 Running Team Type1 Running Team: a team of runners and triathletes diabetes type1. With our diabetes and our common passion: to foot race, we federate. We distributed the 4 corners of France. Do not hesitate to join us ! Type1 Running Team was co-founded by Delphine and David Arduini Limousin, both type1 diabetics and sharing a common passion: the foot race and trail. The team, since grew and distributed to the 4 corners of France. Walkers, runners, trail runners, triathletes, we all diabetes type1 and motivated to move forward together. Since 2016, the team is affiliated with the French Athletics Federation. David & Delphine, les fondateurs de Type1 Running Team Our missions: LOG / SHARE / INSPIRE / AWARENESS We run and we share our diabetes management experiences via our social networks. Each has its tips and tricks that can help the other. We run all the races to meet us, to unite us, to have a good time together. We meet at our friendly jogging members organize in their area. We operate in national and international scientific meetings to bring the voice of the patient. We organize every year in late April LOOP OF DIABETES , sporting events and festive around the Diabetes and Diabetic where 100% of registrations are donated to the Search for Diabetes. We wear loud colors of diabetes to show that our companions should not be a hindrance to the realization of our projects, our lives. Our Website: Type1 Running Team And Team presentation video ptite Continue reading >>

Running With Diabetes: Tips To Stay Healthy On The Road

Running With Diabetes: Tips To Stay Healthy On The Road

Running With Diabetes: Tips to Stay Healthy on the Road Running With Diabetes: Tips to Stay Healthy on the Road It's possible to run, be active and even do marathons when you have diabetes. In fact, it may even help you. If you have diabetes, here are a few tips to help you get inspired, put your running shoes on, and hit the open road. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. There is also another type that occurs in pregnancy called gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is the most common with roughly 90 percent of diabetics with this type. Diabetes affects a huge number of the population, including 23 million adults and children in the United States (or 7.8 percent of the population) and about 2.5 million and an estimated half a million people who unknowingly have the condition in the United Kingdom. These numbers are on the rise particularly with the increasing rates of inactivity and obesity worldwide. Most shocking is the rising number of young people being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, which used to be a condition only associated with adulthood. When someone has Type 2 diabetes, their body doesn't make enough insulin or it doesn't use it properly. This is known as insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, which is responsible for controlling blood sugars, lipid and protein metabolism. People with Type 2 diabetes often have a strong family history and tend to be overweight with a high waist circumference, often a marker for intra-abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Eating a balanced diet and exercising to lose weight are key to caring for Type 2 diabetes. To achieve a balanced diet, a person should eat meals rich in fruits and vegetables, use healthy oils such as olive oil, and eat lean proteins such as chicken or Continue reading >>

The Gran Fondo National Series Announces The Team Type 1 Foundation As An Official National Charity Partner | Endurance Sports Wire

The Gran Fondo National Series Announces The Team Type 1 Foundation As An Official National Charity Partner | Endurance Sports Wire

ATLANTA, GA The Gran Fondo National Series (GNFS), a U.S. staple in the Gran Fondo format, is proud to announce the Team Type 1 Foundation (TT1) as an official charity partner for 2018. SONOMA, California Destination Races, producer of the Wine Country Half Marathon series, is proud to announce that the American Diabetes Association will join the series as the official National Charity Partner for 2016. The funds (Boulder, CO) Sansego, the triathlon coaching platform founded by three-time IRONMAN World Champion Craig Crowie Alexander, is honored to be named the official coaching partner with the Diabetes Sports Project. Launching on this years World Atlanta, GA (November 17, 2011) Team Type 1-SANOFI returns to Rwanda for a second year to compete at the 2011 Tour of Rwanda and spread the message that people with diabetes can live normal Wentzville, MO November 8, 2011 Despite grueling weather conditions including snow and rain, ten athletes from the Team Type 1-SANOFI running team, all who have type 1 diabetes, have reached the halfway mark This week, ten members of the Team Type 1-SANOFI running team will embark on the journey of a lifetime. The athletes, who all have Type 1 diabetes, will run 3,000 miles across America in an Atlanta, GA, September 13, 2011 Team Type 1, a global sports organization dedicated to radically changing the lives of people around the world with diabetes, today announced ten runners from its world class athletic WHAT: To commemorate the 2nd Health Summit ever in the history of the United Nations on September 19 & 20, the NCD Alliance will host Unite for a Healthy Future, an afternoon rally to engage REI and Charlotte Trek announce sponsorship of NC Adventure Race Series 26.2 hour Epic Event Near Morganton, NC August 27-28, 2011 Action Learning Continue reading >>

5 Tips For Running With Type 1 Diabetes

5 Tips For Running With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Robin Arzon Editor’s Note: Robin Arzon is a part of Beyond Type Run Team, which is sponsored by Medtronic. She is participating in the 2017 TCS New York City Marathon. I’m a Type 1 diabetic. That means my pancreas stopped producing insulin one day and I need insulin to live. It mostly sucks. I was diagnosed as an adult at the age of 32, after a month-long trip to India. I felt really dehydrated, got blood work at my mom’s urging, and boom, I needed insulin forever. There’s no known cause. Approximately 90% of adult diabetics are Type 2, which is generally caused by lifestyle factors such as activity level and food choices. No matter what kind of diabetic you are, I want you to know something: you’re a f*cking bad-*ss. My immediate thought when I was diagnosed was, How can I continue to run ultras? I then remembered my friend Stephen England, who is a very accomplished marathoner, ultrarunner, and fellow Type 1 diabetic (since the age of 14). Knowing he slayed the Leadville Trail 100 Run and other 100-milers was encouraging. I decided I was going to be unstoppable. Running with diabetes hasn’t always been pretty. It’s been trial and error every single day. Within 10 days of my diagnosis, I had all the technology available to assist with diabetes management. I use an OmniPod insulin pump (the white box on my arm or waist you see in photos) and a Dexcom glucose monitor, which alerts me to my blood glucose numbers. I firmly believe technology has kept me racing. I can adjust my insulin ratios for training, especially marathons and 3-4 hour long runs, without needing to inject insulin manually. More knowledge is power. Everyone is different, but I like to reduce my insulin slightly before a long run. I can run with 50-70 percent less insulin during Continue reading >>

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