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Type 1 Diabetes In Arabic

Use Of Hypoglycemic Plants By Tunisian Diabetic Patients - Sciencedirect

Use Of Hypoglycemic Plants By Tunisian Diabetic Patients - Sciencedirect

Volume 49, Issue 3 , September 2013, Pages 261-264 Use of hypoglycemic plants by Tunisian diabetic patients Author links open overlay panel Rym BenOthman Open Access funded by Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine The recourse to the herbal medicines in treating diabetes is frequent in Africa and especially in Tunisia. Its practice is transmitted orally and ritually from generation to generation. The objectives of this study are to determine the plants used, their methods of preparation, consumption and profile of patients who use them (habitat, profession, gender, age ). A questionnaire concerning the use of herbal medicines has been proposed to diabetic patients consulting in the National Institute of Nutrition of Tunis, on the output of the medical consultation of diabetes. Two hundred patients responded. 23% of patients were using herbal medicine. The main plants used are gum arabic (71.7%) fenugreek (28.3%) of white artemisia (21.7%) and marrube (10.9%). 28.3% of them have type 1 diabetes. The average duration of diabetes was 10.5 6.9 years, 72.4% of patients reduced their dosages of drug treatment because of the onset of hypoglycemia. The use of herbal medicines is frequent in the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes in Tunisia. This practice must however be based on the findings of scientific studies which are still scarce. The conditions of their utilization must be defined and users should be warned against potential side effects. Continue reading >>

Health Literacy Of Caregivers Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes: A Pilot Study On Impact On Glycaemic Control In An Arabic-speaking Population

Health Literacy Of Caregivers Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes: A Pilot Study On Impact On Glycaemic Control In An Arabic-speaking Population

Health Literacy of Caregivers of Children with Type 1 Diabetes: A Pilot Study on Impact on Glycaemic Control in an Arabic-Speaking Population Dalia Al-Abdulrazzaqa, Muneera Alhaddadb, Amani Al-fadhlia, Amna Alyousefb, Abeer Altararwab & Iman Albasarib Author affiliations View ePoster Download ePoster aKuwait University, Kuwait, Kuwait; bMinistry of Health, Kuwait, Kuwait Introduction: Health literacy has been linked to poorer diabetes control and outcomes. Caregivers with poor health literacy may fail to comprehend various elements of diabetes education leading to poor glycaemic control of their children. No studies to date had investigated the link between caregivers health literacy and their childrens glycaemic control in an Arabic-speaking population. Objectives and hypothesis: Our aim is to study the link between caregivers health literacy level and their childrens glycaemic control. We hypothesise that children of caregivers with poor health literacy will have poorer glycaemic control. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of a pilot of caregivers of children with type 1 diabetes in a Diabetes centre in Kuwait. Health literacy was assessed through administering the Arabic version of the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) tool. The childs glycaemic control was measured through the level of HbA1C within 3 months of the test administration. Results: Twenty caregivers were recruited with a median age of 37.0 years (IQR 35.5 41.5). The median age of their children was 8.9 years (IQR 6.2 11.1) with a BMI SDS of 0.6 (IQR 0.5 1.7). Median HbA1C was 8.6 (IQR 7.8 9.2) with children of caregivers with high likelihood of limited health literacy having poorer glycaemic control compared to those without (HbA1C 9.3, and 8.3 respectively, P=0.02). Conclusion: This study highlights the po Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Arab Nations

Diabetes And The Arab Nations

Have we reached a tipping point, and how do we silence the alarm? There is a crisis that is impacting health care in the Arab nations of the Middle East and in north and west Africa: six countries in this region are on the top-ten list worldwide in terms of diabetes prevalence. Comprising 22 countries with a total population of 350 million people, these nations constitute only about 5% of the total world population. Yet, nearly 20% of the people in Kuwait, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) are diabetic. Not to be forgotten is the likelihood that between 41% (Oman, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE) to 62% (Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, occupied Palestine, Sudan, and Tunisia) of the population is suffering from undiagnosed diabetes. Currently, nearly 10% of all adult deaths in Arab countries are related to the complications of diabetes. This disproportionate prevalence of diabetes within the Arab nations undoubtedly has long-term health implications that will manifest in several ways unless social norms regarding diet and exercise change, along with a serious effort to reconsider government priorities. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes outweighs type 1 diabetes mellitus by roughly 10:1. Among the many causes of type 2diabetes are the following: the inability of peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle to respond to insulin (insulin resistance), impaired secretion of insulin from pancreatic cells, and eventually beta cell exhaustion and early programmed cell death of betacells. A discussion of type 2 diabetes invariably includes an understanding of the relationship between obesity and diabetes and a realization that fat deposits (particularly of visceral fat in the gut region and epicardial fat surrounding the heart) predispose patients to diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Arab World: A Soaring Epidemic

Diabetes In The Arab World: A Soaring Epidemic

Diabetes in the Arab world: A soaring epidemic Published online 14 November 2014 The rapid change of lifestyle in the Middle East over the past few decades have led to soaring rates of diabetes across the whole region. Nature Middle East/Infograph by Amr Rahma Enlarge image With the rapid economic growth during the past few decades across many countries in the Middle East came many blessings and a fewalbeit dangerous side effects. The wide infrastructure development, rapid urbanization. increased life expectancy and reduced infant morality also translated into lifestyle changes that included reduced physical activity, increased obesity, increased smoking and the spread of low-nutrition fast food. These in turn led to soaring rates of diabetes across most countries in the region, especially the Gulf states. With nearly 35 million people diagnosed with the disease, the Middle East and North Africa have the highest prevalence level in the world, with 1 in every 10 people living with the disease. Healthcare expenditure has failed to keep up with the rapid increase in diabetes. In 2013, all the countries in the region spent US$13.5 billion on diabetes healthcare, just 2.5% of global spending on the disease. Egypt, the most populous county in the world and the one with the highest number of cases, spent a mere US$176 per person with diabetes. While the expenditure on diabetes is set to double by 2035, it will hardly be enough to halt or slow the spread epidemic. Millions of people with diabetes remain undiagnosed, and late diagnosis is still widespread in most countries, which burdens the healthcare system further due to the disease's complications. With diabetes killing more than 10% of all adults in the region, and nearly half of these under 60, the cost to society and dev Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Arabic - English-arabic Dictionary - Glosbe

Type 1 Diabetes In Arabic - English-arabic Dictionary - Glosbe

translation and definition "type 1 diabetes", English-Arabic Dictionary online en People with type 1 diabetes require insulin, people with type 2 diabetes can be treated with oral medication, but may also require insulin; ar 1 2 en Diabetes with the mortality rate of 42.4 per 100,000 inhabitants, with the incidence rate for type 1 diabetes for persons aged up to 29 is 10.7 per 100,000 inhabitants and the incidence rate for type 2 diabetes is 209.6 per 100,000 inhabitants ar 42.4 000 100 29 10.7 000 100 209.6 000 100 en Consequently, the occurrence of type 2 diabetes has increased since the past decades and type 1 diabetes since the 1950s. ar 2 1 . en Henry Watkins is also a type 1 diabetic. ar ( ) en Stem cells and immature cells are already being used to treat blood cancers,_to repair skin and the cornea of the eye. Trials are underway for the use of_stem cells to help repair damaged hearts and to prevent type 1 diabetes._Insulin-producing tissue can ar . 1. en The Tribunal rejected the authors argument in this regard, pointing out that one other SDM also had type 1 diabetes, but continued in her role. ar . en and diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic in full-blown ketoacidosis. ar . en 3 People with type 1 diabetes can live without insulin. ar 3 1 ar en Genetic makeup may also be implicated, for Type 1 diabetes often runs in families, and it is most common among Caucasians. ar . . en In Type 1 diabetes, a persons immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. ar . en * Karen, who has Type 1 diabetes, found that exercise increases the efficiency of the insulin she injects. ar * . en Diabetes education activities include programmes and workshops for atrisk youth with type 1 diabetes in: 2007: Ecuador (100), Bermuda (15) 2008: Bolivia (Plurinational St Continue reading >>

Translation And Meaning Of Diabetes In English Arabic Terms Dictionary

Translation And Meaning Of Diabetes In English Arabic Terms Dictionary

Contextual Example: diabetes in a translated text () As of May , of practice units have a diabetes registry fully in place and in use 2 . () The most pressing one is that we want to understand how some differences make some people susceptible to one disease type 2 diabetes , for example and other differences make people more susceptible to heart disease , or stroke , or autism and so on . , , . () And those have been linked then with the rather alarming , growing rates of obesity , shown in these maps here , and that obesity has also been triggering great increases in heart disease and diabetes to the point where a child born today has a oneinthree chance of developing diabetes . . () () My friend Red Maxwell has spent the last 10 years fighting against juvenile diabetes . () This is a campaign from the American Diabetes Association . 1 2 . () There's a second big project , recently funded by the Wellcome Trust in this country , involving very large studies thousands of individuals , with each of eight different diseases , common diseases like type 1 and type 2 diabetes , and coronary heart disease , bipolar disease and so on to try and understand the genetics . Continue reading >>

Contribution Of Type 2 Diabetes Associated Loci In The Arabic Population From Tunisia: A Case-control Study

Contribution Of Type 2 Diabetes Associated Loci In The Arabic Population From Tunisia: A Case-control Study

Contribution of type 2 diabetes associated loci in the Arabic population from Tunisia: a case-control study Ezzidi et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2009 Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have both reproducibly identified several common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that confer type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in European populations. Our aim was to evaluate the contribution to T2D of five of these established T2D-associated loci in the Arabic population from Tunisia. A case-control design comprising 884 type 2 diabetic patients and 513 control subjects living in the East-Center of Tunisia was used to analyze the contribution to T2D of the following SNPs: E23K in KCNJ11/Kir6.2, K121Q in ENPP1, the -30G/A variant in the pancreatic -cell specific promoter of Glucokinase, rs7903146 in TCF7L2 encoding transcription factor 7-like2, and rs7923837 in HHEX encoding the homeobox, hematopoietically expressed transcription factor. TCF7L2-rs7903146 T allele increased susceptibility to T2D (OR = 1.25 [1.061.47], P = 0.006) in our study population. This risk was 56% higher among subjects carrying the TT genotype in comparison to those carrying the CC genotype (OR = 1.56 [1.132.16], P = 0.002). No allelic or genotypic association with T2D was detected for the other studied polymorphisms. In the Tunisian population, TCF7L2-rs7903146 T allele confers an increased risk of developing T2D as previously reported in the European population and many other ethnic groups. In contrast, none of the other tested SNPs that influence T2D risk in the European population was associated with T2D in the Tunisian Arabic population. An insufficient power to detect minor allelic contributions or genetic heterogeneity of T2D between different ethnic groups can explain these findings. A Continue reading >>

Pen: Practice-based Evidence In Nutrition

Pen: Practice-based Evidence In Nutrition

A 1.5 minute video for consumers and professionals from Kidney Heath Australia posted on YouTube explaining the pathophysiology of diabetes nephropathy. National Diabetes Services Scheme - Gestational Diabetes Client Resources Resources for women with gestational diabetes from the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), an initiative of the Australia Government. Resources include two booklets: Caring For Yourself and Your Baby and Life After Gestational Diabetes, available in a variety of languages including English, Chinese (simplified and traditional), Turkish, Arabic and Vietnamese; and a DVD called Understanding Gestational Diabetes for women who first language, available in 11 languages. Booklets, e-books and applications from the Sydney Diabetes Clinical Research Unit on type 1 and type 2 diabetes; carbohydrate counting and gestational diabetes. Available for purchase. A variety of health education topics translated in Arabic by the Health Information Translations. Nutrition related topics include allergies, lowering sodium, cholesterol, diabetes and low blood sugar, gastroparesis, osteoporosis, sore mouth with cancer treatment. Pictorial consumer handout from the Australian Diabetes Council providing information on healthy eating for diabetes. Available in English, Greek, Italian, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese and Arabic. Diabetes What you Need to Know (Australian Diabetes Council) Comprehensive consumer handout from the Australian Diabetes Council on type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. Available in the English, French, Greek, Italian, Maltese, Russian, Turkish, Spanish, Chinese, Filipino, Vietnamese, Dinka, Swahili, Hindi, Tamil, Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Arabic, Dari and Farsi. Information from Diabetes Australia for individuals with diabetes deciding whet Continue reading >>

Arabic

Arabic

Summary: It is important to look after diabetes for long-term health. Diabetes is a condition which, over time, may cause damage to the bodys organs, blood vessels and nerves. If diabetes is well managed and general health is taken care of, the risk of diabetes-related complications is reduced. This fact sheet provides information on diabetes-related complications including the most common diabetes-related complications and tips to maintain good health. Summary: This fact sheet provides general information and facts about type 1 and 2 diabetes, their common symptoms, causes and treatment. It also covers gestational diabetes. It includes frequently asked questions about diabetes and information about diabetes and travelling, diabetes and driving and diabetes complications and driving. Summary: Type 1 diabetes affects about 10-15% of all people living with diabetes. It occurs when the pancreas cant produce insulin. This happens because the cells that make the insulin (beta cells) have been destroyed by the bodys own immune system. Summary: Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. It affects 80-90% of all people living with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas cant make enough insulin and the bodys cells cant respond properly to the insulin that is made. This leads to high blood glucose levels. Summary: Basic information on type 2 Diabetes including symptoms and prevention This resource has been reviewed in the last 3 years and complies with the Health Translation Directory editorial guidelines and collection policy. The Health Translations Directory is always improving The Centre for Culture, Ethnicity and Health has been contracted to manage and improve Health Translations. We are regularly reviewing our collection and improving your experience Continue reading >>

Diabetes Epidemic Sweeping The Arab World

Diabetes Epidemic Sweeping The Arab World

Diabetes epidemic sweeping the Arab world Number of Hits and Downloads for This Article Apr 25, 2016 (publication date) through Sep 5, 2018 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 7901 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 501, Pleasanton, CA 94588, USA Copyright The Author(s) 2016. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. World J Diabetes.Apr 25, 2016;7(8): 165-174 Published online Apr 25, 2016.doi: 10.4239/wjd.v7.i8.165 Diabetes epidemic sweeping the Arab world Bisher Abuyassin, Ismail Laher, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada Author contributions: Abuyassin B conducted the literature search and prepared the manuscript; Laher I reviewed and edited the manuscript. Conflict-of-interest statement: Authors have no financial conflicts of interest related to this work. Open-Access: This article is an open-access article which was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: Correspondence to: Dr. Ismail Laher, PhD, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, 2176 Health Science Mall, Medical Block C, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. The prevalence of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has increased dramatically during the last 2 decades, a fact driven by the increased prevalence of obesity, the primary risk factor for T2DM. The figures for diabetes in the Arab world ar Continue reading >>

Multilingual - Diabetes Queensland

Multilingual - Diabetes Queensland

Diabetes Queensland values and respects the many diversecultural, language and faith groups, with distinct identities, thatenrich and enhance the Queensland community. As part of our mission to improve the lives of all Queenslandersaffected by all types of diabetes and those at risk, DiabetesQueensland is dedicated to empowering communities and individualsfrom culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds to prevent,understand and manage diabetes. To improve access to diabetes information, there are a number oftranslated and culturally tailored resources available. If you require further assistance or advice regardingcontent, please feel free to contact us here at Diabetes Queenslandon 1300 136 588. The National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) dedicatedmulticultural website, the Multicultural Diabetes Portal www.multiculturalportal.ndss.com.auhasa range of factsheets and brochures in different languages,containing expert advice about managing diabetes and living well.All material is regularly checked to ensure you have the latestinformation. Continue reading >>

Mindfulness-based Arabic Guided Self-help For Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Mindfulness-based Arabic Guided Self-help For Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Mindfulness-based Arabic Guided Self-help for Parents of Children With Type 1 Diabetes The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03358394 Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting Information provided by (Responsible Party): Top of Page Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Kuwait ranks as the third country worldwide for the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) with an incidence of 37.10 per 100,000 children. A systematic review revealed that anxiety and depression are common in parents of children with T1D . Despite the high incidence rate, only one study to date has examined the psychological impact of diabetes on parents of children with T1D in Kuwait. It was found that 50.8% of parents had elevated levels of anxiety and 46.7% had elevated levels of depression. Recent research shows that mindfulness is associated with a range of positive outcomes as well as decreased psychological and emotional distress. The earlier A doctor of philosophy (PhD) study found that mindfulness explained large amount of variance in anxiety and depression in a sample of parents of children with T1D. Mindfulness is defined as "paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally". The model of mindful parenting can be taught and provided as an intervention to improve psychological outcomes in parents of children with long term he Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus In Arabic-speaking Countries

Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus In Arabic-speaking Countries

Type II Diabetes Mellitus in Arabic-Speaking Countries We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Type II Diabetes Mellitus in Arabic-Speaking Countries The global epidemic of diabetes has not spared the Arabic-speaking countries, which have some of the highest prevalence of type II diabetes. This is particularly true of the Arab Gulf, a conglomerate of high income, oil-producing countries where prevalence rates are the highest. The prevalence rates among adults of the Arabic speaking countries as a whole range between 4%21%, with the lowest being in Somalia and the highest in Kuwait. As economic growth has accelerated, so has the movement of the populations to urban centers where people are more likely to adopt lifestyles that embrace increased high-calorie food consumption and sedentary lifestyles. These factors likely contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the Arabic speaking countries. Diabetes mellitus, long considered a disease of minor significance to world health, is now considered one of the main threats to human health in this century. The global epidemic of people with type II diabetes is largely due to population growth, aging, urbanization, and the scourge of obesity and physical inactivity. The total number of people worldwide with type II diabetes was expected to increase from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030 [ 1 ]. Unfortunately, the prevalence worldwide already reached 3 Continue reading >>

Gum Arabic And Diabetes

Gum Arabic And Diabetes

Diabetes is a high blood glucose level. It usually occurs for three main reasons: "Autoimmune diabetes": when the body is unable to produce insulin completely. In this case, the immune system attacks and destroys beta cells responsible for the production of insulin (hormone regulating the blood sugar).Autoimmune diabetes usually begins in childhood and is often genetic or congenital to the pancreas. The second type of diabetes occurs when the body produces the insulin hormone in small amount that does not respond to the daily requirements of the body. It is usually associated with the factor of inheritance, increaseweight and age. The third type is gestational diabetes that accompanies many women during pregnancy. The symptoms of diabetes vary from one type to another:frequent urination, severe and persistent fatigue, frequent eatingwith loosing weight. It is among the lifelong diseases (except gestational diabetes). Prevention is better than treatment of course. But if diabetes occurs, it requires immediate treatment to prevent causing other diseases such as sexual dysfunction., eye diseases, diabetic foot, kidney and other diseases that resulting from the negligence of the diabetic treatment. Arab Sudanese gum is one of the natural plantsfor the prevention of diabetes. Rich in therapeutic and preventive properties, gum arabic also helps in the diabetes treatment process. Benefits of Sudanese gum arabic for diabetes Gum Arabic helps to adjust the level of blood sugar. Itprovides the body's requirements of vitamins and minerals needed by the diabetic. Gum Arabic stimulates the body to produce insulin in sufficient quantity. It also reduces body's resistance to insulin. Gum stimulates the pancreas secretion and prevents its disturbance. It helps to convert the sugar sto Continue reading >>

Who Emro | Diabetes | Health Topics

Who Emro | Diabetes | Health Topics

Diabetes is one of the 4 major types of noncommunicable diseases (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases). It is a chronic condition that occurs when the body either does not produce enough insulin or cannot effectively use the insulin it does produce. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the blood sugar (glucose) formed from the food consumed by a person. Diabetes therefore results in raised blood sugar levels which, if not controlled, over time lead to serious damage to many of the body's systems. There are 2 major forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by deficient insulin production and requires daily administration of insulin. Symptoms may occur suddenly and include extreme thirst, constant hunger, weight loss, excessive urination, blurred vision and fatigue. Type 2 diabetes results from the bodys inability to effectively use its insulin. 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Symptoms may be similar to those of type 1 diabetes, but are often less marked. As a result, the condition may be diagnosed several years after onset, after complications have already developed. Type 2 diabetes is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity. Reduction of the global and regional burden of diabetes requires a 2-pronged approach: interventions to prevent diabetes and interventions to manage people who have already developed the condition in order to reduce progression. Actions are needed both by governments and by people themselves, and at population level and individual health care level. Continue reading >>

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