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Type 1 Diabetes Information For Coaches

Diabetes Coaching & Online Personal Training | Diabetes Strong

Diabetes Coaching & Online Personal Training | Diabetes Strong

High or low blood sugars during and after exercise? Not being able to reduce your A1C and being stuck on the blood sugar roller coaster? Not being able to lose weight or build muscle? Not knowing what to eat and how to exercise to reach your diabetes, health and fitness goals? Then let me support you in reaching your health and diabetes goals. I offer individualized online diabetes coaching sessions to address whats most important to you when it comes to managing your health and diabetes.The time is yours, and my goal is that you will leave each session with the tool and knowledge to move forward successfully. If you are interested in scheduling a 15-minute introduction call to learn more about my approach, please send me a message by using the form at the bottom of this page. As a type 1 diabetic, I admit I was often afraid to go to the gym because I was afraid of going hypoglycemic. Christel really helped me learn how to manage my sugars, giving me the confidence I needed to get back to the gym on a regular basis. Christel gave me a workout and meal plan that was tailored to my specific likes and dislikes. The workouts are challenging (but not so hard I cant do them) and the meals are structured, but flexible enough that I was able to have some variety. I definitely got results! Christel was always willing to answer questions and change up meals when I asked. Id recommend online personal training with Christel to anyone! Working with Christel was amazing! My greatest take-away from 3 months of training with her was learning how to eat before and after a workout to help control my blood sugars. Before working with her, i always struggled to workout hard because my blood sugar would always be either low or high. I also never did weightlifting because i didnt know where Continue reading >>

About Diabetes Digital Coach

About Diabetes Digital Coach

Sandra Tweddell, coordinator of the Bristol Diabetes Support Network Generally, people with diabetes only get to see a healthcare professional a few times a year. The rest of the time its down to you to make all the right decisions about your diet, activity and medicines. This is why the Diabetes Digital Coach project has set out to see whether people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes find digital tools useful to help manage their condition and whether they help reduce future health complications. The project has developed an online service for people with diabetes, which is available via smart phone, tablet and PC. Watch our short video here. Designed to enhance the usual support you get from your health care team, the Diabetes Digital Coach aims to help you better understand and manage your condition. Through the Coach, you can get free access to a range of digital tools to help you with different aspects of diabetes. It collects and store information about you, which is easy to access. It is up you how you use this information and you decide who to share it with. If you do decide to share, then it may help you and your healthcare team make better decisions together about your diabetes. We will be evaluating what difference the Diabetes Digital Coach makes to people with diabetes. If you decide to participate, then you will be helping us with this important aspect of the project. If you agree, we may contact you to find out more about what you liked or didnt like about using the Coach. People can sign up to use the Diabetes Digital Coach until 30 June 2018. The project currently runs until the end of July 2018, after which the evaluation report will be published. While we are seeking extra funding to continue after this date, we cannot guarantee it. How does the Diabet Continue reading >>

Get A Free Diabetes Coach Consultation By Daniele Hargenrader

Get A Free Diabetes Coach Consultation By Daniele Hargenrader

Find out if a Diabetes Coach is Right for you: Click HERE and Fill Out the Quick Diabetes Dominator Coaching Questionnaireto Get Your Free 20 Minute Coaching Consultation! ness, and emotional wellness coaching for people with diabetes and without through our comprehensive programs. As a Diabetes Coach, Bestselling Author, Health Coach, and Certified Personal Trainer, with a bachelors degree in nutrition science, I make it my mission to help you achieve your goals and see results faster then you can on your own. No matter what stage of life you are currently in, one-on-one coaching will provide you with the guidance, accountability, insight, training, and focus you are currently missing that is keeping you from reaching the goals you have been working towards. Coaching is key for guidance, accountability, and ultimately, attaining the results youre after. Diabetes Dominator Coaching is not based on hope or on guesswork. It is designed after those who have already achieved the real results you desire through coaching at a higher level. You will work with me and my team directly, and we will tailor your plan to match your individual needs and goals. We will help you measure, track, manage, and support the specifics of your diabetes to ensure that you keep your word to yourself, to me, and to your loved ones who you want to live a long, healthy, happy life with. If you are struggling with everyday diabetes management, what would it mean for you to be able to completely transform your relationship with diabetes, particularly your thoughts and feelings about diabetes, in the next 8-12 weeks and then carry that forward for the rest of your life? How immensely would your overall quality of life improve? How much more happiness, joy, confidence, empowerment and freedom would yo Continue reading >>

One Mind. One Body. One Chance.

One Mind. One Body. One Chance.

I’ve worked with endocrinologists, GPs, clinical psychologists, diabetes nurses, nutritionists and naturopaths. They’ve all prescribed various courses of treatment, but offered little support and understanding of the underlying issues that have been preventing me from succeeding. I went to Lauren with an A1C of 8.5% and after my first consultation with her, I knew this programme was going to be different. She has this energy that is just magnetic, she isn’t judgmental about management in the past - she motivates, educates and inspires. Within the first few weeks of working with Lauren, I was already seeing more steady blood sugar numbers and when I was seeing numbers outside of the optimal range, I was learning more about why that was happening and deconstructing the mindset I had of associating insulin and good diabetes management with weight gain. In three months, my A1C was down to a 7.4 and i'm feeling less like a victim of diabetes, and more like the victor. Lauren Bongiorno has been a Type 1 Diabetic for 16 years and is a Diabetic Health Coach, Yoga Instructor, Nike influencer, and Wellness Speaker. After receiving her health coaching certification through the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Lauren started working with type 1, type 2 and pre-diabetics to take back control of their lives through creating healthy diet and exercise habits that best fit their lifestyle. Her clients learn the tools they need to lower their A1C, get control of their blood sugar levels, increase their insulin sensitivity, lose weight, feel energized and stick to a healthy diet and workout plan to reach their goals. “Lauren’s suggestions and support have helped me lower my A1C from 9.3 to 7.3 in 12 short weeks!“ Many clients experience these benefits while working with La Continue reading >>

Diabetes Coaching: What Is It And Who Needs It?

Diabetes Coaching: What Is It And Who Needs It?

Diabetes Coaching: What is It and Who Needs It? A diabetes coach with T1D explains what this new therapy is all about. Fitness and business coaches have been around for quite some time, helping people get to the next level. Diabetes coaching is no different; its about getting to the next level of where you want to be with your health and happiness. A football player needs more than just a rule book to win a game. He needs a coach to provide a larger perspective, deeper strategy, and personal motivation to go around any barriers to the goal line. While health providers and educators are focused on what to do (the rules), coaches are focused on how you feel about it, what you believe about it, and how to stay motivated long term. Nearly all of my adult life has been spent in healthcare and managing my own Type 1 diabetes. Ive learned that education comes second to motivation. If you were interviewing a potential employee who was disinterested, frustrated, sad, or angry, odds are that your expectation for his or her success would be pretty low. Truth be told, you wouldnt hire someone like that because it isnt logical to expect an excellent performance by an unmotivated person. But every day in healthcare, providers and educators expect us to play the game of diabetes daily, for the rest of our lives and do it perfectly. They focus on education because if we understood the risks, we would change, right? If that were true, smokers wouldnt smoke, we would all work out every day, and McDonalds would be out of business. The truth is, we do what we believe will lead us away from pain and towards pleasure. Period. Willpower and fear motivate us initially but both eventually wear off. And as they do, we slip back into our comfort zones, where we feel safe and cozy: the foods we l Continue reading >>

On Your Mark: How To Talk To The Coach

On Your Mark: How To Talk To The Coach

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney When kids are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, many parents wonder if their child will ever get to participate in sports again. The answer is YES! Exercise is an important part of diabetes management. Your childs coach will have an enormous impact on the whole experience, so its important to connect with him or her right away. The first thing you need to do is help the coach understand that theres no sport a kid with diabetes cant do, says Moira McCarthy, whose daughter has type 1 diabetes. You could mention the names of a few pro athletes with type 1 diabetes, including Olympic swimmer Gary Hall, Jr., who has won a total of 10 medals, and Olympic cross country skier, Kris Freeman. For school sports, youll want to make sure participation is covered in your 504 Plan . For community teams, McCarthy suggests inviting the coach out for coffee to get him or her up to speed on the condition. Discuss what the coach may need to do during practice or game time (such as encourage your child to have a snack or check blood glucose), and what to do in the event of an emergency. Talk about how the coach can identify and deal with low blood sugar, and provide written instructions he or she can refer to later. Make sure you provide your child and the coach any snacks or treatment for low blood sugar that might be needed, such as juice, fruit, cheese and crackers, and glucose tablets. Water is, of course, also important to have on hand to prevent dehydration. Tell the coach your child will always bring a backpack of medical supplies to games, such as testing supplies, medications, and his/her diabetes management plan. The coach should know where these supplies are at all times. Confirm whether or not your child will be allowed to wear a medical Continue reading >>

Diabetes Does Not Have To Keep Your Child From Playing Sports

Diabetes Does Not Have To Keep Your Child From Playing Sports

An even playing field is all most parents hope for as their children enter organized sports. Most of us dont expect our child to be the next LeBron James, but we do want our young ones to have a shot at success just like everyone else. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If your child has diabetes, it doesnt have to hold him or her back from sports. It just requires that parents, medical staff and coaches work together to ensure optimal health of the young athlete. With proper outpatient management, a winning game plan is doable. Diabetes is incredibly common, says orthopaedic specialist Dominic King, DO . If you have an organized way to coach young athletes, you should have an organized way to treat athletes with diabetes. Control is the operative word, Dr. King says. The management of a child athlete with diabetes is very similar to managing any child who is an athlete, Dr. King says. Just like you watch all athletes for injuries, you have to watch diabetic athletes for hypo- or hyperglycemia. With strict attention to blood glucose concentration, diet and hydration , most sports and activities are fair game for children with diabetes. There are no real limitations to activity, Dr. King says. In fact, there are some specific benefits in regards to improved blood glucose control and an overall healthy lifestyle. There are a few more extreme sporting activities such as rock climbing, skydiving or scuba diving that you would probably want your child to avoid if he or she has diabetes. Dr. King warns against anything that, if you passed out during the activity, you could be in life-threatening danger. Also, make sure that your childs Continue reading >>

A Coach’s Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

A Coach’s Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

What is Type 1? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that affects a person’s pancreas. The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, a hormone people need to get energy from food. Our pancreas, for reasons that have not been identified, does not produce any insulin. As a result, we need to inject or continually infuse insulin through a pump and carefully balance our insulin doses with eating and daily activities. We must also regularly monitor our blood-sugar levels. Type 1 is a non-stop and 24/7 balancing act that we must maneuver every day. There is no way to prevent Type 1 and there is no cure (currently!). How do you manage it? We get by with a little help from our friends! These include our glucose meter, insulin, needles and monitors. The glucose meter is a device that measures blood sugar. We use a device that pricks our finger and we put the blood sample onto a test strip. From there, the test strip is read by the meter and gives us a number on the meter screen. We can get insulin into our bodies through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. Injections are delivered to our bodies through insulin pens and needles. There are two types of insulin that we use: Fast-acting insulin gives our bodies insulin right away and is taken with meals or to correct a high blood sugar. Fast-acting insulin is used multiple times a day, depending on when you eat. The other is long-acting insulin, which is given once a day. Long-acting insulin is a slow release insulin that is given to your body in a span of 24 hours when needed. An insulin pump is a device that is connected to the body, either through a tube or wirelessly. With the control of a device, you are constantly getting insulin through the pump. During meals, we can choose how much insulin to give, and t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Client: 4 Things Every Coach Should Know And Do

Diabetes And Your Client: 4 Things Every Coach Should Know And Do

Obesity and diabetes are growing problems all over the world. These two health conditions often go hand in hand, but they’re not mutually exclusive. According to the International Federation of Diabetes, at least 415 million people suffered from diabetes in 2015. This number is expected to rise to 642 million by 2040. That’s a serious problem. As personal trainers, we can play a key role in promoting a healthier way of living for our clients, as well as assist with the management and prevention of diabetes. It all starts with proper education. Diabetes 101: Know how to help your client with diabetes. Diabetes is a complex disease. One of the most celebrated Greek physicians, Aretaeus of Cappadocia, described diabetes as a “melting down of flesh and limbs into the urine.” It sounds morbid, but that’s a fairly accurate description. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. They’re both related to impaired glucose control, but the difference is in the onset of the disease. * Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that’s associated with genetic defects, intestinal permeability (leaky gut), and environmental triggers, such as infections and viruses. * Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that is characterized by insulin resistance (that is, the body’s inability to effectively use insulin) in combination with insufficient insulin production by the pancreas. Together this results in high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia). Type 2 diabetes is commonly associated with obesity and physical inactivity. Medication is important in the treatment of type 1 and serious cases of type 2 diabetes. Both conditions require serious lifestyle modifications for proper long-term management. So what are the best preventative and treatment measures Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For Coaching Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

Top 10 Tips For Coaching Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

a) Safe glucose levels before during and after exercise b) Recognizing signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia d) Ensure availability and access to glucose monitoring equipment and snacks at all times e) Do not make food decisions for athlete II. Understanding how the Time of Day impacts glucose levels a) Glucose management requirements may change at different times of the day b) Glucose management will be different if practice times and games times are different III. Communicate: Athletes and parents can be prepared if they know ahead of time a) Time and duration of practice and games c) Meal times and plans if traveling or participating in all day events d) Opportunities for testing and snacking e) Warning of times when testing and snacking may be difficult a) Create practice environment that makes glucose management easy and discreet b) Stand up for athletes needs and requirements to officials and teammates c) Include athlete in all team functions d) Be aware of the emotional toll failure or missed opportunities due to T1D issues or difficulty can have on a T1D athlete. e) Support and encourage athlete when having trouble managing glucose levels f) Do not punish athlete by withholding playing time or participation due to glucose management needs A. Safe glucose levels before during and after exercise: First and most importantly, T1D athletes must always check their blood glucose before beginning any exercise or activity. Depending on blood glucose level, the athlete may start exercising immediately, or may have to postpone exercise until blood glucose levels are in an acceptable range. Each T1D athlete is unique and may have different personal experiences with blood glucose levels. Safe glucose levels when beginning exercise or activity: Lower than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Coach You Can Trust

A Diabetes Coach You Can Trust

How diabetes educators see people with diabetes differently – research from the American Association of Diabetes Educators conference In August, thousands gathered in Indianapolis for the 2017 American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) conference. At the meeting, Dr. Julie Gee presented her research on the key role that diabetes educators play in promoting care that puts people with diabetes in the driver’s seat. The study analyzed responses from over 200 diabetes educators who were assessed on their beliefs towards self-management in people with diabetes as well as strategies they used to support self-management. Survey results showed that diabetes educators scored higher than other healthcare specialists in their belief that self-management is important, meaning they supported ideas such as, “people with diabetes should function as a member of their care team” and “people with diabetes should independently make judgments and seek info.” Diabetes educators also scored high on the Clinician Self-Management Scale, meaning they used strategies like, “Ask the person with diabetes what changes he or she wants to focus on,” and “Tell the person with diabetes you will be their coach, but that they are the one who has to carry out the plan.” The takeaway from this research is that diabetes educators are stand out in their support for and emphasis on self-management for people with diabetes. What do diabetes educators do? Diabetes educators empower people to take control of their own care. When seeing a diabetes educator, you can expect to work on medication strategies, nutritional guidelines, and more. Diabetes educators do not exist to dictate care plans – they are leaders in the movement against paternalistic, one-size-fits-all care. Motivational Continue reading >>

Coaching | Mindful Diabetic

Coaching | Mindful Diabetic

Watch this short video below to learn more about my online group coaching with Cyrus Khambatta, PhD in nutritional biochemistry. If youre interested in applying a low-fat, plant-based whole-foods diet to reverse insulin resistance, gain energy, lose weight, and reduce your dependence on medication, then participating in a coaching program is the fastest and most effective way to make the transition. My coaching programs provide you with the education, motivation, and guidance that you need to make long-term and sustainable changes to your diet. My goal is to show you exactly how to master diabetes once and for all in the same way that many of my current and previous clients have already done. My coaching programs cover the fundamental aspects of a low-fat, plant-based whole-foods lifestyle, and go into detail about the following topics: How to integrate a low-fat, plant-based lifestyle into your daily life How to lose weight while eating more food How to structure an exercise regimen for optimal insulin sensitivity How to control blood glucose before, during, and after exercise How to effectively communicate with your doctor How to adjust basal and bolus insulin use How to reduce or eliminate oral medication How to actually read nutrition facts labels How to navigate social situations like a pro How to grocery shop like a champ and save a lot of money How to prepare meals at home without using oil Together, Dr. Khambatta and I have over 23 years of experience living with type 1 diabetes while following a low-fat, plant-based whole foods lifestyle. INSULIN USAGE: They decrease their total insulin usage while dramatically increasing their carbohydrate intake. A1C VALUES: They always reduce their A1c values, and regularly surprise their doctors. BODY WEIGHT: They lose wei Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nutrition Coaching: Supporting You With Your Type 1 Diabetes Struggles

Diabetes Nutrition Coaching: Supporting You With Your Type 1 Diabetes Struggles

DietSensor Nutrition Coaching – Support For Diabetes Blog DietSensor Diabetes and Nutrition , 31 Janvier 2017 Are you looking for a diabetes diet plan to help you manage your sugar level and avoid diabetes complications?  DietSensor is the solution that you have been looking for.  The DietSensor Nutrition Coach can help to keep your blood glucose at the recommended level. The DietSensor Nutrition Coach will take you on a 12-part journey and will help to establish a diet for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Each part of the program consists of seven days worth of advice, presented each time you log a meal. Missed a few days?  Don’t worry, the program will extend for as many days that you miss. Every time you log a meal, your coach will give you some reading to do on a particular topic, tailoring it to your profile and possibly to the meal you just ate.  It’s as if a nutritionist was standing right by your side. Click “Got it” to no longer see the message and move on to the next one after your next meal.  You will receive tons of advice that you can put into practice.  Everything has been validated by our experts and backed by recognized medical sources. Over the course of 12 parts, you will go through the following steps: Part 1:  The coach gives you some basic information about diabetes, sets your goals, observes your eating habits, and teaches you the basics of nutrition. Part 2:  After a quick review, you’ll focus on the different kinds of carbohydrates as well as on treatments and how they are connected. Part 3:  More focus on carbohydrates, fibers, and concepts like the glycemic index. Part 4:  A closer look at essential carbohydrates, diabetes management and fats to better control your weight. Part 6:  Meals and their varying composition. Par Continue reading >>

Type 1 Training Club Requirements

Type 1 Training Club Requirements

Live your most active life with type 1 diabetes Introducing a 16-week nutrition and fitness group coaching program that can transform your relationship with food, significantly increase your performance and recovery and give you the best blood sugar control you’ve ever had. If you are like most people with type 1 diabetes, then controlling your blood sugar can be a complete mystery. Even if you eat the same foods on a daily basis, your blood sugar responds differently, leaving you feeling frustrated and out of control. The truth is, your blood sugar responds to many environmental factors, and getting a handle on exactly what causes your blood sugar to rise and fall can be completely overwhelming... “Receiving real-time evidence-based fitness and diet coaching was invaluable because the experience allowed me to attain insights that left me feeling supported and generating better results than I had from simply working with my doctor and dietician. This coaching program is customized and offered by a coach living with type 1 diabetes, and that truly distinguishes this program from the rest.” “This program has helped a lot with my base level of anxiety. I’ve always wanted to exercise again, but was worried about hurting myself. Now, I have a plan in place that helps prevent lows and deal with them confidently if they happen. I went from being too tired to go for a walk to craving exercise—I get restless if I skip a day.” “Within three days of starting the first steps of this program, I could immediately feel a difference in my energy levels. Within 3 weeks, I had decreased my daily insulin requirement by 50% and for the first time in two years was able to complete a two hour endurance ride without being limited by a significant hypoglycemic episode.” David Continue reading >>

Care Of The Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review

Care Of The Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review

Care of the Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Clinical Review 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 3Department of Medicine, G.V. Montgomery VA Medical Center, Mississippi, Jackson, United States 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, United States 3Department of Medicine, G.V. Montgomery VA Medical Center, Mississippi, Jackson, United States *Corresponding author: William B. Horton, Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 N State Street, Jackson, Mississippi 39216, United States. Tel: +1-6019845601, Fax: +1-6019846665, E-mail: [email protected] Received 2016 Jan 6; Revised 2016 Feb 24; Accepted 2016 Mar 1. Copyright 2016, Research Institute For Endocrine Sciences and Iran Endocrine Society This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License ( ) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from a highly specific immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic cells, resulting in chronic hyperglycemia. For many years, one of the mainstays of therapy for patients with T1DM has been exercise balanced with appropriate medications and medical nutrition. Compared to healthy peers, athletes with T1DM experience nearly all the same health-related benefits from exercise. Despite these benefits, effective manag Continue reading >>

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