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Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

Should We Have An Medical Alert Braclet Or Necklace On When Driving.........

Should We Have An Medical Alert Braclet Or Necklace On When Driving.........

You know I was wondering that the other day. My key ring has the medical emergency emblam on it and says Diabetic, I also have a card in my wallet that has my information saying I am a Diabetic who to contact and so forth. Although I have a small bag that carrys everything for road trips (ie. syringes, insulin, BS machine) I have syringes in my glove box. Looks lovely. I would be doomed. But I would take something like being stopped to court. If this hasn't happened to you in the past a police officer will 9 times out of 10 ask you if you are on medication or have an illness. ALWAYS HAVE GLUCOSE TABS IN THE CAR!!! they don't melt, actually taste pretty darn good. You can get a small bottle to carry or a large bottle for home and refills. I get this at Wal Mart. They also have gel's. If that isn't evidence I don't know what is. I would be asking the officer to get me my tablets so we can actually communicate. Good idea to have some diabetic ID on you. Good thing I had the HR folks call the NYS troopers, reportoing I am a diabetic whne I had my parking lot accident and drove a car at "47" withoiut nowing it was soi low!! , Thank God for their insight! Grandpa Bill yes i wear a medical bracelet all the time.its your way of letting people know you have health problems when you can't talk . it talks for you very big help if you were in accident. my has even my med i'm on for diabeties high blood pressure.i have a paper that folds up and goes inside the braclets little lid that screws to tighten down. i have my personal information written on it too. Absolutely should wear onethe one I like the best is plastic (like the yellow "LiveStrong" one made famous by Lance Armstrongonly mine is black and simply says "Type 1 Diabetic". It has saved me a couple times I have a necklace Continue reading >>

Our 5 Favorite Diabetes Medical Alert Jewelry

Our 5 Favorite Diabetes Medical Alert Jewelry

Today is the American Association’s Diabetes Alert Day and we thought we’d bring up one safety aspect related to life with diabetes. Do you wear a medical alert ID? If not, you’re certainly not alone but, you may want to take the time to consider picking one out today. First responders are trained to search your whole body for an ID of some sort. They are most commonly located on a necklace or bracelet so these are what they are most accustomed to finding. The Hope Paige website shares some very good reasons to wear a medical ID: A prompt and effective diagnosis that greatly assists proper treatment The ability to have a contact reached in an emergency The prevention of misdiagnosis which can lead to harmful medical errors or unnecessary treatment This is why the list of who should wear medical ID include those who live with a clotting disorder, take a blood thinner, live with dementia, Alzheimer’s, Kidney disease, high blood pressure, and even patients who have recently had surgery. People with diabetes, especially those on insulin are definitely recommended to wear an ID. Diabetes Forecast spoke to Sherita Golden, an endocrinologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. She told them, “If you’re acutely ill and unable to communicate, emergency medical personnel will see the alert and know to check blood sugar and treat you for hypoglycemia immediately,” or “with significantly elevated blood sugar, medical providers can start administering insulin.” What information does the ID need to display? First, that you have diabetes. But most important is whether you are insulin dependent, Golden says. Don’t assume first responders will spot an insulin pump. On the ID, specify “insulin pump” to help them locate it and stop the Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetic Emergencies

Tweet Diabetes can become serious in the short term if blood sugar levels become either too high or too low. The following information details what to do in an emergency. This covers low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), very high blood sugar (diabetic ketoacidosis) and what to do if you are left without your diabetes medication and/or supplies. What counts as a diabetic emergency? It can be a difficult area sometimes to know what counts as a genuine emergency. News reports in recent years have highlighted that a significant number of ‘999’ ambulance call-outs have not been necessary - for example to treat mild hypoglycemia which, in some cases, has been successfully treated befor e the ambulance has arrived. This isn’t to say that conditions, such as hypoglycemia, are not dangerous but that it’s important to know when a situation really is an emergency so that an ambulance is not unnecessarily called. When should I call an ambulance? An ambulance will be needed if someone has either very high or very low blood sugar levels that presents an immediate danger and neither they nor anyone around is confidently able to treat them. Ketoacidosis and Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome are both life threatening conditions. Hypoglycemia can also be life threatening in some cases. Someone with diabetes that is unconscious is one of the situations in which you should call for an ambulance. If you have doubts about whether the situation is serious enough to warrant an ambulance, call 111. Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia can become dangerous if it is not treated quickly, particularly if it is a result of an insulin overdose. Severe hypoglycemia is generally recognised as hypoglycemia involving: Convulsions (fitting) Unconsciousness Hypoglycemia can often be treated at Continue reading >>

Birth Control & Type 1

Birth Control & Type 1

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here. The subject of birth control with relation to Type 1 diabetes has always been a tricky subject, with inconsistent results. Hormones have been known to have an impact on blood glucose levels, but hormones affect everyone differently, so in terms of contraception, what works for one person might be completely wrong for another. Here are some observations and facts to keep in mind when considering your birth control options while managing your Type 1! IUDs There are a couple of different types of IUDs that will interact with the body differently. The first type is a copper IUD, which is inserted by your doctor, and can last for up to ten years. It is the copper itself that kills the sperm, preventing pregnancy. The other type of IUD (Mirena) is plastic, and it is a hormonal IUD. It contains the progestin hormone levonorgestrel, which is also used in the “morning after pill,” and it can last up to five years – half the time span of a copper IUD. There have been many reports of the hormones in Mirena causing severe blood sugar changes as well as acne, weight gain, and mood swings. IUDs in general are not recommended for women who contract pelvic infections easily. Women with Type 1 diabetes with higher A1Cs can be more susceptible to such infections, so it is important to be in excellent control of your Type 1 before considering any IUD. The Ring The ring is a flexible device that is inserted into the vagina and worn for three weeks. It is then replaced after one week of not wearing one. The hormones in the ring are absorbed directly into the vagina, therefore bypassing the digestive system all togeth Continue reading >>

Sex And Diabetes: Some Hard Questions

Sex And Diabetes: Some Hard Questions

Dear Sex and Diabetes: Im a disabled veteran. Type I diabetes ended my 14-year Army career in 1994. I got married in 1999. About 3 years later, erectile dysfunction (ED) reared its ugly head. I tried various pills to help with erections, but nothing worked. In the meantime, I lost my health insurance and had to fall back on Veterans Affairs (VA) health care . Last week I had a urology appointment and, among other issues, discussed getting help for ED. I was advised that before a treatment strategy could be implemented, Id be required to attend a regularly scheduled impotence class with other veterans. I was told that it would cover symptoms and various treatment options. I am not ecstatic to be required to attend such a thing! This is not a part of my life that I take pleasure in sharing with others. In fact, the more I think of it, the more appalled, humiliated, and furious I become. Before I really go off the handle about this, am I right in thinking that this type of forum is not really an appropriate clinical practice, or am I just being hypersensitive? If I am right, to whom should I voice my concerns? If I do attend, can I wear a burkha to hide my face? Impotence class, huh? We thought wed heard it all. Support groups and classes can be good things, and the VA does provide some good care, but sexual function is not usually the time, place, or subject for group medicine. We did a Google search for impotence class and got exactly zero appropriate results. Theres no such thing. We know why theyre doing this, of course. Theyre setting up barriers to care and hoping you give up. If they wanted to help, they could just hand you a brochure. It would be cheaper and more effective. You mentioned pills not working. The main ED pills, Viagra ( sildenafil ), Cialis ( tadalaf Continue reading >>

Flo Simba: In The Boxing Ring With Type 1 Diabetes

Flo Simba: In The Boxing Ring With Type 1 Diabetes

Flo Simba: in the boxing ring with type 1 diabetes From a softly spoken, humble athlete with type 1 diabetes to a gladiator in the boxing ring, this is the story of Flo Simba. Type 1 diabetes did not prevent former International Boxing Organisation (IBO) World Youth Heavyweight Title Holder, Flo Simba, returning to the professional boxing arena on Monday 13th April at Emperors Palace. He scored his first win in three years forcing Big Ben Malumba from the DRC to quit in the fourth round. Following the fight, the ever-modest Flo said, I feel humbled and blessed to go through this journey. I have learned a lot on and off the sports field, and have met great individuals that have taken the initiative to help me get to this point. I was a little shy about stating publicly that I have diabetes , but I have seen and experienced the family at the Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology (CDE). I am proud to have diabetes, as I can see what my efforts are doing to the younger generation, not only to those with diabetes, but also to those with other medical conditions. At the end of the day, we all want to be treated equally, on and off the sports field. Win or lose, we have taken a step in the right direction to better ourselves, regardless of the outcome. Flo "The Demolition Man" Simba takes on "Big Ben" Malumba at Emperor's Palace Read: Cardio and resistance training helps to manage diabetes Flo was mindful to thank all those who had assisted him to reach this turning point in his career. I would like to give a big thank you to Alberto Fogolin for his guidance and support. He has truly been a driving force in helping me to get to this point. His guidance brought me to the CDE - I have no doubt that this is a family of people / specialists that loves what they do. Also, under hi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness

Diabetes Awareness

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), or simply, diabetes, is a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body's ability to produce and/or use insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Only 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children with type 1 diabetes can learn to manage their condition and live long, healthy, happy lives. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Millions of Americans have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and many more are unaware they are at high risk. Some groups have a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes than others. Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders, as well as the aged population. In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary for the body to be able to use glucose for energy. When you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it can lead to diabetes complications. *Sources: From American Diabetes Association, All orders are shipped out same business day if ordered before 3pm EST. There is a $10.00 minimum purchase per order. We ship fast! All orders arrive with Continue reading >>

Why The Blue Circle?

Why The Blue Circle?

I can't quite remember who asked me, but in front of San Francisco City Hall last Friday evening, during our World Diabetes Day celebrations, somebody pointed to my pin and asked, "Why the blue circle, anyway? What does that mean?" They also wanted to know why the logo didn't have the world "diabetes" stamped across it: "Who's going to recognize that this stands for diabetes?!" For goodness' sake, it's supposed to be like the ubiquitous pink ribbon for breast cancer, red ribbon for AIDS, or yellow ribbon for bring-home-the-troops. Setting the issue of why it's blue and a circle aside for a moment, can't we all agree that a symbol that speaks for itself is better than having to pin the word "DIABETES" on your lapel? I was especially surprised to discover that folks from the local chapter of the ADA (American Diabetes Association) weren't at all familiar with the blue circle campaign. I sort of forgave them for it last year, since it was still very new then, but now I'm thinking that that group — and this country at large, which doesn't play up World Diabetes Day a fraction as much as the rest of the world — may be suffering from some classic "not invented here syndrome." When you go to the ADA's website right now, for example, you see "American Diabetes Month," but nada on WDD. I hereby proclaim this Call to Action for next year's WDD: Let's do it up, right, America! And that means you, ADA! And that means you, Mainstream Media! This awareness campaign is gaining traction, with the likes of T1 rockstar Nick Jonas on board, but it seems like we have a long way to go to catch up with the Brits, the Germans, or the Australians, for example. And now for the Why Blue? And Why a Circle? I know from my previous research that this symbol was the brainchild of Kari Rosenfeld Continue reading >>

Why Is One Of The Symptoms Of Diabetes A Dark Ring Around The Neck?

Why Is One Of The Symptoms Of Diabetes A Dark Ring Around The Neck?

Jessica Zbidi , studied at Master of Health and Science Answered 1w ago Author has 132 answers and 23.4k answer views You're overweight. Even being just 10 to 15 pounds overweight can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If your child is overweight, make sure his pediatrician tests him, because type 2 diabetes is on the rise in kids. The encouraging news is that losing just 5% to 7% of your body weight can reduce your risk of diabetes, according to research from the Diabetes Prevention Program. Testing usually involves screening your blood for high glucose (sugar) levels. If they're too high, you could have either type 1 or type 2. (See box, right, for explanations of the two types.) Your doctor will most likely be able to sort it out based on your age and symptoms. In some cases, you may also need to see an endocrinologist (specialist). You're constantly running to the bathroom. "If your body doesn't make enough insulin [a hormone that carries glucose into your cells to give them energy]," which can happen with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, "glucose builds up in your bloodstream and comes out in your urine," explains Janet Silverstein, MD, chief of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Florida. Because you're urinating a lot, you'll probably also be very thirsty and drinking more than usual. Your vision is blurry. High blood sugar levels cause glucose to build up in the lens of your eyes, making it harder for you to focus. This could mean that you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. You're losing weight for no apparent reason. This is usually a sign of type 1 diabetes, but it sometimes happens with type 2. When the body can't make insulin, glucose (sugar) from food can't be used by the body's cells for energy or stored, says Dr. Silverstein. In addition, Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Case Of Emergency (i.c.e.) Card Pack

Diabetes In Case Of Emergency (i.c.e.) Card Pack

1 x DIABETIC ICECard with writable reverse 2 x Matching key rings with writable reverse for one emergency contact *NEW* 2 x Matching vinyl stickers in 2 different sizes *NEW* By popular demand we have created a specific card for Type 1 Diabetes. This is available in the Medical ICE section ( click here ) and as an option in all our SPECIAL OFFER multi-packs of 2,4,6 & 10 If you suffer from diabetes then you run increased risk of becoming unwell rapidly and being unable to speak for yourself when medical professionalsor anyone who comes to your aid. If you can be quickly identified as a diabetic then the cause of your symtoms can be correctly diagnosed and treated quickly.An ICE Card could provide this invaluable information in a timely manner. Plain and simple, an ICEcard is a card you carry with you everywhere you go. If you are ever in an emergency situation and are unable to speak for yourself, your ICEcard holds all the important information required by first responders to ensure your medical needs are properly and safely met. It also holds the contact details of the people youve selected to be notified just as the card says - in case of emergency. Cards are supplied in packs with matching Key Rings and stickers which help to alert first responders that you are carrying an ICEcard. The card is made of durable PVC with a fully writable reverse surface. Card dimensions are 54 x 86mm with a thickness of only 0.76mm (Same as your bank card). The ICEcard has been designed with the advice of first aid professionals, and with simplicity in mind. The words IN CASE OF EMERGENCY are displayed in bright, bold text along the top right hand corner of the card along with the International (ISO) symbol for First Aid. Do you have multiple medical conditions or a complex medical hi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

This is the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet, while the blue circle became the global symbol in 2007, it’s been fighting a battle to gain that recognition among diabetes organizations in the U.S. Why does that matter? Think pink ribbon. You thought breast cancer, didn’t you? That’s the power of one unifying symbol for a disease. Such a symbol can potentially generate greater prevention and care efforts, treatment advances, and more funding for research and a cure. The Blue Circle was created by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2006 as part of a campaign urging the United Nations to pass a resolution to recognize diabetes as a serious global health threat. The IDF was successful. According to the International Diabetes Federation, UN Resolution 61/225 recognizes diabetes as debilitating and costly, and encourages all nations to develop prevention and treatment policies. It also designates November 14 — the birthday of Frederick Banting, one of insulin’s discoverers — as World Diabetes Day to be recognized by the UN. The blue circle became the official logo mark for World Diabetes Day, and the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet only the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) adopted the Blue Circle as such. American Association of Diabetes Educators Sandra Burke, AADE’s President, said, “When you see the pink ribbon, the automatic recognizable symbol for breast cancer, you’re reminded breast cancer is serious. When people look at the Blue Circle we want them to be able to say, this is about diabetes, a disease that kills even more people than breast cancer. We need to solve this.” “By universally accepting a symbol for diabetes,” says Burke, “we have the beginning of developing a unified message that diabetes is serious Continue reading >>

Identification Of De Novo Synthesized And Relatively Older Proteins: Accelerated Oxidative Damage To De Novo Synthesized Apolipoprotein A-1 In Type 1 Diabetes.

Identification Of De Novo Synthesized And Relatively Older Proteins: Accelerated Oxidative Damage To De Novo Synthesized Apolipoprotein A-1 In Type 1 Diabetes.

1. Diabetes. 2010 Oct;59(10):2366-74. doi: 10.2337/db10-0371. Epub 2010 Jul 9. Identification of de novo synthesized and relatively older proteins: accelerated oxidative damage to de novo synthesized apolipoprotein A-1 in type 1 diabetes. Jaleel A(1), Henderson GC, Madden BJ, Klaus KA, Morse DM, Gopala S, Nair KS. (1)Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. Comment in Diabetes. 2010 Oct;59(10):2358-9. OBJECTIVE: The accumulation of old and damaged proteins likely contributes tocomplications of diabetes, but currently no methodology is available to measurethe relative age of a specific protein alongside assessment of posttranslational modifications (PTM). To accomplish our goal of studying the impact of insulindeficiency and hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes upon accumulation of old damaged isoforms of plasma apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA-1), we sought to develop a novelmethodology, which is reported here and can also be applied to other specificproteins.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: To label newly synthesized proteins,[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine was intravenously infused for 8 h in type 1 diabeticparticipants (n = 7) during both insulin treatment and 8 h of insulin deprivationand in nondiabetic participants (n = 7). ApoA-1 isoforms were purified bytwo-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) and assessment of protein identity,PTM, and [ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine isotopic enrichment (IE) was performed bytandem mass spectrometry.RESULTS: Five isoforms of plasma ApoA-1 were identified by 2DGE including ApoA-1 precursor (pro-ApoA-1) that contained the relatively highest IE, whereas theolder forms contained higher degrees of damage (carbonylation, deamidation) andfar less IE. In type 1 diabetes, the relative ratio of IE of[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine in a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Bracelets - Buy Silicone Wristbands For Fundraising

Diabetes Awareness Bracelets - Buy Silicone Wristbands For Fundraising

Diabetes Awareness wristbands from Amazing Wristbands are completely unique in nature and these bracelets are made of 100% silicone and will not snap off or slit easily. Whether you want one or hundreds, amazingwristbands.com offers trendy, high-quality and affordable silicone wristbands for any use. Diabetes is a chronic, terminal disease that occurs when the body doesn't fabricate enough insulin which leads to an excess of sugar in the blood. To simply put it, this disease is a silent killer. There are three different types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. Recent survey as shown that there are 23.6 million people in United States were infected by this disease and 7.8 percent of the overall population, have diabetes. Of those, 17.9 million have been diagnosed and 5.7 million are living with the lack of awareness. About 246 million of the world population is affected with diabetes. The main cause for diabetes as per surveys suggests that central obesity or apple shape of the body and insulin resistance is the primary cause. An estimated amount of 3.2 million of the world population is killed by this disease every year. There is no early symptom that helps you to realize that you are affected by diabetes. However, signs of feeling thirsty quite often are the commonest early symptom and this doesn't necessarily mean that you are affected by diabetics. This disease is the number one cause for kidney failure in the world. The disease is growing faster and it is high time we wake up to its threat and start spreading awareness with our diabetes bracelets. Show your support for people who are affected by this cruel disease by wearing awareness wristbands with dedicative messages. There are more than 50 ways to prevent or control this cruel disease if in c Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

We all know November is Diabetes awareness month, and November 14th is “World Diabetes Day.” But what is the meaning of the “blue circle” and why do we celebrate and advocate for diabetes so much this month? I asked Keegan Hall, the President of the Young Leaders in Diabetes Program, to talk a bit about the history. Many causes and conditions have a colored ribbon to symbolize the cause. In the diabetes community, we have done something very different—a blue circle. The blue circle is the universal symbol for diabetes. Until 2006, there was no global symbol for diabetes. The purpose of the symbol is to give diabetes a common identity. It aims to: Support all existing efforts to raise awareness about diabetes Inspire new activities, bring diabetes to the attention of the general public Brand diabetes Provide a means to show support for the fight against diabetes What is the history of the blue circle? The icon was originally developed for the campaign that resulted in the passage of United Nations Resolution 61/225 “World Diabetes Day.” The campaign for a United Nations Resolution on diabetes was a response to the diabetes pandemic that is set to overwhelm healthcare resources everywhere. The campaign mobilized diabetes stakeholders behind the common cause of securing a United Nations Resolution on diabetes. The United Nations passed Resolution 61/225 ‘World Diabetes Day’ on December 20, 2006. Why a circle? The circle occurs frequently in nature and has thus been widely employed since the dawn of humankind. The significance is overwhelmingly positive. Across cultures, the circle can symbolize life and health. Most significantly for the campaign, the circle symbolizes unity. Our combined strength is the key element that made this campaign so special. The Continue reading >>

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