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Type 1 Diabetes Marriage Life

The Effects Of Diabetes On Relationships

The Effects Of Diabetes On Relationships

Will you leave your SO (significant other) because of diabetes? Committed relationships are hard enough. When you add a chronic illness into the mix of everyday problems, it can place undue stress on a relationship. Do you leave your spouse or partner with diabetes when the going gets tough, or do you stick it out and work together to solve problems that come up, “in sickness and in health?” These are questions you may be asking yourself if you have been going through a tough time in your relationship or marriage due to diabetes. If your partner is in a state of denial and they are refusing to participate in self-care activities or listen to their doctor, this can be quite frustrating. You may be getting burnt out from always trying to fix the right amount of carbohydrates, only to catch your other half in the back room hiding with a box of candy. Feeling like you are the “diabetes police” and always nagging drains the joy out of your relationship. The spouse of a diabetic can feel a loss of control over the future, and be afraid that they will lose their life partner. Conversely, if you are the diabetic in the match, you tend to get quite aggravated with all of the nagging and “sugar-shaming” that can be going on. Maybe your partner didn’t support you by attending diabetes education classes, and now she doesn’t seem to know that it’s ok for you to have an occasional treat. Maybe she doesn’t realize that you are having the extra carbohydrates, but you have a walk planned for after the meal. Sometimes you feel misunderstood. It’s true that diabetes can take a physical, mental and financial toll on a relationship. Remember that your overbearing and controlling partner is acting from a place of genuine caring and concern for you. Now let’s look at t Continue reading >>

Diabetessisters

Diabetessisters

My experience having a wife with type 1 diabetes is not so different from any other marriage, with the exception of having a complicated, treacherous side kick along for the ride. My wife, Anna, was upfront with me regarding hertype 1 diabetesfrom early on in our relationship. I realized right away what a burden it is to tell a boyfriend that you have a serious, lifealtering issue, knowing full well that it might scare off a lot of guys. A silver lining could be that it might help point out the wrong kind of man to date. I was worried that Anna wouldn't like my receding hairline, she was worried I wouldn't like her life sustaining insulin pump, not quite the same level of seriousness. Anna's aunt vetted me by asking her "did you tell that boy about your machine"? Maybe something is lost in the Spanish-English translation, but it asks much more than it seems. Can he handle it? Is he the right kind of guy to date? A few years after we met, we decided to get married and had a long conversation about starting a family. Anna was determined to be a mother and together, we forged ahead. A major source of worry and of reward for my wife and I, as a couple, was the choice we made to have a child. Anna worked long and hard at preparing to get pregnant, knowing full well that she needed to have her A1c below a target numberwhich she had arrived at with her endocrinologist. For months Anna had a part time job as her own A1C mechanic, doing her best to ensure that when the test was taken, her numbers would be the very best they could be. The process itself is a sobering one, as it presents an awareness of how type 1 has a strange hold on the life of one's wife as well as the health of your unborn child. Usually the only concerns about when to try and get pregnant are related to mon Continue reading >>

Marriage And Type 1 Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Marriage And Type 1 Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Howdy channji! WELCOME to DiabeticConnect! I see no reason a T1, or any other type of Person With Diabetes (PWD) should not marry. Do you have a choice of a PWD and a nonPWD as a marriage partner? That's great for you, you smoothie! This is just MY preference for ME . . . . I have many "medical challenges" and I have found that people who have other medical challenges are generally more accepting of my medical challenges in return. In 2009 I married my bride "Jem" who had many many serious medical challenges. Sharing some of the same challenges, I believe strengthened our relationship greatly. Unfortunately she had so many potentially deadly challenges, that in July 2010 one or more of them "took" her from me. She went to sleep one night and I couldn't wake her in the morning. She had already become cold overnight. that was hard to discover her like that, but I am glad she went peacefully in her own bed with all her things around her, not in some noisy hospital! She was a special lady and my life was enriched by knowing her and being with her. (her friends and family said she said the same of me.) Now I am talking with a lady who has cerebal palsy, thinking of getting together with her, eventually. Right now she is 1800+ mi away from me here in Las Vegas. She is talking about coming to LV this coming April. But back to your question: ")What is good * to marry a type 1 diabetic person or * to marry a non- diabetic person."[?] If you have maintained your health, and have no major complications, there are no reasons I see to avoid either type of person (or even a t2 either). I'm a type 1 diabeteic and have been for 34 years (I'm 49). I was married, divorced and now married again. I don't see any problem with getting married simply because you're a diabetic. I will say I t Continue reading >>

When You Love A Woman With Type 1 Diabetes

When You Love A Woman With Type 1 Diabetes

I know a lot of women with Type 1 diabetes. Some are friends, colleagues, peers and some are women, young and old, whose paths have crossed with mine at different times for different reasons. And even though each and every one of us are different in the way we view, experience and react to our Type 1 diabetes, I typically find that, when we first discover we are both meandering the snaking female Type 1 diabetes footpath, there is a collective knowing, a camaraderie that instantly bonds our lives in an inquisitive way. Often, we will immediately begin to chat like old friends and many times, we will openly begin to share intimate details with each other. We talk about the effect of our diabetes on our careers, our health, our loved ones, spouses, families and friends. For me, it’s emotionally comforting to connect with someone who really and truly gets what I’m going through. Trust me when I say that the emotional side of diabetes is a huge piece of the puzzle and if it is not taken into consideration, it can unravel all well laid diabetes plans. So if you love a woman with Type 1, maybe this blog will give you a little something to consider. Or maybe you already know everything. That being said.... Women With Type 1 Diabetes and Sexual Intimacy Ever try to enjoy sex while worried about your blood sugar dropping or soaring? How about having your medical devices front and center on your body? And because of the cost, and inconvenience I might add, of a device being knocked off, I always have to consider where my devices are on my body to help avoid that scenario. And even after marriage to a man who says he doesn’t care about my devices, the thought that I will look “medicinal” to him creates vulnerability in me that I don’t like. And heaven forbid that he ac Continue reading >>

7 Stories On Love, Sex, And Type 1 Diabetes

7 Stories On Love, Sex, And Type 1 Diabetes

We’ve assembled our favorite romance-themed stories over the years. People with Type 1 diabetes can have unique love lives. Blood sugar management provides an early opportunity to test how supportive potential partners can be. And if a relationship survives that stress test, it’s up to the person with diabetes and his/her partner to learn how to communicate through all the daily highs and lows. For everyone affected by Type 1 diabetes who has a romantic streak, we’ve assembled our favorite stories on love, sex, dating, and blood sugar management: A Love Letter During a Blood Sugar Swing A man describes the difficulties of communicating with his love during highs and lows. 7 Tips to a Better Type 1 Sex Life Ideas for how to keep your blood sugar numbers level when horizontal. 3 Diabetes Dating Sites – A Review We’ve braved these sites so you don’t necessarily have to. Let’s Talk About Sexual Dysfunction and Type 1 Sexual dysfunction from diabetes often can be reversed if caught in time. 3 Tips for Navigating T1D in Marriage A diabetes psychologist shares his secrets. What it’s Like to Date Someone Else with Type 1 Weighing the pros and cons of having a partner who also lacks a working pancreas. Discovering Love and T1D at a Ballgame When the first bloom of love and the first bloom of diabetes coincide. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type2Nation. Continue reading >>

Diabetes From A Spouse Perspective: Married To A Type 1

Diabetes From A Spouse Perspective: Married To A Type 1

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. It's been a while, but we're back with our ongoing series by andfor loved ones of people with diabetes (PWDs), the so-called Diabetic Partner Follies . Today we'reproud to share a post written by Sandy Floyd, who lives with her type 1 husbandVince in the Philadelphia area and blogs over at A Diabetic Spouse . Vince was diagnosed at the tender young ageof six months (!) and the complications he lives with bring a unique perspective. We know it isn't easy being the loved one of a PWD, but Sandy saysthe challenges they've faced have made them stronger. Read on... When it comes to sharingmy story as the wife of diabetic husband, this story may be a little differentthan many of the others out there in the community. Sure, I'm like other type 1 spouses in many ways. But my worldis much different than that of my fellow D-Wives: See, I'm also a caregiver. My husband, Vince, was diagnosed 32 years ago with type 1diabetes, and we've been together for 10 years and married for four years. His complications set in by his mid-20s, long before we weremarried. Vince developed retinopathy, neuropathy, and hypoglycemia unawareness quite the trifecta for any person with diabetes! He relies on the Medtronic Revel insulin pump with theContinuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) to deliver insulin and alert him of potentiallife threatening high and low blood sugars. But the complications have madethings more difficult. The retinopathy has caused significant vision loss in one eye,and Vince has had many laser treatments done on both eyes along with vitrectomy surgery onone of them. Although his vision is extremely limited in one eye, the lasersurgeries Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetics Need Pre-marriage Counselling

Type 1 Diabetics Need Pre-marriage Counselling

Type 1 diabetics need pre-marriage counselling Counselling and guidance are necessary to provide youth with Type 1 Diabetes with the confidence that a good marital life is indeed possible for them, according to a study conducted at the M.V.Hospital for Diabetes and Prof. M.Viswanathan Diabetes Research Centre, Royapuram. The study showed that all the female participants with Type 1 Diabetes and 82 per cent of male participants were worried about getting married. About 86 per cent of women and 56 per cent of men in the study group felt they will not be able to fulfil their partner's expectations. When it came to enjoying a good sex life, 90 per cent of the males and 56 per cent of female participants had the perception that they would not be able to perform. All the female participants and 72 per cent of males felt they could not have healthy children, and that their offspring would also be diabetic. Type 1 Diabetes is the most challenging disorder for children. They are mostly diagnosed between 5 and 15 years, and in rare instances, even in the first year after birth, Vijay Viswanathan, MD, MV Hosptial for Diabetes, explains. They have to be off sweets and on insulin shots right through. The condition can be very traumatic, not only for the child, but also for the family. The study was executed through a questionnaire that sought to test the emotional well-being, concepts of marriage and conception among the participants. Most participants had lived with diabetes for a minimum of 10 years, and were of marriageable age. In many instances, their self-esteem was really low. This reflects on their impressions of marriage and procreation as well, Dr. Viswanathan adds. While men with Type 1 Diabetes believe that they are sure to have erectile dysfunction, women are afraid th Continue reading >>

Personal And Relationship Challenges Of Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Personal And Relationship Challenges Of Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Little is known about the psychosocial challenges of adults living with type 1 diabetes or its impact on partner relationships. This qualitative study was undertaken to gain better understanding of these issues. Four focus groups were held, two with adult type 1 diabetic patients (n = 16) and two with partners (n = 14). Two broad questions were posed: “What are the emotional and interpersonal challenges you have experienced because you have (your partner has) type 1 diabetes?” and “How does the fact that you have (your partner has) type 1 diabetes affect your relationship with your partner, positively and/or negatively?” Sessions were recorded and transcribed, and analyzed by a team of four researchers, using constant comparative methods to identify core domains and concepts. Four main domains were identified: 1) impact of diabetes on the relationship, including level of partner involvement, emotional impact of diabetes on the relationship, and concerns about child-rearing; 2) understanding the impact of hypoglycemia; 3) stress of potential complications; and 4) benefits of technology. Themes suggest that, although partner involvement varies (very little to significant), there exists significant anxiety about hypoglycemia and future complications and sources of conflict that may increase relationship stress. Partner support is highly valued, and technology has a positive influence. Adults with type 1 diabetes face unique emotional and interpersonal challenges. Future research should focus on gaining a better understanding of how they cope and the effect of psychosocial stressors and coping on adherence, quality of life, and glycemic control. Continue reading >>

My Journey With A Type 1 Diabetic

My Journey With A Type 1 Diabetic

My Journey With a Type 1 Diabetic Written by: Mitchell Jacobs I remember the first time I met Brittany, it was like yesterday. She was this cute, bubbly, giggly girl. But mostly what I remember is how beautiful I thought she was. We began dating when I was only 19, I was fresh out of high school without a clue of what the world was or even what diabetes was. All I knew was my pickup truck, my dog Petey and this girl I couldn’t stop thinking about. Then one day I was with her and she introduced me to this disease I had never been familiar with. Known as Type 1 Diabetes. We were out to lunch like any couple would be and Brittany began to explain to me the details of her disease. I didn’t know anything, and at the time it didn’t really phase me much either. As months passed we moved in together. This is when I really started to see how ugly of a disease Type 1 Diabetes really is. Her family had recently dropped her from the insurance and Brittany and I began to feel the repercussions of it, barely being able to afford food, let alone insulin. I began to see Brittany’s blood sugars crashing to lows so severe that she would become unconscious. I was having to wrestle with my girlfriend going from normal to extremely combative to unconscious, and having to call 911, all within an hour. I was flabbergasted by this disease. “What in the HELL was going on!” Why is her blood sugar so wacky and why can’t we figure this out?” I remember becoming so involved in trying to figure this disease out and be as supportive as I possibly could. One day she had an appointment at the endocrinologist’s office, and I stayed up the whole night thinking about questions to ask this Doctor, so I could write them down in a notebook. I needed to know how to fix this disease. “it’ Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Puts Strain On Marriage

Type 1 Diabetes Puts Strain On Marriage

The study, published in Diabetes Care, was done in four focus group sessions, two with 16 adults with type 1 diabetes and two with 14 of their spouses. The intent was to gather preliminary information to guide future research in an under-studied field, says researcher Paula M. Trief, PhD, professor of medicine at the State University of New York Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. "There is literature on the importance of relationships for patients with type 2 diabetes, but very little research on psychological and psychosocial issues of adult type 1 patients at all. They get a lot of attention when they’re kids, then it just drops off completely," she says. The findings of the study suggest that a patient’s personal relationships can affect their diabetes and that doctors should ask patients how things are going at home. In some cases, having the patient bring the partner to an office visit could allow the doctor to explain concepts to the partner as well, Trief says. In the focus groups, both patients and partners were asked two broad questions, followed by free-flowing discussion: “What are the emotional and interpersonal challenges you have experienced because you have (your partner has) type 1 diabetes?” “How does the fact that you have (your partner has) type 1 diabetes affect your relationship with your partner, positively and/or negatively?” Partner involvement ranged from very involved and supportive to “help when asked,” in which the partner is helpful when called upon but otherwise not involved. Emotionally, most patients expressed positive feelings toward the level of support they received from their spouse and a sense that the condition had brought them closer together. However, a smaller group mentioned a negative impact from the diabet Continue reading >>

How To Make A Diabetic Spouse Happy

How To Make A Diabetic Spouse Happy

Not many can say that they are married to a part-robot, part-warrior that skillfully keeps herself alive due to the absence of a functioning organ (the pancreas), that is both vital & necessary for one to live. This is my wife, a Type 1 diabetic, who is just days away from celebrating her 4 year mark as a T1D. Back in 2012, right around the time we started dating, Marci she said wasnt feeling well and couldnt get out of bed, which was very unusual. Over the next few months, her conditions progressively worsened. What should have been a blissful first few months living in Malibu, quickly turned into months of suffering and unbeknownst to us, Marci was moving through life with a chronic illness that was debilitating her each day that she was going undetected. After seeing consistent days of seeing her lying in bed lifeless and unable to move, I told her it was time to go to the hospital, just days before Christmas. Her numbers were above the meters ability to read which they think was 800+. She was soon diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes on December 21, 2012. I had ZERO idea about diabetes but I did know that because of the fact I loved her so much, I was going to do all that I could to learn about Type 1 diabetes. All I wanted was to see her get back to her normal, fun-loving, energetic, active, smile-about-everything self. I quickly studied all the books that I could and spent endless hours of research. After learning about diabetes and what diabetics could do to get back to their normal active lifestyle, it quickly dawned on me. This is something that all spouses of diabetics need to hear: Its NOT about what can I do to help her, Its about how can I change MY life to help us. It is our combination of diet, exercise and lifestyle that has led to a very smooth transition in Continue reading >>

When You Love A Woman With Type 1 Diabetes

When You Love A Woman With Type 1 Diabetes

I know a lot of women with Type 1 diabetes. Some are friends, colleagues, peers and some are women, young and old, whose paths have crossed with mine at different times for different reasons. And even though each and every one of us are different in the way we view, experience and react to our Type 1 diabetes, I typically find that, when we first discover we are both meandering the snaking female Type 1 diabetes footpath, there is a collective knowing, a camaraderie that instantly bonds our lives in an inquisitive way. Often, we will immediately begin to chat like old friends and many times, we will openly begin to share intimate details with each other. We talk about the effect of our diabetes on our careers, our health, our loved ones, spouses, families and friends. For me, it’s emotionally comforting to connect with someone who really and truly gets what I’m going through. Trust me when I say that the emotional side of diabetes is a huge piece of the puzzle and if it is not taken into consideration, it can unravel all well laid diabetes plans. So if you love a woman with Type 1diabetes, maybe this blog will give you a little something to consider. Or maybe you already know everything. That being said…. Women With Type 1 Diabetes and Sexual Intimacy Ever try to enjoy sex with Type 1 diabetes while worrying about your blood sugar dropping or soaring? How about having your medical devices front and center on your body? And because of the cost, and inconvenience I might add, of a device being knocked off, I always have to consider where my devices are on my body to help avoid that scenario. And even after marriage to a man who says he doesn’t care about my devices, the thought that I will look “medicinal” to him creates vulnerability in me that I don’t like Continue reading >>

5 Tips For A Happier Marriage With Diabetes

5 Tips For A Happier Marriage With Diabetes

5 Tips for a Happier Marriage With Diabetes After you bolus for your wedding cake, heres what you need to know It has been said that the first year of marriage is often the hardest. Learning to live as a pair and work as a team when diabetes is in the picture often requires some adjustments, even for the longest-term couples. Here are some expert tips: After planning a wedding and celebrating the big day, then coming back down to Earth, you may find that you have neglected parts of your relationship. Starting off as a married couple means investing in togethernesseven when it comes to tackling diabetes. We know from research looking at mismatched couples, where one has a disease and one doesnt, if both have a mind frame that were in it together, they have better outcomes [and] marriage satisfaction, says Tai Mendenhall, PhD, LMFT, who specializes in medical family therapy at the University of Minnesota. When one partner is removed from the others disease management, it can get in the way of a team approach and healthy relationship. Your partner should not be left in the dark about your diabetes management. Anne Safran Dalin, 63, of Hillsborough, New Jersey, has been married to her husband, Jim, for 41 years. She was diagnosed with prediabetes in 2005 and now manages her type2 diabetes by following a healthy diet. Its up to the [person with diabetes] to educate their partner in the care of their health, Dalin says, noting that Jim commits to eating healthy meals with her. If a partner is willing to attend an educational program or [a] session with a diabetes counselor, that would be a huge step forward for the couple. Sarah Mart, 45, of Fort Collins, Colorado, has been living with type1 diabetes since she was 7 years old. Her wife, Anne Kirven, doesnt have diabetes, so Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Married Life

Type 1 And Married Life

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am Type 1 for a very very long time and married too. Has anybody in this group been a Type 1 diabetic for more than 30 years and married. How do you handle hypos when your married and your husband sees his wife having hypos in sleep and day time. I need a Councillor who can advise how I can cope up with the life. Will be happy if any one can give me a supportive hand. Hi @SHmano - sadly hypos go hand in hand with married life, obviously having a sympathetic partner who understands that this is part of the condition and knows how to respond is important. What aspect is your husband or yourself struggling with ? Am not a counsellor but we have married type 1s who can respond and support from experience. Im married with Type 1. Im with @Juicyj ... what type of advice are you looking for and Ill do my best to help? Hi @SHmano - sadly hypos go hand in hand with married life, obviously having a sympathetic partner who understands that this is part of the condition and knows how to respond is important. What aspect is your husband or yourself struggling with ? Am not a counsellor but we have married type 1s who can respond and support from experience. Thanks, My husband never understands what happens when there is hypo. He is not supportive of it though I earn my living for myself and not dependent on my husband monetarily. When I get hypos in the sleep at 2 a.m in the morning i act weirdly, a times I shout, have convulsions. This has affected me mentally. I do not know how to balance my husbands reactions and my mental state after I get a hypo. 1. How to avoid a misunderstanding that I do not have anything other than diabetic hypos Hi @SHmano It sounds li Continue reading >>

Marrying Into Diabetes: A Husband’s Perspective

Marrying Into Diabetes: A Husband’s Perspective

I am married to a beautiful woman with type 1 diabetes. On many days, diabetes has churned the waters in our relationship. I’ve argued with low blood sugars and lost. What woman can be responsible for being snippy when her blood sugar’s at 35 mg/dl (2 mmol/L)? I’ve watched date night get canceled by an all day high. My empathy for Elizabeth is spiked with a little anger. But how can I talk about my frustration at diabetes when it’s a trifle next to the boulder that Elizabeth carries? These feelings sit inside me. They fester. I try to be strong. On difficult days, frustration boils over. Other times I don’t know what to say. I lie there in bed while she has low blood sugar and struggles. I see how much it’s hurting her, how hard it is for her, how bad she feels. I want her to know that I see it, and it tears me up, and I wish there was a way I could share that burden. But instead I say I’m sorry. The last thing she wants is pity. I’ve learned a lot about diabetes helping develop Diabetes Daily over the last six years. Yet when it comes to my own relationship with the most important person in my life, I still get it wrong too often. The challenges faced by those who care about someone with diabetes are rarely discussed. It ends up hurting both the person with diabetes and the person without it. So this year, let’s start a dialogue about ways that people with diabetes and their loved ones can support each other better. I invite any loved ones who would like to talk about their experiences to get in touch or to write about it on your own site and share a link. I also encourage couples to attend the 2012 National DiabetesSisters Conference in Raleigh, NC this May. There will be a session specifically for those without diabetes to talk about issues like thi Continue reading >>

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