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Type 1 Diabetes Natural Birth

'first Natural Birth' For Diabetic Woman With Artificial Pancreas

'first Natural Birth' For Diabetic Woman With Artificial Pancreas

'First natural birth' for diabetic woman with artificial pancreas These are external links and will open in a new window Image caption Catriona Finlayson-Wilkins had her son after wearing the device to keep her blood sugar levels normal A diabetic woman has become the first in the world to give birth naturally after using an artificial pancreas while pregnant, experts have said. Catriona Finlayson-Wilkins, 41, of Knapton, Norfolk, gave birth to son Euan on Tuesday at the Norfolk and Norfolk University Hospital. She is also the first woman to give birth after using the device outside the main research site in Cambridge. Ms Finlayson-Wilkins said she was "thrilled" by her son's safe arrival. The new mother-of-two has Type 1 diabetes and wore the piece of kit throughout her pregnancy to produce insulin and prevent symptoms of the disease. Three other mothers have previously given birth in Cambridge after using the device but by caesarean section. Image caption The artificial pancreas is made up of a glucose monitor, digital controller and insulin pump An artificial pancreas device system (APDS) is a small portable piece of equipment designed to carry out the function of a healthy pancreas. It helps to control blood glucose levels using digital communication technology to automate insulin delivery. An APDS is worn on the body during pregnancy and has a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), a digital controller and an insulin pump. Image caption The device carries out the function of a healthy pancreas in controlling blood sugar levels Ms Finlayson-Wilkins, who is a face and body painter and has also decorated models for local charity Break's GoGo gorilla and dragon art trails , said: "I'm thrilled. "It's a huge weight off your mind after being pregnant and diabetic, which is r Continue reading >>

C-sections Vs. Natural Birth In Diabetic Moms

C-sections Vs. Natural Birth In Diabetic Moms

Childbirth and diabetes were once considered mutually exclusive. Thankfully, those days are over. But aiming for a healthy baby — and an uncomplicated birth — when you're living with diabetes is still a very tall order. It can be scary. And no one really wants to have a C-section, right? (I sure didn't, x3). Today, D-author and fellow mother of three Amy Stockwell Mercer joins us once more for a special report on new research providing insight into the precise effects of the Big D during childbirth. Special to the 'Mine by Amy Stockwell Mercer The myth that women with diabetes can't have babies is almost extinct. Shelby's premature death in the movie Steel Magnolias has slowly been replaced by images of healthy, vibrant women like former Miss America Nicole Johnson and fellow D-blogger Kerri Morrone Sparling as they navigate diabetes, pregnancy and motherhood. We've come a long way in understanding the importance of prenatal care for women with diabetes and as a result, more women are having healthy babies than ever before. However, 45%-70% of these pregnancies result in cesarean births and until now, no one could explain why. Researchers at the University of Liverpool have recently discovered that women with diabetes have "impaired uterine contractility." That means that even if we push for hours, some of us may never succeed. This groundbreaking research is based on 2010 United Kingdom government statistics, which show a high induction of labor rate (39%) and a high C-section rate (67%) in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (compared to 21% of the general maternal population). "We need to think about the enormously high C-section rate rather than just accepting it," says co-author Dr. Susan Wray. "As scientists we asked the question, could it be that these wome Continue reading >>

Natural Birth: Conquered With Type 1 Diabetes, Polyhydramnios, Macrosomia, And Shoulder Dystocia

Natural Birth: Conquered With Type 1 Diabetes, Polyhydramnios, Macrosomia, And Shoulder Dystocia

The night before Kates birthday, I left work early. Id been having contractions for weeks, but something was different that night. I couldnt put my finger on it, but knew I needed to get home and get to bed. A little background: I was getting so many contractions due to having severe polyhydramnios. I had almost double the amount of amniotic fluid than a normal pregnancy would have. The doctor had placed me on Nifedipine to slow the contractions in the hopes of getting me to 37 weeks, which I was still 5 days away from. That night, I couldnt sleep. I literally did not sleep one wink. I was beyond uncomfortable so full, so tight, so restless. I tried every possible position, on every piece of furniture. I tried walking, reading, relaxation tapes, and solitaire. Nothing worked. This was a whole new level of discomfort; I had crossed into the miserable. As the morning sunlight filtered through my living room windows, and I was faced with another day of tortuous, preggo anguish, I broke down. I cried that cry of frustration, of discouragement. That cry when you realize there is nothing you can do to change your situation. All you can do is wait and endure. And pray. So I prayed, out loud a desperate plea through my tears: God please. Please help me. Give me a leak. Something. Anything. Relieve this pressure in my belly. I cant do this much longer. I shuffled into my bedroom, plopped into bed and, amazingly, I fell asleep. About an hour later I awoke and found myself lying in a puddle. Ummm. What. Is. This. My water?! Oh my gosh. Oh my goshDont panic. I slowly got out of bed to use the bathroom and fluid gushed out of me and proceeded to gush with every step I took. I hurriedly walked across the house to the hubs office and, through my shaking voice and trembling body, info Continue reading >>

'i'm A Type 1 Diabetic Woman Who Has Given Birth To Two Healthy Children.'

'i'm A Type 1 Diabetic Woman Who Has Given Birth To Two Healthy Children.'

'I'm a Type 1 diabetic woman who has given birth to two healthy children.' 'I'm a Type 1 diabetic woman who has given birth to two healthy children.' I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of three years old. I have had diabetes for the last 30 years of my life, and have always found that, whilst the condition can be an inconvenience at times, it has never really stopped me from doing anything I wanted to. I have often found that news stories in relation to people with diabetes often show the downsides of diabetes rather than positive stories; therefore I wanted to give a positive story of being a Type 1 diabetic woman whom has given birth to two healthy children in a slightly different way to the general stories heard. In 2004 I gave birth to my daughter at 38 weeks in hospital, but without the need for the glucose/insulin drip which I had previously agreed with my obstetrician. I had a reasonably quick three and a half hours' labour, and my daughter weighed in at 7lbs and 7oz. To get to this point was not easy and in order to control my sugar so that my HbA1c was within the recommended range meant I often had up to eight injections a day (two is my normal amount), test my blood glucose levels frequently and go for all the extra scans as expected. I was determined however that whilst this was hard work, the end result was worth it. I did have some disagreements along the way with some medical professionals, but thankfully there was a diabetic consultant at my hospital who supported me and the way I intended to manage both my pregnancy and labour. Following the birth of my daughter, I subsequently fell pregnant again nine months later. This time I was very keen to have a home birth, mainly because there had been no complications in my first pregnancy, and seco Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Natural/out Of Hospital Birth - Mothering Forums

Type 1 Diabetes And Natural/out Of Hospital Birth - Mothering Forums

I'm type 1 and I know of a few rare T1D women who have managed NCBs or VBACs. One woman I know had a home waterbirth with her second child a few weeks ago, and there is a T1D woman here on MDC who had an attempted HBAC recently. These are rare cases, but IMHO, that's largely because change is so hard to achieve. Technology moves so fast in diabetes -- much faster than clinical research and opinion. It wasn't really so long ago that T1D women were living within the Steel Magnolias paradigm. (In the film, Julia Roberts' character has type 1 and is strongly discouraged from having a baby.) When I was diagnosed, my parents were told I might not ever have children. The landscape of treatment options is completely different now. We have good insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitoring systems, new synthetic insulins that more closely mimic that which is produced by human pancreases, and so on. It's highly possible to have a healthy pregnancy and baby, but the fear remains. I think the whole CSII (insulin pump) vs. IV insulin and dextrose during labour is kind of crap. I'm actually doing some academic work on this that might turn into an RCT, because, quite frankly, right now it's very much dependent on the whims of the individual care providers. There is no good evidence either way. But labor is not a well-controlled process. It is taxing on the body and increases the body's demand for glucose. In my opinion, insulin-dependent diabetics are much more safely cared for in the hospital. I wonder if you were more aware of the technology that is available to (and used by) many T1D women these days, if you would find that your opinion, while common, does not stand up to careful scrutiny? I have lived with this disease for 25+ years. If you've been doing it for years, blood sugar Continue reading >>

Labour And Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Labour And Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Your birth experience may be different to the one that you had expected, and this can be hard to come to terms with. Finding out what might happen could help you feel mentally prepared for what may lie ahead. It can help to remember that although the birth itself is important, it is just one step in the journey towards having your baby. Where to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes If you have diabetes, it is recommended that you give birth in a hospital with the support of a consultant-led maternity team. It is not unusual for babies of mothers with diabetes to be larger than normal, which could lead to birth difficulties such as shoulder dystocia (in which the baby’s shoulder gets stuck during the birth). This means that options such as home birth are unlikely to be recommended. When to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes You will be advised to give birth early if you have diabetes. This is to reduce the risk of stillbirth. It is recommended by NICE that women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and no other complications should give birth between 37 weeks and 38 weeks +6 days – either by being induced or having a planned caesarean. If you have any complications that pose a risk to you or the baby, you might be offered an even earlier delivery. 'I had always been aware that I would be on the ward for high-risk cases. I am so grateful to be pregnant, I’m not going to complain about stuff like that. If there is an issue, I would rather be ready for it.' Svenja, mum-to-be How to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes As the recommendation is to give birth by 38+6 weeks, you are likely to be offered an induction or a caesarean section. Diabetes is not in itself a reason that you cannot have vaginal birth. Unless there are other complications there is no reason this should Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Home Birth, By Victoria S

Type 1 Diabetes And Home Birth, By Victoria S

Type 1 Diabetes and Home Birth, by Victoria S Victoria is a Type 1 Diabetic, who researched her condition thoroughly and decided that this should not automatically dictate her maternity care. You can read more about Diabetes and Homebirth elsewhere on this site; I am very grateful to Victoria for this well-researched and thorough article. I have been a Type 1 diabetic for the last 30 years and at the age of 27, I fellpregnant with my first child (2003). For me, diabetes has always been no more than aninconvenience which I have had to accept and incorporate into my lifestyle. However, when I reflect back on the difficult circumstances that surrounded the birthof my first child and the poor attitude of the NHS towards my desire to give birth to mysecond child (2005) at home, I felt that the time was right to try and give some weightto the growing argument that diabetic mothers (if not all mothers) should be givenmore choice in the way they manage their pregnancy. I spoke to several organisationsspecialists in providing information for diabetics but none of them were prepared topublish an article on homebirths because they did not want to encourage homebirths intype 1 diabetics. I believe a lack of information in this field is part of the problem with the general attitudeof healthcare professionals to diabetic mums who do not want to follow the standardprocedures. So this is my story: When I fell pregnant for the second time in 2005 I decided that I would look atthe possibility of having a homebirth even though I was a type 1 diabetic I felt it wassomething that could be possible. My reasons for wanting a home birth came from my experience of having my daughter inhospital in 2004. I had had a relatively trouble-free pregnancy. My HBA1Cs (a measure of average blood glucose Continue reading >>

Big Baby Blues

Big Baby Blues

A blog about Type 1 Diabetes and Mostly Natural Pregnancy and Childbirth Hello from the other side of baby fog! This one was especially sweet. Pregnancy was so psychologically miserable, and I think the physical recovery took longer, too. The fact that he was out hereand not in thereany more was so great. He makes me ridiculously happy, and he hardly ever cries. The smile on his 7-year-old brother's face when he looks at him, the 2-year-old's voracious appetite for holding him, the 6-year-old's sense of duty in keeping him from crying, and the 4-year-old's willingness to attempt to change his diaper... it's just awesome. My husband even put the Moby wrap on, for the first time!, to hold him today. I know I've posted about postpartum diabetes management before, and I'm trying to figure out why I get so bad at controlling my blood sugars after baby is born. I think what happens is that during pregnancy you are excessively diligent about your blood sugars because it's not you that depends on them being good, it's a teeny tiny little person that you just can't help but love. So you whip yourself into shape and do everything you can to bathe your child in a perfectly temperate glucose environment. After the baby's born, you start taking care of baby in other ways, and your blood sugars just aren't a part of this baby's life anymore. (Except when your blood sugar is too low for you to coherently care for the baby. Self-care can save lives!) At this point, the only person it matters to is you, and you know that 170 mg/dL for a few hours isn't going to kill you. Plus, your brain can only handle so many details. Carb counting gives way to diaper changes, bolus ratios and insulin sensitivities give way to burping techniques, checking the sensor gives way to being very, very, ver Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - C-section Vs Natural Birth

Type 1 Diabetes - C-section Vs Natural Birth

Type 1 Diabetes - C-section VS natural Birth I am type 1 diabetic and i am currently 29 weeks pregnant. I am starting to really think about the birth of my lil princess, and as much as i would absoloutly LOVE to deliver naturally, im am slowly coming round to the fact that I may just need to have a c-section... so heres my question: What are you ladies doing?? i am beginning to feel a bit more comfortable if i actually ELECT to do a ceaser rather than try and then need an emergency c-section.... i jsut dont know. ive asked my drs and watnot but they have tip toed around the question, i think they are holding off a bit longer till im a bit further on, but i really wanna make my decision soon. I have my 30 week scan on the 10th July so will know more on how bubs is growing and wat not. but i still keep going back to ..... I would rather plan a c-section than need one suddenly please help and give me your advice on either wat you have done previously or wat you plan to do?? This is all I know after a c section there is a higher risk of your uterus rupturing during in labor they say you should wait to years after a c section to fall pregnant of you want to try naturally because of the scaring ( this is what I was told after my daughter) but that's all i know Thanks ladies I really appreciate the advice, I'm still a bit confused and overwhelmed especially as this topic can cause some very crazy and opinionated views ..... I feel that I defiantly could do it naturally but I also was diagnosed as a britall diabetic, which causes me to be a lil ore scarred on the whole will I be ok side of things..... My levels are going really well at the moment which I'm very proud of, so I'm gonna sit on it for a bit longer. Viper bunny I'm with u on the whole drs are very blah say at the m Continue reading >>

Labor, Delivery + After With Type 1 Diabetes

Labor, Delivery + After With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Pamela Hoffman, MPH Editor’s Note: If you are pregnant and have Type 1, take this survey on Glu and help field research for future generations of mothers. Can I just pat you on the back for a bit, Mama? You are doing an amazing job with your pregnancy! You have assembled a medical team you trust to guide you throughout the remainder of your pregnancy, courageously navigated the fluctuating blood sugars and hormones that come along with the first and second trimesters, and you’re now waddling around with the best of them! Your baby is so lucky to have a mother who loves him or her so much that she is striving to keep both of you as healthy as possible. You are going to be a great mom! No guilt allowed here – you are doing your best! You cannot wait to meet your new bundle of joy, but you might be feeling anxious about what to expect when your water breaks or your OB/GYN announces “it’s time.” We want to share some tips to help you better prepare for your labor and delivery, as well as offer some advice for taking care of you and your new baby upon arriving home. Manage stress Don’t let the stresses of managing your Type 1 take away from the joys of your pregnancy. Relish in those baby kicks, proudly share your ultrasound photos far and wide, schedule that maternity photo shoot and take time to enjoy life’s little luxuries before your baby arrives. Create your birth plan Discuss your birth plan with your OB/GYN and endocrinologist. Ask how your medical team will approach your diabetes management during your time in the hospital. Make your personal desires known and be your own advocate. Your team will help you develop a plan for how to handle your changing insulin needs on the day of delivery and the days after. Most women will need to reduce t Continue reading >>

Eva's Birth Story: Part 1 | Mom Makes Joy

Eva's Birth Story: Part 1 | Mom Makes Joy

Well we did it! Its taken almost 7 weeks for me to find the energy to get online and share with you our news (#sleepdeprivation), but here we are! Eva Melissa was born on January 15, 2016 at 4:36pm weighing 7 pounds 6 ounces and measuring 20 inches long. This is our birth story. If youve been following my blog, you know the beginning of this story actually started almost two years ago, when I committed to getting my blood sugar to a baby-ready level and overcame my deep fear of everything a diabetic pregnancy can entail. You can read about that journey here and here . New Readers Please Note: I have Type 1 Diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease caused when the body attacks and destroys the insulin producing cells in the pancreas; it cannot be prevented or reversed. This type of diabetes is different from the kinds of diabetes you hear about more often: Type 2 Diabetes (which is usuallybut not alwayscaused by diet/lifestyle/age) and Gestational Diabetes (a short-term condition that only occurs during the tail-end of pregnancy). That said, my experience with pregnancy will probably be a bit different from someone who has Type 2 or Gestational Diabetes. Please keep this in mind if you are reading to learn a bit more about pregnancy with these other types of diabetes. To get a brief 411 on what Type 1 Diabetes really is, you can check out this FAQ post here! I was lucky to have a pretty easy pregnancy as far as pregnancy itself goes. With the exception of a little morning sickness, a cold and a bout of the stomach flu at 27 weeks, I didnt really have any of the other pregnancy aches and pains. What I did have, however, was a second full-time job: managing my blood sugar. Every day I watched everything I ate, counted every gram of carbohydrate and made a study of my blood Continue reading >>

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Forty five years ago when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes I was clearly told I couldn’t have children. I didn’t. Today, thankfully that advice is no longer given. And while a woman with Type 1 diabetes needs to take precautions, she can absolutely, and safely, have a healthy baby. I sat down for an interview with Ginger Vieira, co-author,with Jennifer Smith, of the recent book, Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes: Your Month-to-Month Guide to Blood Sugar Management. What will people find in the book? As much information as you possibly need to understand why your blood sugars fluctuate during pregnancy and how to adjust your insulin management to keep your blood sugars as close to non-diabetic levels as possible. Also the book covers preparing for pregnancy, months one through nine of your pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum, including the challenges of breastfeeding for a woman with type 1 diabetes. My co-author Jenny is also my diabetes pregnancy coach. As a certified diabetes educator, woman with type 1 diabetes and mother, she knows this journey inside and out. What makes pregnancy for a woman with type 1 diabetes challenging? Let’s face it, a normal day with type 1 diabetes is challenging, balancing an autonomic system your body ought to balance on its own. And we’re only given insulin to do the job, while a non-diabetic body uses several different hormones to balance blood sugar. Add pregnancy to that mix and you add the insane pressure of, “Every decision you make impacts the human life growing inside of you!!!” And now you have to balance your blood sugars with constantly shifting pregnancy hormones. Plus those hormones impact your insulin needs in ways that are constantly changing and evolving. Also, there is never a break. Even when you’re sleepi Continue reading >>

Birthing Options | Diabetes Health

Birthing Options | Diabetes Health

Throughout pregnancy and all the way up until labor, I was adamant that I was not having a cesarean section. I was terrified of being cut open because I know that my healing time is longer due to my lowered immune system. In 2009, I had to go to the emergency room for an infection caused by cutting my leg while shaving, so how could I possibly heal after being opened up to birth a baby? I had also read some articles on not-so-credible websites about studies showing that C-section babies are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes than vaginally delivered babies. I tried not to give these stories credence because they didnt come from resources that I trusted, but they were still enough to scare me. Because I didnt want my baby to be induced, I took long walks during the last weeks of pregnancy to try to get labor started on its own. I experienced phantom labor, or Braxton Hicks contractions, as early as week 30, and I felt that those contractions were a sure sign that my baby was ready to come on her own. I wanted a natural birth without pain medications, in part because I was afraid that taking numbing drugs would make it impossible to feel my glucose levels rise and fall. I understood that going through childbirth without pain medications was going to be difficult, especially because my little girl weighed nearly 10 pounds and I was a first-time mom. However, I was willing to do it if it would be better for my baby. To prepare myself for what was to come, I talked to other women in pregnancy networks who had gone through natural, medication-free births. I took a childbirth class with my husband to learn what labor would be like and to hear about methods that might work for us during labor. It was calming to breathe in and out slowly while sitting between my husbands le Continue reading >>

Birth Story - Diabetes

Birth Story - Diabetes

I hope you enjoy these fantastic birth stories from Amy. Having a more "natural" birth can be a challenge for a diabetic mom. Amy is a stay-at-home mom and a doula herself. She got the benefits of "modern medicine" as well as utilizing a doula. We conceived Ian on the third month of trying. We were very excited and my diabetes was in control--or so I thought. We had to move when I was nine weeks pregnant. I had to switch all my doctors. I found a doctor through my insurance. Our first appointment at one week was a disaster. I met the doctor and told him I was a doula and would be looking for a doula for my birth. He proceeded to tell me how horrible doulas and midwives were and how they caused all sorts of deaths! He also told me how much I would love how "high-tech" he was and that he'd induce me at 37 or 38 weeks. I was floored. Needless to say we left and never returned. We took another shot at a doctor our insurance covered and were lucky to find a good one. She referred me to an endocrinologist. I was stunned by how thorough he was. I had never been so closely monitored before. I saw him weekly and changed to sliding insulin scales, multiple shots a day, and carb counting. My diabetes was now more in control than I had ever been. My pregnancy progressed normally. My doctor was fine with me going to full term, but we never made it that far. At 36 weeks my water broke at 3:30 am on Feb. 5, 2002. I called the hospital and they said to come to the hospital. We next called my doula, who suggested waiting at home until she got there, which would take a little over an hour. I'm so glad we stayed at home. I went downstairs and washed the dishes since I really didn't want any dirty dishes when I came home with a new baby. We finished packing our bags and by then our doula Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Child Birth - A Few Questions

Type 1 And Child Birth - A Few Questions

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Pregnancy ' started by jessie , Aug 5, 2011 . Just started my 'parenting classes' and whilst informative, I am wondering if my labour will be very different from the other Mums there, for example... Will I be on a sliding scale of insulin, if so what exactly is this and does it mean being hooked up or will I be able to move about? How is blood sugar monitored during labour? What about food? Will I have to take glucose? Apart from the possibility of baby growing too large, what are the reasons that having diabetes means you may have to be induced and probably shouldn't go over your due date? I'm sure I read something somewhere about placenta problems being more likely... i've been told off my diabetic midwife that i'll probably have a c/s due to my pelvis being to small and diabetics have a slightly bigger babies.. whenever i ask these questions to my diabetic midwife, she doesnt give me a stright answer. Which is frustrating! Confusing isn't it, my midwife just keeps telling me to go scan by scan as they'll obviously be keeping an eye on the growth. I guess they don't really know how it will work out until nearer the time. Are you doing OK with your sugar levels? Well, I am not pregnant, but remember how you feel only too well! I was told exactly the same thing...scan by scan etc. I did ask,"if I can have a natural birth, will it be like non diabetics?" They told me that no, for me I would be on a constant fetal monitor, and therefore could not move off the bed. I had an emergency c section with my first...and after been told that I would not be able to walk around (like I wanted to) but would be under close supervision, possibly witha Continue reading >>

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