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Type 1 Diabetes Induced At 37 Weeks

Would Love To Hear Some Type 1 Diabetic Birth Stories...

Would Love To Hear Some Type 1 Diabetic Birth Stories...

How did you deliver? What was the reason? C-section due to breech baby Were you induced? No, but it was planned. I did not go into labor on my own. Were you able to breast feed if wanted to? Yes. The planned c-section was a piece of cake for me. I was able to nurse within in a hour of having him and he was in our room the whole hospital stay. They checked his blood sugar every few hours for the first 2 days, but there was no NICU stay since all were in an acceptable range. This time around, I'm hoping to VBAC, so I hope a few respond with stories about vaginal birth. Also, keep in mind that baby's weight is an estimate through ultrasound. Baby might not be as big as he/she is currently measuring (or could be bigger), so don't let them push you into a c-section based on baby's size if you really don't want one. It's more than possible to give birth vaginally even with a larger baby. I hope things work out the way you want them to. Good luck! Thank you all in advance for sharing your stories!!! I had a c/s for pre-eclampsia at 35w0d. We skipped induction, as MFM didn't think I, nor baby, would tolerate labor. Baby was 4 lbs, 10.5 oz at birth, which was pretty close to growth estimate on u/s the week before. I do wear a pump but was put on an IV insulin drip. I had to cut my basals in half while on the drip. DS spent about 28 hours in NICU for hypoglycemia. He had an IV for hypoglycemia while in NICU. I tried to BF but DS never got it. Definitely not my birth plan but DS and I both did well. He was able to come home with us, which was important to us. I EP, and so I'm glad to be able to give DS BM, no matter how he gets it. Good luck! Diagnosis over the past 3 years of doing IF treatments: PCOS, mild endo, MTHFR, Factor II mutation, APAS & autoimmune ovarian failure. 3 cy Continue reading >>

Being Induced At 38 Weeks Standard Practice?

Being Induced At 38 Weeks Standard Practice?

Being induced at 38 weeks standard practice? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Being induced at 38 weeks standard practice? Im almost 36 weeks pregnant and the little on is getting along nicely. His measurements in the Ultrasound are fine and weight is close to the 70th percentile I think macrosomia is identified when the baby is 90th percentile or more. My ob/gyn wants to induce me at 38 weeks. She (and my endo) say its standard practice because the placenta can start degrading after that time. There aren't any complications whatsoever with the pregnancy, this is just what's done with diabetics, apparently. Just wanted to ask the other mommies/mommies-to-be if being induced early has been their experience too. Can you also tell me why its done? Any horror stories/lessons learned you can share? My daughter had gestational diabetes so her experience may not be fully relevant to yours. She was induced at 38 weeks despite very good BG control & clear indications that her baby was NOT above average in size. She has a medium to large frame & did not have any issues with her pelvis being too narrow for a vaginal delivery. The primary area of concern for her was that her blood pressure was higher than normal. We were very lucky in that a wonderful nurse midwife worked with her labor & delivery and, even though labor was started artificially, the nurse midwife took her cues from my daughter's progress and from a fetal heartrate monitor. When it came time to deliver, she was able to do so with four (yes, count them, 4!) pushes. I attribute that to two things: Leah took very good care of herself nutritionally & with regular exercise; a Continue reading >>

Lamaze For Parents : Forums : Gestational Diabetes - Induction At 39 Weeks?

Lamaze For Parents : Forums : Gestational Diabetes - Induction At 39 Weeks?

gestational diabetes - induction at 39 weeks? gestational diabetes - induction at 39 weeks? I am 37 weeks pregnant with my third child. I was diagnosed withGD at 18 weeks; I had it with baby #2, which is why I was screenedearly. I began my pregnancy with normal BMI and have gained 32 poundsto date. I take 22u of NPH insulin at night to control my morningblood sugars (target below 95). I have successfully controlleddaytime blood sugars with diet. Baby has been monitored twiceweekly since 32 weeks (NST on Mondays, biophysicals on Thursdays)and has passed each test with flying colors. Last week, my OB told me she wanted to induce at 39 weeks. Sheindicated that this was "the standard of care" recommended by ACOGfor women with insulin-dependent GD. I protested, saying that Icarried my second child to term. (He weighed 8 lb 14 oz - Idelivered him without pain meds and with minimal pushing - hisblood sugar did crash following the birth, but I labored at homeand had not been instructed about how to monitor my glucose levelsduring labor.) At today's biophysical, baby measured 7 lb 4 oz. I'm aware ofthe high margin of error, but I'm worried this measurement is onlygoing to fuel my OB's fire. Can you please provide me with some studies and/or statistics Ican share with my OB,to support my desire to start labornaturally? I don't like the idea of laboring with Pitosin (whichwould likely equal pain meds), nor am I interested in forcing babyout before she's ready. RE: gestational diabetes - induction at 39 weeks? May 7, 2007 11:15 PM (in response to Archived User ) Asfar as I know, the only reason to induce a woman withwell-controlled diabetes is to reduce the likelihood of having abig baby and the problems that can go along with having a big baby,in particular, need for cesarean sur Continue reading >>

Labour And Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Labour And Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Your birth experience may be different to the one that you had expected, and this can be hard to come to terms with. Finding out what might happen could help you feel mentally prepared for what may lie ahead. It can help to remember that although the birth itself is important, it is just one step in the journey towards having your baby. Where to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes If you have diabetes, it is recommended that you give birth in a hospital with the support of a consultant-led maternity team. It is not unusual for babies of mothers with diabetes to be larger than normal, which could lead to birth difficulties such as shoulder dystocia (in which the baby’s shoulder gets stuck during the birth). This means that options such as home birth are unlikely to be recommended. When to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes You will be advised to give birth early if you have diabetes. This is to reduce the risk of stillbirth. It is recommended by NICE that women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and no other complications should give birth between 37 weeks and 38 weeks +6 days – either by being induced or having a planned caesarean. If you have any complications that pose a risk to you or the baby, you might be offered an even earlier delivery. 'I had always been aware that I would be on the ward for high-risk cases. I am so grateful to be pregnant, I’m not going to complain about stuff like that. If there is an issue, I would rather be ready for it.' Svenja, mum-to-be How to give birth with type 1 or 2 diabetes As the recommendation is to give birth by 38+6 weeks, you are likely to be offered an induction or a caesarean section. Diabetes is not in itself a reason that you cannot have vaginal birth. Unless there are other complications there is no reason this should Continue reading >>

Was Anyone Induced At 37 Weeks With Minimal Dilation? - Circle Of Moms

Was Anyone Induced At 37 Weeks With Minimal Dilation? - Circle Of Moms

All Communities > Working Moms > Was anyone induced at 37 weeks with minimal dilation? Was anyone induced at 37 weeks with minimal dilation? Jennifer - posted on 01/22/2010 ( 27 moms have responded ) There is a possibility I will be able to get induced in my 37th week ( because of Kidney Stent ), but so far at 36 weeks and 2 days I am still only dilated a fingertip. I was induced with my first ( this is my third) but I was already at 4cm and 90% when went in, so it was fast. How do they go about it when you are not far dilated? I'm a doctor I have induced people at 37 weeks and it doesn't depend on dilatation at all its how soft your cervix is. If you have a soft cervix that isn't to long they will break your waters and give you the hormone which your body uses to initiate labour. If your cervix is firm and long they will give you prostaglandin gel to soften it until it is suitable to start labour. Its a process that can take hours or days so take in stuff to do. Early induction has a much higher chance of ending in forceps or section. Good luck hope everything goes well. full term is considered 37 weeks. its the soonest you can have a baby and not be considered preemie. I was induced at 371/2 weeks because of pre-eclampsia (sp?) I was only dilated to 2 but I was 90% effaced. They started a slow drip the night before and then in the morning they turned it up. After they broke my water I dilated much faster and ended up having a natural birth by 3:35 that afternoon. I was induced at 37 weeks because of high blood pressure. They did the meds that was on the string that sits on your cervix wall to soften the cervix the night before then when they checked me in the morning they didn't break my water because i wasn't far enough along they started the pitocin and i was on th Continue reading >>

Management Of Labour In Pregnancy Complicated By Diabetes

Management Of Labour In Pregnancy Complicated By Diabetes

Management of labour in pregnancy complicated by diabetes Sadiah Ahsan Pal ( Consultant Obstetrician & Gynaecologist, OMI Hospital, Karachi. ) Mariam Iqbal Ali ( Senior Lecturer, Department of Healthcare Education, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi. ) Diabetes mellitus complicates <5% of all pregnancies in Pakistan, but is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as maternal morbidity. Appropriate glycaemic control is not only important throughout pregnancy but is equally important during the intra-partum period. Increased blood glucose levels 4-6 hours prior to delivery increase the chances of hypoglycaemia in neonates. It is essential to optimize blood glucose levels during the intra-partum period as avoiding maternal hyperglycaemia will prevent foetal hyperglycaemia, and hence reduce the chances of neonatal hypoglycaemia and foetal acidaemia. Infants who develop neonatal hypoglycaemia, have a 2-3.5 times higher risk of developing neuro-developmental impairment on follow-up at 18 months to 7 years of age. Keywords: Diabetes, Pregnancy, Labour Management, Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM), Caesarean section, Neonatal hypoglycaemia, neonatal hyperinsulinaemia. Pregnancy complicated by diabetes carries risks to both the mother and foetus, before, during and after delivery. Good glycaemic control before, during and after pregnancy and appropriate timing and mode of delivery is crucial to a healthy outcome for both. Timing of delivery should be discussed with the pregnant woman with Gestational, Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes especially in the last trimester, preferably in the antenatal clinic. It has to be weighed against the risk of prematurity, intrauterine death and excessive foetal growth, if pregnancy is allowed to continue. The neonate is at increa Continue reading >>

Induction At 38 Weeks Due To Type 2 Diabetes

Induction At 38 Weeks Due To Type 2 Diabetes

Induction at 38 weeks due to type 2 diabetes I'm being induced on Friday 9th Dec at 38+1due to type 2 diabetes. If anyone else has ever been induced early, whether for diabetes or not, and would you mind sharing your experiences with me? This is my first baby and I'm soooo nervous... I've just got this fear of a very lengthy, painful labour with this being my first and effectively being made to come out before he's ready! Am getting induced at 38+5 because of GD. I am so ready to deliver my baby now. Tired of worrying about what my sugar levels will do do to my baby. I want baby to be safe out of e and thrive now! Hi Hun I got induced @ 38+4 because ov sever SPD ....I had the pessare wot was left in 24hrs,with still no joy and then she gave me a sweep my 2nd one as had one few days b4 i went in)and that was it BAM labour began!!!! I was 3hrs 45mins in labour... It was a very positive labour....If u have got an iPod or mp3 there ways good to take in with u...good luck chick and keep us posted!! Hi I'm type 1 and was induced with lo at 36+4 due to high bp and protien . They tried 3 times but didn't work so had a section . I think maybe if I had been 38/39 weeks it may of worked . Hope the inductions go well xxx Hiya im from the 2nd trimester, hope u dont mind me popping in. i was induced on my first at 38 weeks due to type 1 diabetes. it worked first time, they gave me the pessary at 9.30pm..slept right thru and started having niggly pains at 8.30 the next morning. Gave birth at 7 minutes past 3 the same day. Hi hun. I was induced at 39 weeks due to pre eclampsia. I was so worried it would take for ever and end in a c section. For me it went ok though. I was given a pessary at 7am. By lunch time i was having mild contractions 6 minutes apart,i was having4cm and moved to Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Induction Of Labour – What You Should Know

Gestational Diabetes And Induction Of Labour – What You Should Know

Gestational Diabetes and Induction Gestational diabetes (GD) was once a relatively rare condition, occurring in about 4% of pregnancies. In recent years, the rate of women developing GD has doubled, and experts believe the incidence of the disease will keep increasing. Most women with GD are told by their care providers they will need to be induced before their due date, destroying their hopes for a natural and intervention free birth. Having GD can have a big impact on mothers’ and babies’ health during pregnancy, but does it really need to change how we give birth? What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition that only occurs during pregnancy. Certain pregnancy hormones interfere with your body’s ability to use insulin. Insulin converts blood sugar into usable energy, and if this doesn’t happen, blood sugar levels rise. Insulin resistance can cause high blood glucose levels and can eventually lead to gestational diabetes. Some women will have symptoms of GD, while others will have none. Many women can manage the condition without treatment other than dietary and exercise changes. Around 20% of women will need insulin injections. So for many women, well managed diabetes means they can still have healthy babies and normal births. Induction Of Labour Many care providers routinely recommend that women with gestational diabetes be induced around 38-39 weeks. The most common reasons given for induction at this gestation are to prevent stillbirth, and to prevent babies growing too large for vaginal birth. However, the evidence related to induction for women with GD comes from the review of one trial, which looked at 200 women who had either GD, Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. The World Health Organization states this evidence for induction before 41 w Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetic Induction And Labour Advice Please

Type 1 Diabetic Induction And Labour Advice Please

So I'm a type 1 diabetic, 36 weeks pregnant having my second baby. Had gestational diabetes with my first 4 years ago so everything was a bit different. I don't feel like I've had the best experience of antenatal care this time round and am feeling anxious about the labour and birth, mainly due to the fact that everything I've read and previous experience seems to be different from advice I'm being given by the doctors at my hospital. Last time with GD I was booked into hospital and induced at 38+6 and had dd bang on 39 weeks so I was in hospital when I went into labour. This time they want me to have a sweep at 38 weeks with my community midwife (despite never having met her) and have booked me in for an induction at 39 weeks. Everything I have read (including care pathway from my hospital) says I should deliver the baby by 38+6 and that my blood sugar levels need to be closely monitored during labour. I'm worried that if the sweep works and I go into labour at home 1) I won't realise until I'm almost giving birth (was 9cm dialatedwhen it became obvious in hospital last time) 2) I won't be able to manage my sugar levels effectively outside hospital. Also concerned my induction is booked for after the recommended 38+6. Thinking of refusing a sweep and asking for my induction to be brought forward by half a week. Any advice really gratefully received. xx You are well within your rights to refuse the sweep And as the NICE guidelines say you should be advised to deliver between 37+0 weeks and 38+6 weeks asking for the induction to be moved forward seems sensible I was advised with GD to come to hospital immediately if labour started before induction Pipedown - interesting. I was desperate for a sweep and to give birth naturally but wasn't allowed, had a failed induction a Continue reading >>

Complications Beyond 39 Weeks Pregnancy ? Type 1 Diabetic

Complications Beyond 39 Weeks Pregnancy ? Type 1 Diabetic

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community complications beyond 39 weeks pregnancy ? type 1 diabetic Discussion in ' Pregnancy ' started by aditi , Mar 31, 2014 . Has any gyn or endocrinologist ever told you that beyond 39 weeks of pregnancy chances of complications increase and it is advisable to go ahead with induced Labour or c section. I am a type 1 diabetic on the insulin pump. and am 21 weeks pregnant. My doc tells me that beyond 39 weeks with bAby inside is risky, I am keen on natural birth but can't seem to find much info about this. My main concern is if I am able to deal with my sugars what is the complication? Please do reply , really appreciate the support ! All the ladies here who have had babies did your gyn ever tell you that it is crucial to have the baby by 39th week or else there can be some major complications? My gyn and endocrinologist have told this to me. I am keen on the natural birth process and don't want any induced Labour unless extremely essential. Please do reply.. highly appreciate the support ! I have been told that will not go past 38 weeks. I'm sure this is because the placenta in diabetic mums usually stops working efficiently at this time which leads to a high risk of stillbirth. I'm sure I've read online about a mother who challenged this but she had to go to the hospital daily for a scan to check the effectiveness of the placenta. Personally it's not a risk I'm willing to take. Another problem with diabetic mums is babies size, I had to have my first at 37 weeks as she was get Continue reading >>

Pregnant Type 1 Being Induced Next Week: Can You Give Me Any Advice??

Pregnant Type 1 Being Induced Next Week: Can You Give Me Any Advice??

Pregnant TYPE 1 being induced next week: can you give me any advice?? Pregnant TYPE 1 being induced next week: can you give me any advice?? Well I've just come back from the doctors and he is inducing me next week. 15.01.09. My HBA1C is 6.4 and I've felt really healthy throughout the entire pregnancy. My sugars have been monitored every two days by my educator and they have been stable. Unfortunately, my ultrasound results show my baby's abdominal circumference to be at 40 weeks when I am 38 weeks and this is making the doctors decision to induce me next week. This is my first baby and I would love any advice for a successful vaginal delivery!!! If you have been induced with type 1 can you please tell me your story!!! How were your sugar levels, insulin doses, how long did it take, what pain medication did you use, any advise on natural pain relief??? etc etc D.D. Family T1 since May 2006 Metformin, Humalog and Lantus Can't help with advice on the birth as I wasn't diabetic when I had my kids,but would just like to wish you good luck and hope all goes well.Let us know when baby arrives. Last edited by Nixo; 1/09/09 at 05:18 AM. Reason: Typo Good luck first of all!! I had my girl in 2000 when I had diabetes for exactly 10 years. I was induced at 38 weeks, though babygirl wasn't that big yet, but my blood pressure was rising. First of all, have you discussed who's in charge of your diabetes. I did, however, once they put me on an insulin and separate glucose drip, that control was out of my hands, and that's terrible, I'd meassured a low BS, I told the nurse to lower the insulin drip (at one point I demanded they turn it off, because I was working so hard, I didn't really need the insulin), she said she had to go ask the, wait for it, OB-gyn...... who was of course worki Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Management From Preconception To The Postnatal Period

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Management From Preconception To The Postnatal Period

See other NICE guidance for NICE information for the public on care for women and their babies during labour (intrapartum care), induction of labour and caesarean section. You should be advised to have your baby in a hospital that has special facilities to care for sick babies 24 hours a day, in case these are needed. During your pregnancy (and especially in the last 3 months), your care team should explain about your options for giving birth. This should include information about the benefits and risks of having your labour induced compared with letting the pregnancy carry on, and of having a 'normal' (vaginal) birth compared with a caesarean section. This is especially important if you are having a large baby. If you have had a caesarean section before, you may still be able to have a vaginal birth this time. If you have certain health problems (such as being very overweight or having spinal nerve‑related problems such as sciatica), you may be advised to see an anaesthetist to talk about the best method of pain relief during the birth. Timing of the birth is important, because if your pregnancy carries on for too long this may increase the chance of problems for you and/or your baby. You should be advised to have your labour induced, or a caesarean section if this is the best option for you, during week 37 or week 38 of pregnancy. You may be advised to have your baby earlier than this if there are complications (such as high blood pressure or a slowing down of your baby's growth). You should be advised to have your labour induced, or a caesarean section if this is the best option for you, before 41 weeks of pregnancy if you have not had your baby by this time. You may be advised to have your baby earlier than this if there are complications (such as high blood press Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetic Being Induced Soon

Type 1 Diabetic Being Induced Soon

Are any of you type 1 Diabetics? I am and im being induced on the 8th. This is my first baby so I am very nervous! Anyone have any good tips on keeping calm and speeding things up? I'm type 2, and was induced 2 weeks early... Emily's birth ended in emergency c-section as she was getting distressed and I wasn't dilating quick enough, so from waters to birth was only 11hrs. I'd had 2 pessaries, and was getting really bad prostin pains, so midwife recommended a bath. I got back to my bed after the bath, felt a pop and then my waters broke without intervention! Was immediately moved to delivery suite, but in the 11hrs of labour, I only got to 4cm dilated. Because of the diabetes and induction, I ended up with a sliding scale drip, glucose, saline and syntocinon drip, baby was monitored with a clip on her head, and a catheter because I ended up with an epidural. Therefore I couldn't keep moving and hadn't been all that active, so I suggest you stay active as long as you can as it'll help things along... Hope that helps, happy to answer any other questions you might have... x How long did you stay in hospital for and how did you find the c section? I'm a type 1 and I was induced with DS1 5 years ago (my first baby). They induced me, then broke my waters, but by 5.30pm I still wasn't dilated enough. Baby then moved his head to the wrong position, my BP shot up and baby's heart rate dipped, so he was born via emergency c-section that evening. My advice would be .... take some magazines, snacks and drinks - it could be a long wait (but SOOOO worth it!). All the best hunny, I'm sure you'll be just fine. Had first pessary 11am on thursday, gave birth at 7.24am Friday, came home 10am Sunday. The c-section was fine. So much better than I thought it'd be. Done in an hour, up and abo Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Was Hard But Worth Every Moment

Pregnancy Was Hard But Worth Every Moment

Save for later My pregnancy was without doubt the hardest thing I've ever done, but worth every minute to have baby James safe in my arms. My control wasn't as good as it should have been when we started trying for a baby, and I hadn't seen a diabetes consultant for years. Instead I just attended check ups at my GP surgery. To be honest I didn't fully realise the risks involved with having a baby as a diabetic, although I did know that diabetics have a tendency to have larger babies. It was during one of these check ups that I mentioned that my husband and I wanted to start a family, and the practice nurse told me I should see a diabetes consultant urgently. At that point I was already a few days' pregnant - although I didn't know it yet. I was worried about miscarriage Thankfully we found that I was pregnant very early on, and I was seen by a consultant the following week. I'd read up on what effects diabetes can have on pregnancy and I felt quite stupid and irresponsible for not having taken better care of my sugar levels before. I wanted this baby so much but was really worried that I would have a miscarriage, or that the baby would have some kind of abnormality. I was determined to get my blood sugar levels to the lowest levels I could, and started testing at least 10 times a day. I was really struggling to get the balance right, giving myself corrective injections to bring the levels down, and having hypos every single day. Hormones during pregnancy interfere with blood sugar levels. That coupled with losing hypo awareness meant I had a lot of severe hypos and we had to call an ambulance out on a couple of occasions. Ten weeks into my pregnancy I had a hypo at work where I ended up fitting at my desk. I hadn't wanted to tell my colleagues that I was pregnant until Continue reading >>

C-sections Vs. Natural Birth In Diabetic Moms

C-sections Vs. Natural Birth In Diabetic Moms

Childbirth and diabetes were once considered mutually exclusive. Thankfully, those days are over. But aiming for a healthy baby — and an uncomplicated birth — when you're living with diabetes is still a very tall order. It can be scary. And no one really wants to have a C-section, right? (I sure didn't, x3). Today, D-author and fellow mother of three Amy Stockwell Mercer joins us once more for a special report on new research providing insight into the precise effects of the Big D during childbirth. Special to the 'Mine by Amy Stockwell Mercer The myth that women with diabetes can't have babies is almost extinct. Shelby's premature death in the movie Steel Magnolias has slowly been replaced by images of healthy, vibrant women like former Miss America Nicole Johnson and fellow D-blogger Kerri Morrone Sparling as they navigate diabetes, pregnancy and motherhood. We've come a long way in understanding the importance of prenatal care for women with diabetes and as a result, more women are having healthy babies than ever before. However, 45%-70% of these pregnancies result in cesarean births and until now, no one could explain why. Researchers at the University of Liverpool have recently discovered that women with diabetes have "impaired uterine contractility." That means that even if we push for hours, some of us may never succeed. This groundbreaking research is based on 2010 United Kingdom government statistics, which show a high induction of labor rate (39%) and a high C-section rate (67%) in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (compared to 21% of the general maternal population). "We need to think about the enormously high C-section rate rather than just accepting it," says co-author Dr. Susan Wray. "As scientists we asked the question, could it be that these wome Continue reading >>

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