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Type 1 Diabetes Lunch Ideas

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Recipes

Recipes

These recipes have been adapted from safefood with information tailored to those with Diabetes. Check out the food and diabetes section on the website for more information and background to healthy eating for diabetes. You will find that some of these recipes include sugar and that the traffic light system indicates red, as the recipe may be high in sugars but this does not mean that they can’t be included as part of a balanced diet. We are trying to increase awareness that having diabetes does not mean you must follow a diet that restricts sugar, as this is not the case. Small amounts of sugar are fine, particularly if they are combined with foods that are high in fibre. Desserts, biscuits and confectionery are not forbidden but because these are also usually high in calories, fat and sugar, people with diabetes should only have these occasionally. Continue reading >>

What To Feed Primary School Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

What To Feed Primary School Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

Primary school is an exciting time for children as they enter a new school, make new friends and begin to partake in social events such as parties, sleepovers and school camps. During this time children become increasingly independent and aware of the social and practical aspects of their diabetes management. While parents are still actively involved in diabetes care, children of this age are usually starting to learn how to take blood glucose readings, give some of their own injections and take responsibility for their food choices. It is usually during this period when children start to recognise that their day ¬to ¬day routine of diabetes care, which they must also carry out at school, makes them “different” from the other children. Playground peer pressure can have a large impact on a child’s eating patterns and children of this age will commonly swap lunches, buy food from the canteen and feel the urge to fit in via eating the same food as everyone else. Social pressure can also impact on a child’s confidence and mood, which can make them less likely to adhere to the diabetes care plan. Changes in blood glucose levels may further impact on a child’s mood making them more irritable, tired and/or restless. As a parent it can be challenging to balance your child’s desires for normality with the restrictions and treatment requirements imposed by diabetes. As children of this age often lack an in ¬depth of understanding of the impact of diabetes on their future wellbeing, the priorities of the child and the parent are usually not consistent. Parents often feel frustrated in regards to their inability to achieve glycaemic control and feel concerned about the possibility of long¬ term complications and hypoglycemia at school. On the other hand children ten Continue reading >>

How One Mom Packs Lunches For Her Diabetic Son

How One Mom Packs Lunches For Her Diabetic Son

Coming up with a variety of healthy foods for school lunches is challenging enough, but if you have a child who is diabetic, the thought of calculating starches/carbohydrates can be overwhelming. Here, Brooke Wheeler shares three tips that have made lunch packing for her diabetic son a bit easier. My now 5½-year-old son was diagnosed with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes at 21 months of age. Since his diagnosis, we have encountered many obstacles along the way as we navigate through life with diabetes. One of the biggest hurdles to-date, for me, came in the months before we were preparing to send him to kindergarten. Because I am a stay-at-home mom, this was the first time his diabetes management would be entrusted to someone else (the school nurse). I was particularly concerned with how lunchtime would be for him. Now we are halfway through the school year, and I am so happy to say that my worry was for nothing. I’m not saying every day has been perfect, but we have found a pretty good system that is working for us and that is giving our son a “normal” school experience. Lunch packing for a diabetic isn’t as different from lunch packing for someone without diabetes as you might think. As is the case for any other kid, the most important thing is to have a balanced diet. The difference is that with a diabetic, you must be aware of the carbohydrate content because that determines the insulin dosage for each meal. Fortunately, our son is on an insulin pump, so once you enter the amount of carbohydrates he’ll be eating, it makes all of the calculations for you. I try to keep my son’s lunches in the 40- to 50-gram carbohydrate range. I have found that this amount helps keep his blood sugar stabilized, while still being able to provide him with a food portion that kee Continue reading >>

Lunch Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Lunch Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a progressive disease with many potential complications. These include blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, and loss of toes, feet, or legs. Roughly 1 in every 11 people in the United States currently has diabetes, but although the condition may be familiar, it is hardly harmless. It is the country's seventh leading cause of death, and people with diabetes have a 50 percent higher risk of death than those without the condition. Fortunately, even though diabetes is a chronic disease, it can be managed. One way that complications can be prevented is by following dietary guidelines. Classic lunch ingredients that are good for people with diabetes With planning and conscious eating, people with diabetes can safely enjoy a satisfying and varied diet. The following common lunch items can also be part of a healthful lunch for people with diabetes: canned tuna or salmon hard-boiled eggs salads with dressing on the side low-salt soups and chili whole fruit, such as apples and berries cottage cheese plain, unsweetened Greek yogurt peanut or almond butter Lunch ideas People who need to control their blood sugar can still select from a wide variety of options when they are looking for a tasty lunch. The following lunch ideas provide about 3 servings of carbohydrates each, or about 45 grams (g), or less: soup and salad, such as tomato soup with a kale-apple salad whole-wheat wrap (tortilla = 30 g carbs or less), such as turkey with hummus, cucumber, tomatoes, feta cheese, and olives spinach salad with canned tuna, ½ mayonnaise, ½ Greek yogurt, celery, and lemon juice, served over greens and diced apple hard-boiled egg served with five whole-wheat crackers, string cheese, a piece of fruit, and veggie sticks with peanut butter smoothie made with 1 cup frozen Continue reading >>

Can Lunch Packing On A Diabetic Diet Be Fun?

Can Lunch Packing On A Diabetic Diet Be Fun?

Laura Folos, who blogs at My 3 Ring Circus, is a busy young mom who was recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Portion control and specific diabetic diet plans aren’t what most would describe as ‘fun’, but when Laura told me what a difference my EasyLunchbox System was making in her life now that her eating had to be regimented and restrictive, I asked if she would share her story. I thought it could be encouraging to those who have medical conditions or allergies that require them to carefully plan and pack meals ahead. So, dear Lunchers, here’s Laura’s story in her own words: All of my life, I’ve battled with healthy eating and what tastes good…as well as how to make it fun to eat. So, when I was diagnosed with what appeared to be type 2 diabetes (I have recently been told I’ve got type 1.5 – originally presents as type 2, but has shades of type 1 in there – so, hence, the 1.5…) three days after my 33rd birthday, I was not only crushed, but I was given a list of everything I’d have to lose in my food library. I was told to drop my carb intake significantly and count every. single. thing. that went into my mouth. I went on the usual purging of all carb-y stuff in my house and tried to cold turkey bagels. Yeah. That went well. You try and tell a girl from NY that she can’t have a bagel. It just doesn’t happen. But then, I resigned myself to being a bit more sensible. I started baggie-ing my lunches. Some carrots in this baggie, some popcorn in that one, some protein in this one, and usually a drink to go with it. It became annoying, and I think I made more visits to the dollar store to stock up on baggies than I care to admit. Since this got so everloving annoying, I quickly tired of the entire regime, and stopped. It wasn’t a cold turkey Continue reading >>

Tasty Brown-bag Lunches For Kids With Diabetes

Tasty Brown-bag Lunches For Kids With Diabetes

Tasty Brown-Bag Lunches For Kids With Diabetes Some suggestions for healthy, tasty, and carb-counted lunches! Our school lunch blog generated some thoughtful comments and questions, one of which we are addressing today. If your child has diabetes and attends public school what can you give him or her for lunch thats nutritious, carb smart and wont end up in the garbage or traded for something more tempting? Depending on the effort you want to put in and the time you have to make lunches, there is actually a wide variety of choices you can offer your hungry child. And with todays cold packs there is very little you cant transport to school safely. Heres a school-weeks worth of suggestions (plus two bonus menus). Peanut butter and diet jelly on whole wheat bread (for those institutions that allow peanut butter) Chicken salad made with celery, almonds and red grapes in half a whole wheat pita Vegetable Beef kabobs chunks of sirloin beef interspersed with onions, grape tomatoes and green peppers in a lavash wrap Celery sticks and julienne red and orange peppers Turkey Breast or Roast Beef on rye with mustard Small side salad of lettuce, tomato, carrots and peppers Flavored hummus with whole grain crackers and baby carrots Left over cold vegetable pizza on whole wheat crust Most students with type 1 diabetes have to go to the nurses office to have their insulin given. It is helpful for the nurse to know the carb count of lunch if the child is using an insulin-to-carb ratio. The lunches above are easy to count and the carb count can be increased or decreased by adjusting the portion of milk or desserts. (And remember to check the carb count of the foods you use to make each meal. The counts in this blog are estimations based on typical carbs in each food.) And suppose you do Continue reading >>

8 Awesome Diabetes Friendly Lunches That Are Easy For Work

8 Awesome Diabetes Friendly Lunches That Are Easy For Work

Brown bagging it to work, even if you’re not using a brown paper bag, is the best way to control your carb intake at lunch time. Not to mention, it’s much easier on your wallet than eating out every day. Gone are the days of boring old peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with a bag of chips and a red apple. Get creative and enjoy your lunches from home again. Here are some healthy lunch ideas, along with the carbohydrate counts. These lunches include 60 grams of carb each, but are broken down for you to see where that carb is coming from, in case you want to adjust for your personal needs. 1. Smoked Turkey & Harvarti Pita – Creamy Havarti paired with smoked turkey is divine. Thin slices of Granny smith apples inside are the icing on the cake. You can even enjoy a few vanilla wafers with this lunch and still meet an acceptable carb count. Food Amount Carbs (grams) Pita 1 30 Apple 1 15 Vanilla Wafers 5 15 Total 60 2. Fancy Grilled Cheese – Use whole grain bread and add chopped marinated olives or mushrooms, or roasted red peppers, or roasted green chilies to the traditional grilled cheese sandwich. Nothing goes better with grilled cheese than tomato soup. You can also include 1 cup of melon and still make the target. Food Amount Carbs (grams) Bread 2 slices 30 Melon 1 cup 15 Tomato Soup 1 cup 15 Total 60 3. Mason Jar Salad – These are all the rage right now. Simple to prepare ahead of time. They keep well up to a week in the fridge. Layer ingredients in this order: salad dressing, protein (tuna or chickpeas or black beans), veggies (grape tomatoes or chopped bell peppers or cucumber slices), and salad greens. Carb counts will vary based on what you include, but you should have plenty of carbs leftover to add a Greek yogurt parfait with 1 cup of plain yogurt and 1 Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

20 Diabetes-friendly Lunch Recipes

20 Diabetes-friendly Lunch Recipes

Spiced Couscous Tomatoes Choose ripe, well-flavoured tomatoes for this dish. Hollowed out, tomatoes make the perfect container for a spicy eggplant, dried apricot and nut couscous. Serve the spiced couscous tomatoes with sesame breadsticks. Tarragon Chicken Salad Tahini, a paste made from sesame seeds, is a favourite ingredient in Middle Eastern cooking. Available at most large grocery stores, it adds a nutty taste and thick creaminess to the dressing for this nutritious tarragon chicken and baby spinach salad. Watermelon and Feta Salad In this salad, the salty tang of creamy feta cheese contrasts with pieces of sweet watermelon and juicy golden nectarines. A mix of arugula, endive and leaf lettuce adds a slightly peppery taste, while the toasted pumpkin seeds give it a nice crunch. Based on fattoush (the colourful, crunchy salad served throughout the Middle East), this version adds tuna for extra flavour and protein. Get the full recipe Citrus and Spinach Salad Fresh leaf spinach pairs well with citrus fruits, melon and prosciutto. Here the spinach is tossed with the fruits and their juices and then drizzled with a creamy and sweet balsamic dressing. A little prosciutto is used to top the salad, so you get the flavour without adding too much fat! Summer Salmon and Asparagus Fresh young vegetables and succulent salmon make this casserole highly nutritious, and it is also quick to prepare. Choose tiny leeks, tender asparagus and sugar-snap peas, all of which add visual appeal to the dish. Serve boiled new potatoes with the summer salmon and asparagus for a complete meal. Grilled Salmon in Ciabatta Here fresh salmon fillets are marinated, then lightly grilled and served in warm ciabatta rolls with mixed salad leaves and a basil mayonnaise, to create a very tempting and sp Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, it's easy to get carried away with the notion of a diabetic diet. But in reality, your child's dietary needs are no different from a child who doesn't have diabetes. Of course, there are certain considerations you need to be aware of, and understanding the carbohydrate content in food is arguably the most important. In this article, you will learn about the importance of carb counting, with a special emphasis on how fiber and sugar alcohols may also affect your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Nutrition Basics There's really no such thing as a diabetic diet. That's why you should focus instead on providing your child with balanced nutrition. A good nutritional resource to consult is the Food Pyramid. In recent years, the United States Department of Agriculture has made some updates to the standard Food Pyramid that most of us grew up knowing. Instead of being a set-in-stone guideline, now you can create personalized eating plans that are flexible and balanced. To refresh your memory on healthy eating, visit ChooseMyPlate.gov. There are 3 main nutrients in foods—fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. These essential nutrients affect blood glucose in different ways. Fats: Fat typically doesn't break down into sugar in your blood, and in small amounts, it doesn't affect your blood glucose levels. But fat does slow down digestion, and this can cause your blood glucose to rise slower than it normally would. After a high-fat meal, your child's blood glucose may be elevated up to 12 hours after the meal. Proteins: Protein doesn't affect blood glucose unless you eat more than your body needs. In most cases, you need only about 6 ounces or less (which is about the size of 2 decks of cards) at each meal. Carbohydrates: Carbohyd Continue reading >>

Back-to-school Lunchbox Ideas For Diabetics

Back-to-school Lunchbox Ideas For Diabetics

Back-to-School Lunchbox Ideas for Diabetics Packing school lunches for kids with diabetes can be challenging, but it doesnt have to be. All you have to do is focus on fun; healthy foods that will help them manage blood glucose levels and keep them energized throughout the day. There are numerous school lunch ideas that are suitable for kids and even adults. Set yourself up for success and pack a Transcend glucose gel as well. With 15g of fast-acting glucose, our gel is always the best choice for treating lows withoutovertreating. Its better to make your own lunches, vs. purchasing the traditional box lunches and most importantly, make them fun for kids to eat. Plus, you have control over the quality of the ingredients and the contents. School lunches are often loaded with We've created a brief list of healthy school lunch ideas for kids with diabetes and adults too! Use these ideas to build lunches or create your own ideas. Baby carrots, snap peas or cherry tomatoes Hummus with pieces of whole wheat pita bread Salad with pieces of grilled or baked chicken Turkey dogs and low-fat cheese cut into small pieces Vegetable sticks with your child's favorite low-fat dipping sauce To get your child more involved with making his or her own lunch, ask your child to help. Most kids love to assemble and prep food. Give them some choices from each food group and let them mix and match what they want for lunch. If the lunch contains something your child has chosen and packed, he or she will be more likely to eat it. Make packing lunch a fun activity by using cookie cutters on cold cuts and pieces of fruit! One of the main reasons to pack your lunch is that it makes it easier to avoid unhealthychoices. School lunches often rely on things that are too sugary for Diabetics. There will s Continue reading >>

Healthy School Lunches For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Healthy School Lunches For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Healthy school lunches for people with type 1 diabetes > Healthy school lunches for people with type 1 diabetes Packing school lunches and keeping kids excited about lunch seems to be a daunting task these days. Gone are the days where all you get is a good old peanut butter and jam sandwich. Over the last decade more research has surfaced on the importance of healthy eating and ensuring you get all the correct nutrients to fuel your body. Relying on the local corner store, petrol station, vending machine or fast food joint isnt smart as these options are often higher in calories, unhealthy fats and sodium. Packing lunch is a great way to ensure that you or your loved ones are getting a nutritious meal to keep you going throughout the day. This practice is not only cost-effective in this time of escalating food prices but also ensures you that can have 100 % control of what foods you are choosing as well as portions. Make a sandwich: For many South Africans a packed lunch often consists of a sandwich as its quick, easy and requires no refrigeration. When packing a sandwich, use these tips to ensure you are getting the most from your sandwich. Replace high GI, refined, white bread for low GI, whole wheat, brown, rye or seed bread. These options are higher in fibre, vitamins and minerals and keep you fuller for longer. For those who dont like bread, try a whole wheat wrap, pita bread or whole grain crackers. Where possible choose a protein filling for your sandwich, as it takes longer to digest and will keep you fuller for longer. Choose leaner, less processed meats such as eggs, tuna, grilled or smoked chicken, reduced fat cold meats and reduced or low fat cheeses. Add vegetables to your sandwich such as lettuce, baby spinach, tomato, cucumber, gherkins, carrots or pepp Continue reading >>

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

Indulge in these diabetic-friendly dishes Not all low-carb, low-sugar meals have to be tasteless. Check out this collection of recipes to find a dish perfect for every course. Applesauce Pancakes Trading butter for applesauce is a healthy way to cut out excess fat and still enjoy the sweetness of pancakes. Try this recipe: Applesauce Pancakes Continue reading >>

6 Lunch Ideas For Tweens With Carb Counts For Type 1 Diabetic Kids

6 Lunch Ideas For Tweens With Carb Counts For Type 1 Diabetic Kids

Ive gone back to lunch-making this school year. While I used to do this all the time, a couple of years ago my kids decided they wanted to buy lunch at school. This school year, with my oldest childs Type 1 Diabetes diagnosis, I decided that I needed to make his lunch. While the school nurse (who is great) would have worked with me to count the carbs, there isnt a lotof time for my son to get lunch, run downstairs with his tray and then do test his blood sugar and take his insulin and then go back up and have much time to eat. So, its back to making lunches! Besides dealing with Mr. Picky Eater 1.os pickiness, I have to make sure I give him the appropriate number of carbs and a balanced lunch. Oh the lunches have to be 6th grader approved too. When I started to think about the lunches Id have to pack, the first thing we thought was no sugar at all, but my kid can have that in modified portions. Its the carbs we need to watch. However, I couldnt go too low carb, because he needs around 66 carbs per meal. His snacks can be low/no carb (but I usually pack string cheese with cold packs thats a post for another time). He needs carbs and he needs to be able to eat quickly so this is what Ive come up with for the first two weeks of school. Boars Head Buffalo Chicken, shredded carrots and romaine lettuce ona JosephsFlax, Oat Bran Lavash (17 carbs for a huge piece), Hummus (9 carbs), 1/2 cup blueberries (11 carbs),Horizon Organic milk box (13 carbs) and Fritos (16 carbs). The total is 66 carbs. Roasted Turkey, spinach, and hummus ona JosephsFlax, Oat Bran Lavash (17 carbs, 3 carbs for spinach, and 9 carbs for the hummus), Skyr yogurt (13 carbs), small apple (15 carbs) and Horizon Organic milk box (13 carbs). The total is 70 carbs. Buffalo Chicken, spinach, and hummus ona Joseph Continue reading >>

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