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Type 1 Diabetes Kit

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

Tips On Creating A First-rate First-aid Kit

Tips On Creating A First-rate First-aid Kit

Tips on Creating a First-Rate First-Aid Kit What people with diabetes need to be prepared for emergencies When it comes to your health, preparing for the worst isnt pessimistic. Its smart. Thats why experts advise everyone to stash medical supplies for a rainy day. Or, you know, a day when youve just sliced your finger, sprained your ankle, or broken out in hives. A well-stocked first-aid kit is easy to prepare and useful in both minor and more serious emergencies. The bathroom may seem like the ideal spot to stash the essentials, but because of heat and humidity, its not the best place to keep medicine or many diabetes supplies. Instead, store your first-aid kit in a room where you spend a lot of time or in an easy-to-reach area of a closet. Creating your own kit is easy. Start with a waterproof container, then add the supplies listed ("In the Kit," below). As far as medications go, experts recommend adding baby aspirin to the mix, which can help during a heart attack. (After calling 911, chew four baby aspirin or one non-coated adult aspirin. Chewed aspirin works faster than swallowed pills.) Theres less of a consensus about other medications. Those that must be kept cold, such as insulin, dont need to be included. Others, such as cough syrup, ibuprofen, and antidiarrheal drugs, can be added to the mix. The tricky part is keeping items current. If youre going to put medications in there, anything that can potentially expire, you want to check that often, says David Berry, PhD, ATC, an athletic trainer, professor at Weber State University, and member of the American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council. He recommends reviewing the items in your first-aid kit at least twice a year and replacing anything that is expired. Also remember to refill the kit as you use items Continue reading >>

Emergency Preparedness For Type 1 Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness For Type 1 Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness for Type 1 Diabetes From the wrath of Hurricane Sandy along the eastern seaboard to devastating wildfires in the west, the past two years have shattered previous records for natural disaster destruction in the United States. The hardships and chaos these catastrophes cause are difficult enough. But factor in the added demands of managing type 1 diabetes (T1D), and a bad situation can get much worse. No matter where you live, you should have a plan for taking care of yourself and your diabetes in an emergency situation. Kim Kaar lives in southeastern Connecticut with her husband Marko and their three childrenEmily, 18, Gabriel, 10, and Alex, 14, who was diagnosed with T1D at eighteen months of age. Just blocks from Long Island Sound in one direction, and the Connecticut River in the other, the Kaar family has ridden out their fair share of storms over the years. Possessing a mentality of always be prepared has made it fairly easy to keep type 1 diabetes care consistent, Kim explains. Despite the challenges of two hurricanes and a major blizzard over the past two years, advance planning and a well-stocked diabetes emergency kit has kept Alexs T1D safely in check through flooding and extended electrical power loss. But the Kaars may be in the minority. Even though it is something that I always talk to them about, before Superstorm Sandy hit last year, most of my patients did not have realistic emergency plans in place, laments New York-based diabetes educator Susan Weiner, RD, MS, CDE. People just dont think it will happen to themuntil it happens to them. Organization and checklists are key to making it through an emergency, according to Mrs. Weiner, author of the upcoming book The Complete Diabetes Organizer (Spry Publishing, Fall 2013). Think thro Continue reading >>

What To Pack In Your Diabetes Emergency Kit

What To Pack In Your Diabetes Emergency Kit

No matter the season, Mother Nature can wreak havoc in our lives. Other emergencies can turn our world upside down. For those people with type 1 diabetes, always being prepared is essential. Below is a list of things that should be in your diabetes emergency kit. Excerpted from Kids First, Diabetes Second by Leighann Calentineand published by Spry Publishing; available wherever books are sold. Diabetes Preparedness Kit My daughter with type 1 diabetes, Quinn, learned about “preparedness” at school and had the idea to make a diabetes preparedness kit at home. Every part of the country has some type of severe weather, and you need to be prepared in case you have to take shelter or leave the house quickly. I’m not sure why I hadn’t thought of this before. In the past when we heard tornado sirens, I swooped up some supplies and ran downstairs. Now we have a kit stocked with everything we might need (except insulin), and I keep it in the pantry where we take cover. We store insulin in the refrigerator because it needs to be kept cool, but we can quickly grab it if needed. Keep your kit in a designated spot so that it can be grabbed quickly, and don’t forget to rotate any supplies that might expire. The plastic container we purchased has two interlocking tiers. The diabetes supplies are in the top tier, and bottled water and snacks are in the bottom. We also take the kit with us when we travel or go camping, or when Quinn has a sleepover at her grandparents’ house. Diabetes Preparedness Kit (Tailor to the supplies that you use.) Plastic container, ideally with a handle so that it’s portable Blood glucose meter Blood glucose test strips Blood ketone meter and blood ketone strips OR urine ketone strips Lancing device Lancets Alcohol swabs Syringes (for both MDI an Continue reading >>

Diabetes First Aid Kits

Diabetes First Aid Kits

It's a good idea to have a diabetes 'first aid' kit for times of highs, lows and in emergencies People with diabetes have lengthy lists of medication, equipment and devices to keep track of. This is why it can be so useful to have first aid kits. Having first aid kits at home, when going out, and for dramatic changes in blood glucose levels can be easy to prepare and useful in potentially serious situations. Depending on where you are, there are a number of emergency kits you can set up for yourself. A hypo and hyper kit can be kept on your person at home, and when youre out. You should make sure you replenish supplies when they are low so you dont run out when you need them. Your blood glucose meter - including extra test strips and lancets Fast-acting glucose, such as an energy drink (e.g. Lucozade) and/or tablets Medical identification - such as an identity card, if you choose not to wear any A popular product for hypos are GlucoTabs. Buy GlucoTabs from the Diabetes Shop . Your blood glucose meter - including extra test strips and lancets Spare insulin vials for injections (but only if you can store these in a fridge) Ketone testing strips - if you take insulin While most of your medication will be stored at home, some things will not be appropriate for a first aid kit. Insulin, for example, should be kept in the fridge. Additionally, you should keep your first aid kit away from rooms with heat and humidity, such as the bathroom, and store them in a room where the kit is easy to reach. Items in this kit should be reviewed at least twice a year and you should replace anything expired, or close to expiring. Additional testing supplies, such as strips and lancets Extra batteries for your meter, continuous glucose monitor or insulin pump You only need to consider the es Continue reading >>

Diabetes Supplies To Have When You Leave Home

Diabetes Supplies To Have When You Leave Home

Diabetes Supplies to Have When You Leave Home Diabetes Supplies to Have When You Leave Home Diabetes travel kits are important to have on hand whether you are going across the country or across town. The only difference is the quantity of supplies you take along. Unfortunately, most people with diabetes do not leave home prepared to deal with the range of situations they might confront. So, what are those essential diabetes supplies that you should always have within reach? Here is a checklist. Glucose meter . Your glucose meter should be with you at all times, even if you are just going to the grocery store. You never know when you night need to check your blood sugar. Extra battery for meter (and insulin pump if you use one). You dont want your meter to lose battery power right before you sit down to nice meal at your favorite restaurant. Glucose meter batteries differ by manufacturer. Learn the type of battery your meter uses and keep a spare in your testing kit. Insulin pumps will typically let you know when your battery is low, but it doesnt hurt to carry a spare. Test strips. Always keep an ample supply of test strips with you in case you need to test more frequently than you anticipate. Lancing device and lancets. Carry at least the number of lancets needed for an entire day of testing. It is preferable to not reuse a lancet since it is not sterile after a single use and is more dull, which increases the discomfort. Insulin. If the weather is warm, you might also want to include an insulated bag with some cold packs to keep your insulin cool. Syringes (or other insulin delivery device). If you are using syringes, take at least the average number you would need for an entire day, preferably more. Keytone strips. You may only use these rarely while away from home Continue reading >>

Slideshow: Your Diabetes Supply Kit For Emergencies

Slideshow: Your Diabetes Supply Kit For Emergencies

When you have a condition like diabetes, a trip away from home means packing a few extra items: the supplies you use to take care of yourself. And if a disaster like a hurricane or fire strikes, or even if you have simple power failure, you may need to leave your home right away. Gather a few key things ahead of time and store them in an easy-to-grab "go bag" so you're ready to head out at a moment's notice. Put aside 7 days' worth of any medicine you take. If you have type 2 diabetes, that probably includes pills that help your body use insulin better. People who have type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 will need to pack a supply of insulin and syringes or insulin pens. Check your stash every so often to make sure nothing has expired. A cold pack and insulated bag is a good idea for anyone who uses a medicine that normally goes in the refrigerator. That includes exenatide, insulin, and pramlintide. Don't forget about the items you'll need to test your blood sugar, such as: Empty plastic bottle or sharps container for lancets (as well as needles and syringes, if you use them) If your doctor has told you to check for ketones, you should carry ketone test strips, too. If you have type 1 diabetes and use an insulin pump, you should also pack: It's important to stay hydrated, especially if your blood sugar levels tend to get too high. Put aside enough bottled water to last you at least 3 days. You should also pack at least 2 days' worth of food that won't spoil. Good picks include peanut butter, cheese crackers, meal replacement shakes, and granola bars. Canned food is also smart. Just remember the non-electric can opener. You can buy a premade kit or create your own. Some key items to include: adhesive bandages, antibiotic ointment, hydrocortisone cream, pain and Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Resource Provides Tools And Support To Families Of Newly-diagnosed Children With Type 1 Diabetes

New Diabetes Resource Provides Tools And Support To Families Of Newly-diagnosed Children With Type 1 Diabetes

New Diabetes Resource Provides Tools and Support to Families of Newly-Diagnosed Children with Type 1 Diabetes "KidCare Kit" offers quick-reference materials and multimedia tools to guide families through the first 30 days following a child's diagnosis BRIDGEWATER, N.J., Feb. 3 / PRNewswire-FirstCall / -- Sanofi-aventis U.S. announced today the availability of the diabetes KidCare Kit, a multimedia resource that will provide children and their families with valuable tools and information to help guide them through the difficult but crucial first 30 days following a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. The KidCare Kit was developed in partnership with Children with Diabetes, a national diabetes advocacy group offering support and education for children with diabetes and their families, and is the product of more than a year of research and feedback collected from families of children with diabetes, physicians, certified diabetes educators and other healthcare professionals from across the country. The kit is now available free of charge at participating hospitals and doctor's offices nationwide to families with children that have just received a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes in children and each year more than 15,000 children are diagnosed with diabetes in the United States, which is approximately 40 children per day. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International (JDRF) estimates that as many as 3 million Americans may have type 1 diabetes. "When a child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes it impacts the entire family and parents can often feel emotionally and physically overwhelmed in the first weeks and months following their child's diagnosis," stated Jeff Hitchcock, founder and CEO of Children with Diabetes. "With Continue reading >>

Emergency Preparedness For Type 1 Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness For Type 1 Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness for Type 1 Diabetes From the wrath of Hurricane Sandy along the eastern seaboard to devastating wildfires in the west, the past two years have shattered previous records for natural disaster destruction in the United States. The hardships and chaos these catastrophes cause are difficult enough. But factor in the added demands of managing type 1 diabetes (T1D), and a bad situation can get much worse. No matter where you live, you should have a plan for taking care of yourself and your diabetes in an emergency situation. Kim Kaar lives in southeastern Connecticut with her husband Marko and their three childrenEmily, 18, Gabriel, 10, and Alex, 14, who was diagnosed with T1D at eighteen months of age. Just blocks from Long Island Sound in one direction, and the Connecticut River in the other, the Kaar family has ridden out their fair share of storms over the years. Possessing a mentality of always be prepared has made it fairly easy to keep type 1 diabetes care consistent, Kim explains. Despite the challenges of two hurricanes and a major blizzard over the past two years, advance planning and a well-stocked diabetes emergency kit has kept Alexs T1D safely in check through flooding and extended electrical power loss. But the Kaars may be in the minority. Even though it is something that I always talk to them about, before Superstorm Sandy hit last year, most of my patients did not have realistic emergency plans in place, laments New York-based diabetes educator Susan Weiner, RD, MS, CDE. People just dont think it will happen to themuntil it happens to them. Organization and checklists are key to making it through an emergency, according to Mrs. Weiner, author of the upcoming book The Complete Diabetes Organizer (Spry Publishing, Fall 2013). Think thro Continue reading >>

2 Free #diabetes Kits For Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Children

2 Free #diabetes Kits For Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Children

If you have a child newly diagnosed with diabetes, here are a couple of free kits that will help your family as you embark on this new journey. 1. The Everyday Wisdom ™ Kit offered by the American Diabetes Association. This is a tool designed to help families of children with Type 1 diabetes live with diabetes everyday. The Everyday Wisdom Kit helps families plan for everyday moments and events such as birthday parties, playing sports and getting behind the wheel. The kit comes in a reusable lunch bag and includes: – A guide for parents – A guide for the child with diabetes – A guide for the teen with diabetes – A guide for the sibling – An interactive card game for the whole family – An informational and inspirational DVD – Juggling balls – Emergency Contact Information refrigerator magnet – Pocket-sized Carb Counting Tool – Diabetes Dictionary This interactive toolkit was designed for families of kids with newly diagnosed diabetes ages 8 and over. Thanks to an educational grant by Lilly, the Everyday Wisdom Kit is available for free. 2. The Bag of Hope offered by JDRF. JDRF’s Bag of Hope program is a free resource which provides information and support to families with children who are newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes (within the last 3 months). The Bag of Hope is filled with relevant diabetes education materials, some intended to communicate directly with the child and some geared toward the adult caregiver, including Rufus, the Bear with Diabetes, Rufus Comes Home book, A First Book for Understanding Diabetes, other reference books, a DVD, and an Accu-Chek® Aviva Compact Blood Meter. The cuddly Rufus is sure to brighten a child’s day! Lastly as a bonus “freebie,” ask your diabetes clinic if they have the Lilly Disney picture books Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Resources And Support

Type 1 Diabetes Resources And Support

Find support you need when you need it most Whether you're interested in joining a vibrant online T1D community, in need of advice from someone who’s been there or looking for educational tools to help you or your loved one manage the disease—JDRF is here to help. Whatever your question and wherever you are, JDRF’s online T1D resource community connects you with others—online or in your area—who’ve been where you are. Support and information near you JDRF chapters offer a variety of events to inform, support and connect you with the T1D community. Along with several generous partners, we provide information to help you understand and better manage the daily burden of T1D to stay as strong and healthy as possible. When your child receives a diagnosis of T1D, it can feel overwhelming. As you adjust to life with T1D, you’ll find helpful information and support in the JDRF Bag of Hope®. The JDRF T1D Care Kit is a free resource providing information and tools to educate, support and inspire adults newly diagnosed with T1D. Toolkits for all ages and stages Our free T1D toolkits for parents, adults and educators are comprehensive guides that arm you with the knowledge, resources and confidence you and your family need to navigate life with T1D. Continue reading >>

The On-the-go T1d Kit

The On-the-go T1d Kit

The “T1D On-The-Go Kit” is the extra back-up of supplies that you may need if your car breaks down or you’ve forgotten something when you’re on the go — it could be for a sporting event from home, in the car for your work commute, at the studio, gym or any other place you frequent. It is not intended for long duration emergency care that you find in the Natural Disaster Emergency Kit. This kit should go with you when you’re on the move and used in the event that you need something extra. Remember: Use any bag that is easy to identify, secure and has enough space to hold everything. You may consider getting a waterproof or insulated bag. It is a good idea to label your bag with name and medical ID as well as contact details. Consider getting a system like Tile to keep track of your bag and locate it in case it gets lost. Diabetes Travel Essentials The go-to device for testing your blood sugar levels. Insulin The American Diabetes Association recommends packing a 3-day supply. Include short-acting as well as long-acting insulin. When insulin is kept cool at the recommended temperature of 36° F – 46° F, it will last until its expiration date. Unrefrigerated insulin can be stored at a temperature between 59°F-86°F and may be effective up to 28 days. Don’t forget to rotate supplies so that your emergency kit does not contain expired products. A Cooler (Optional) Include 4 reusable ice packs to keep insulin cool. (FRIO makes insulin pouches that cool when submerged in water.) Never use insulin that has been frozen. Syringes and/ or Pen Needles Both deliver insulin; it depends on what’s your instrument of choice. If you are on a pump you should carry emergency needles and insulin vials, or an emergency pen in case of failure. Also, carry extra syringes fo Continue reading >>

American Girl Has A Hit With Diabetes Doll Kit

American Girl Has A Hit With Diabetes Doll Kit

Well | American Girl Has a Hit With Diabetes Doll Kit American Girl Has a Hit With Diabetes Doll Kit Anja Busse, 13, plays with her American Girl doll, Alice, and her diabetes care kit at her home in Antigo, Wis.Credit Corey J. Schjoth for The New York Times Sign up for our Well Family newsletter. Each week, get the latest news on parenting, child health and relationships plus advice from our experts to help every family live well. Children with Type 1 diabetes cant make their own insulin, so they have to count carbs, prick their fingers to check their blood sugar and get regular insulin infusions. Now they can also give that care to their dolls. American Girl, the doll company, has introduced a diabetes care kit for dolls, and it has been available only intermittently because its so popular. The kit, which sells for $24, has 10 doll-size make-believe items, including a blood sugar monitor, a lancing device, an insulin pump that can be clipped to a dolls waistband with an adhesive to attach the infusion set, as well as an insulin injection pen needle (for dolls not using the pump). There are also a vial of pretend glucose tablets, a medical bracelet, an ID card, logbook and stickers, and everything fits in a bright fuchsia carrying case the size of a small change purse. Anja Busse, a 13-year-old from Antigo, Wis., who has Type 1 diabetes, has wanted a kit like this for her doll since she learned she had diabetes just over two years ago. She started an online petition urging American Girl to make diabetes accessories for the dolls, rallying the Type 1 diabetes community and garnering 7,000 signatures. Anja learned that she had the disease in October, 2013, when she was 11. That Christmas, she got her first American Girl doll which had hazel eyes, blond hair and freckles Continue reading >>

Emergency Preparedness: Diabetes Emergency Kit

Emergency Preparedness: Diabetes Emergency Kit

Recently, Hurricane Harvey has disastrously impacted Texas, including individuals with chronic medical conditions and disabilities. One man in particular recently shared his story of escaping the hurricane and wading through dangerous waters to retrieve his diabetes medications. When disaster strikes whether it be a hurricane, earthquake, power outage or other emergency situation, preparedness is key. It’s important to become educated on the potential consequences of disaster situations as well as developing an emergency kit and disaster plan. We recommend organizing a minimum of 7 days worth of supplies for a disaster situation for yourself and all the members of your family including pets. Develop an Emergency Plan Develop a comprehensive plan for emergency situations. Some important factors to consider: Communication Plan: How will you connect with family, friends, and doctors? Disaster Plan: Determine safe places in your home, family meeting spots, and what you’ll do if disaster strikes. Make a disaster kit: Include all the items you’ll need in the event of an emergency. Continuing reading to see our full list! Prepare to Stay and to Evacuate When developing your emergency kit and plan, it’s important to consider two main scenarios. Firstly, you may be trapped in your home for an extended period of time. Do you have enough supplies in place in the event you’re unable to travel to a store? What if stores are out of supplies? Do you have everything you would need to stay in your home for an extended period of time? Particularly consider you should pay special attention to what you would need if you didn’t have power or running water in your home. Secondly, consider the items that you would need to take with you if you were forced to evacuate. How are you g Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care Kit For Dolls

Diabetes Care Kit For Dolls

Inventory may fluctuate and cannot be guaranteed. This set comes with a variety of pretend doll-sized tools to help girls care for their Truly Me dolls with diabetes. It includes: An insulin pump that can be clipped to a doll's waistband, plus an adhesive to attach the infusion set An insulin pen, for dolls that aren't using the pump A special case for the supplies, plus an ID card By clicking "Sign up" you are agreeing to receive emails and notifications from American Girl. Please read our PRIVACY STATEMENT and TERMS AND CONDITIONS when you visit our site. Copyright 2018 American Girl. All American Girl marks are trademarks of American Girl. 1Save up to 65% off clearance items by combining clearance price discount and promotional code. Save up to 50% off clearance items through 5/31/18 or while supplies last; promotional quantities may be limited. Save an additional 15% with promo code 15MORE through 5/31/18 or while supplies last; promotional quantities may be limited. Offer valid only at American Girl online and U.S. American Girl retail stores. Not valid at Amazon, Kohls, Toys R Us, or Barnes & Noble retail locations or websites. No refunds or adjustments on previous purchases, returns or exchanges, or orders in progress that have not yet shipped. We reserve the right to limit order and item quantities. Unfortunately, the offer will not be extended if you are unable to order due to technical issues. 2Flat-rate US standard shipping of $5.95 with a purchase of $100 or more. Offer valid through 11:59 p.m. Central Time on 5/31/2018 on phone, mail, fax, and americangirl.com orders with valid offer code. To redeem this offer at americangirl.com, enter the offer code in the box marked offer code in your shopping bag or at checkout. Flat-rate shipping of $5.95 and savings Continue reading >>

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