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Type 1 Diabetes Handout For Teachers

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (previously called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) is usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults, but it can develop at any age. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas isn’t making insulin or is making very little. Insulin is a hormone that enables blood sugar to enter the cells in your body where it can be used for energy. Without insulin, blood sugar can’t get into cells and builds up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar is damaging to the body and causes many of the symptoms and complications of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2—about 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes, but it can be managed by following your doctor’s recommendations for living a healthy lifestyle, controlling your blood sugar, getting regular health checkups, and getting diabetes self-management education. Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills, or clamminess Irritability or impatience Dizziness and difficulty concentrating Hunger or nausea Blurred vision Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness If your child has type 1 diabetes, you’ll be involved in diabetes care on a day-to-day basis, from serving healthy foods to giving insulin injections to watching for and treating hypoglycemia (low blood sugar; see below). You’ll also need to stay in close contact with your child’s health care team; they will help you understand the treatment plan and how to help your child stay healthy. Much of the information that follows applies to children as well as adults, and you can also click here for comprehensive information about managing your child’s type 1 diabetes. Causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistak Continue reading >>

Parent And Family Toolkit

Parent And Family Toolkit

Families Frequently Asked Questions : Perhaps you have questions and are not sure where to go for answers. This tool is a great start when you are confronted with a new diabetes hurdle. Before You Begin a New School Year First School Meeting : Start the new school year on the right foot by using these suggestions on how to ease your childs transition. This form also includes information on issues to consider and discuss with teachers, administration, and the school nurse as well as helpful tips to simplify the process. 4 Steps to Help Kids With Diabetes at School : This article from the Diabetes Forecast magazine provides parents with tips for preparing for school. Files for the Child's Healthcare Provider and School Nurse Healthcare Provider Orders-Injections: Orders to be completed by healthcare provider for student receiving insulin by injection and/or oral medications. Healthcare Provider Orders - Pump: Orders to be completed by healthcare provider for student receiving insulin by pump. Glucagon Training Form : This form serves as a training record for the documentation of parent/guardian designation to administer emergency glucagon by volunteer adults, the volunteer adults acceptance of that designation, and the medical providers training of those adults. Glucagon Information Sheet : This sheet explains what glucagon is, when it is given, and clear instructions for administering glucagon. Legal Protections, Rights, and Responsibilities Federal laws , such asThe Americans with Disabilities Act, The Individuals with Disabilities with Education Act (IDEA), The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA),and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, provide important legal protections for the rights of students with diabetes. Section 504 Plan Sample Provisions : This file co Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes At School

Managing Type 1 Diabetes At School

Patient Guide to Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes Written by Amy Hess-Fischl MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE Type 1 diabetes requires constant attentionit doesn't go away during school hours. That's why it's essential that school staff, including teachers, bus drivers, and school health personnel, understand the needs of their students with type 1 diabetes to ensure that school is a safe and healthy environment. More than 13,000 young people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year.1 Because the disease is so common in young children, it's important that schools have at least some staff members who have a basic understanding of type 1 diabetes. Having a school worker on hand who knows how to check blood glucose, inject insulin, and choose an appropriate snack when blood glucose levels are low provides an enormous amount of security to parents. Children with type 1 diabetes rely on both parents and school officials to ensure that their condition is managed at school. That's a big responsibility for parents and school workers, but fortunately, there are resources available to help make your child's school conducive to managing type 1 diabetes. For parents, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) offer sample school type 1 diabetes care forms that alert the school to your child's condition and provide instructions on how the school should respond in an emergency situation. For school staff, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Helping the Student with Type 1 Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel provides a comprehensive overview of important considerations for schools that have students with type 1 diabetes. Laws Protecting Your Child with Type 1 Diabetes As a Continue reading >>

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

13 Things All Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by JDRF Millions of people around the world live with type 1 diabetes (T1D), a life-threatening autoimmune disease that strikes both children and adults. JDRF is the leading global organization funding research that will one day create a world without T1D. By joining JDRF Kids Walk, not only can your students make a difference for those living with T1D, but it’s fun and easy for everyone involved! Find out how your school can help today. As an educator, you provide an extremely important set of eyes and ears for students. Since you see them throughout the day, you notice when things are different, off or just not quite right. This is incredibly helpful and comforting to parents because teachers often uncover important and even life-changing discoveries. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is one of those diseases that teachers can often see signs of in the classroom, so it’s important to know what to look for. Take a look at some of these warning signs, and also get tips about how to accommodate a child with T1D in your classroom. 1. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It is not related to lifestyle, nor is it the result of anything the child (or family) did or did not do. Normally, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that helps the body use glucose (“blood sugar”) for energy. In people who have T1D, the body’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells and the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, so blood sugar levels can rise if unchecked. A person with T1D needs insulin injections or infusions to live. 2. Excessive urination, thirst and hunger are all symptoms of T1D. Because teachers spend so much time with kids, they may be among the first to notice symptoms that could be linked to diabetes. A child who is asking to use the bath Continue reading >>

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | Parent & Family Files

Colorado Kids With Diabetes | Parent & Family Files

# 700 Families Frequently Asked Questions 2014 :Perhaps you have questions and are not sure where to go for answers. This tool is a great start when your confronted with a new diabetes hurdle. #701 Before You Begin a New School Year First School Meeting :Start the new school year on the right foot by using these suggestions on how to ease your childs transition. This form also includes information on issues to consider and discuss with teachers, administration, and the school nurse as well as helpful tips to simplify the process. 4 Steps to Help Kids With Diabetes at School: Forecast Diabetes Magazine Standards of Care for Diabetes Management in the School Setting 2017 :These standards of care for students with Type 1 Diabetes are to be usedin conjunctionwith the Colorado Provider Orders & Individualized Health Plans. The students health care provider may indicate exceptions to these standards on the students individual orders. These Standards were originally developed in 2013 by theColorado Kids with Diabetes Care and Prevention Collaborativeof local health care providers, nurses and stakeholders and are revised annually. Guidelines of Insulin Management :Practical guidelines for insulin management in the school setting. Collaborative Guidelines for Dexcom G5 Non-Adjunctive Dosing :These guidelines are to be used if parents have requested to use the Dexcom G5 (only) for Non-Adjunctive Insulin dosing. NOTE: The Barbara Davis Center will provide its own computer generated orders which align with the orders on this website.Additional school or district specific medication forms are unnecessary unless they contain additional information not specified here for this students diabetes care. 201-Provider Orders Injections 2014 :Orders to be completed by healthcare provider fo Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Live a healthy life with Type 1 Diabetes. Choose exercise guidelines and self-management solutions that are specific for your diabetes treatment. Using this Website This website can help you learn about, and live a healthy life with type 1 diabetes. It is divided into 3 main sections: The modules can be read in any order. However, if you are newly diagnosed, it is best to start at the beginning in Understanding Diabetes, and work your way through the material. Below you will find a guide to each module. As you will see, depending upon your individual therapy, you can choose exercise guidelines and self-management sections that are specific for your diabetes treatment. Additionally, throughout the program, Self-assessment quizzes are available to help you monitor your progress, and how much you are learning. The Modules are: Additional modules: Continue reading >>

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1d

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1d

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1D A parent crafts a note every teacher should have in their inbox if they have a student with Type 1 diabetes. Its that time of year back to school! New notebooks, new clothes, new bookbag, and new teachers that will need a crash course in diabetes education. When my son was first diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, we were two weeks into 4th grade. We were lucky in that his teacher has a child that had been diagnosed a year earlier with T1D. That first year was so much easier because she just understood. She even knew to stock up her desk drawer with juice boxes before I had a clue! But if the stars dont align so perfectly for you with your childs new teacher, here are 8 essential tips you can give to get your childs teacher up to speed on Type 1 diabetes. If you feel shy talking to them about this, you can just forward them this article: 1. Things change quickly. Blood sugars have a mind of their own and what my childs levels were at 8:15 a.m. have no bearing on his/her blood sugar levels five minutes later. Children can go high or low based on a zillion different factors that scientists cant quantify. 2. Blood glucose numbers are not bad and they are not good; they just are. A child is at his/her best and in no danger when in a target blood sugar range. The numbers simply provide information that can be acted upon. If a childs blood glucose levels go high, the child needs to have a bolus shot of insulin and to drink water. If they go low, the child needs to be treated with the right food and re-checked. In the target range let it be. 3. My childs body works differently. He or she will snack, drink, and use the bathroom more often than average based on blood sugar levels. Please allow them the space for that flexibility. 4 Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Schools - Information For Teachers & Staff

Diabetes In Schools - Information For Teachers & Staff

Diabetes in schools - information for teachers & staff Diabetes in schools - information for teachers & staff This page is an overview of what teachers and staff should know about diabetes with links to further support and resources If you have a child with Type 1 diabetes in your care at school, youll know that theres a lot to think about. Or if a child with Type 1 diabetes is joining your school, there will be lots of things to put in place to ensure the child is cared for correctly. Over the past two years weve been busy supporting schools to put the right care in place for children with diabetes through our Type 1 diabetes: Make the grade campaign . Weve developed lots of easy to follow, free resources to help schools know what to do and how to do it. On this page you will find information on: Watch this video from the Safe in School campaign to hear from children, staff and parents about what good care involves. Students with Type 1 diabetes moving class in the same school Talk about if their childs classes are changing, or the staff responsible for caring for them at school. Let them know about any planned trips. And consider if there are any other changes that might affect them, such as changes to the school curriculum, timing of lunch and breaks or storage of medication and equipment. Ask parents if any aspects of the students care might change, or if there is any particular area they would like the schools help on, e.g. taking responsibility for certain aspects of care as the student grows up Arrange training for new carers, involve the diabetes nurse and parents in this. Allow time for new carers to work with current carers so that they build up their confidence and the student feels comfortable with them. Update the students individual healthcare plan if nec Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Information For Teachers And Child-care Providers

Children With Diabetes - Information For Teachers And Child-care Providers

Information for Teachers and Child-Care Providers Teachers and child-care providers are likely to have a child with type 1 diabetes in their care at some point in their career. This page provides basic information about diabetes, offer suggestions for how to care for children with diabetes, and refers you to other sources of information. Type 1 diabetes, previously called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an autoimmune disease in which the body destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is required by the body to use glucose, the simple sugar into which foods are broken down by our digestive system. Without insulin, the body starves to death. It's important to note that everyone is insulin-dependent. People without diabetes make insulin in their pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes must inject insulin. Diabetes is not contagious. And though there is no cure, diabetes can be managed with insulin injections, blood sugar monitoring, proper diet and exercise. Children with diabetes face two problems that teachers need to understand: hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. You should learn the symptoms and how to treat each. Hypoglycemia , or low blood sugar, occurs when the blood sugar level is too low, due to too much insulin, too little food, or too much exercise. Children with low blood sugar sometimes behave erratically or act sleepy, and are often very hungry and shaky. Low blood sugar must be treated immediately by giving the child foods with simple sugars, such as glucose tablets, fruit juice or regular (NOT diet) soda. If you suspect that a child has low blood sugar, do not leave the child unattended because the child can lose consciousness. Never send a child who you suspect has a low blood sugar to the nurse or clinic alone. Hypergl Continue reading >>

Tips To Help Teachers Keep Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

Tips To Help Teachers Keep Kids With Diabetes Safe At School

* TALKING POINTS SCHOOL GROUP: Welcome the group. Thank them for taking time out of day to learn more about diabetes. Their attendance means they are definitely interested and committed to providing an optimal, supportive environment for their students with diabetes. Tell a personal story of caring for a child with diabetes that makes this session so important. Nearly 21 million adults and children in the U.S. have diabetes. This includes <#> children at About Diabetes * TALKING POINTS Engage the audience in conversation. Ask them if they know anyone with diabetes? Encourage 1-2 people to share their personal link. Describe your personal link, if you have one. Transition to: “Let me tell you a little bit more about diabetes…†About Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic illness in which the body does not produce insulin (type 1) or does not produce enough insulin or properly use it (type 2). Insulin is vital for everyday life because it converts sugar, starches or other food into energy. Diabetes is the sixth deadliest disease in the U.S. Diabetes has no cure. * TALKING POINTS Define diabetes and the seriousness of this disease. About Diabetes Type 1 diabetes Occurs when the pancreas does not produce insulin Requires multiple doses of insulin every day – via shots or an insulin pump Accounts for 5 to 10% of all cases of diabetes and is the most prevalent type of diabetes among children and adolescents Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented. * TALKING POINTS Ask the audience if they have a student with type 1 diabetes? Ask how many have more than one? Describe type 1 diabetes. Stress that type 1 diabetes can not be prevented. Type 2 diabetes Occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or use insulin prop Continue reading >>

Information For Teachers

Information For Teachers

The increasing prevalence of diabetes in younger people means that as a teacher it is highly likely you will have a student with diabetes in your class at sometime in your career. A student with diabetes can do everything their peers do but, because of their diabetes, they may need: to eat at additional times, especially with sport special provisions for privacy if testing blood glucose levels and injecting insulin at school is necessary. Schools have a legal responsibility to provide: When the school knows that certain students have diabetes, staff (including relief staff) need to know enough about diabetes to ensure the safety of those students (especially in regard to hypoglycaemia and safety in sport). Parents/guardians have a responsibility to advise the school of their childs medical condition and the particular requirements for the management of their childs diabetes. For children with special requirements, a written individual management plan incorporating medical recommendations should be developed with the school in collaboration with the parents/guardians and doctor. This should be attached to the students records. Contact your state or territory diabetes office for information about strategies to support children living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in your local area. For more resources view the ' School ' page where you can find links to Mastering Diabetes, a special resource to help support children at school and our Diabetes in Schools Report. Continue reading >>

171_teaching Diabetes: Module 01

171_teaching Diabetes: Module 01

Have you ever tried to introduce diabetes to a newly diagnosed patient and found yourself at a loss? Do you stumble trying to explain the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Are you frustrated by the disconnect between your own understanding of diabetes and your ability to explain it? You are not alone! Diabetes educators specialize in the management of diabetes and effectively teaching it to patients. As a healthcare professional you have learned the basics of diabetes mellitus, but not how to teach a patient who lives with it. Simplifying pathophysiology, medication usage, blood glucose monitoring, meal planning, and overall management of the disease is daunting but it is a skill you can acquire with practice. Teaching patients to take their prescribed medications correctly may be as important as the medication itself because, without a good understanding, patients may take it incorrectly, with poor outcomes. Studies confirm positive behavioral and economic outcomes of outpatient diabetes education programs on self-care (Brown, 1990). Patients with diabetes who have received diabetes education have better A1C glycosylated hemoglobin levels, fewer emergency department (ED) visits, and better overall health compared to those with diabetes who never received education. Clearly diabetes education matters. With over 29.1 million Americans9.3% of the United States populationdiagnosed with diabetes and another 86 million with prediabetes, there are a lot of people needing diabetes education (ADA, 2014). Diabetes is steadily increasing in incidence and prevalence in the United States and remains the seventh leading or contributing cause of death; further, it represents almost 26% of adults age 65 and older, which is 1 out of every 4 elders. Diabetes in youth age 2 Continue reading >>

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes 10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes Children will not outgrow type 1 diabetes: With type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin have been destroyed. People with type 1 diabetes will always have to take insulin injections (until there is a cure). Changes in lifestyle or diet will not improve type 1 diabetes. Insulin is not a cure: But it is the only treatment. Without insulin, people with type 1 diabetes would die. It takes a lot of work to manage diabetes: Children with type 1 diabetes usually look healthy. Thats because they and their families are working hard to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. They do this by checking levels frequently, and acting quickly when neededsuch as adding insulin to account for a special treat, or having a snack because of extra physical activity. Technology is helpful, but it doesnt work on its own: Some students wear insulin pumps to deliver insulin. A pump is another way to deliver insulin, and whether or not to use a pump is an individual choice. Other students wear continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), which take blood sugar readings every few minutes. But none of these devices works on its own. People still have to carefully monitor blood sugar, food intake, and activity, and make decisions about how much insulin to give and when. Blood sugar levels can change quickly: Its important to check blood sugar often, because there are many factors that can cause it to change from minute to minute. Low blood sugar needs immediate attention: If a student feels low, or you suspect a student is low, act right away. Do not leave the student alone. Check blood sugar, and give fast-acting sugar as needed. High blood sugar means extra trips to t Continue reading >>

A Teacher’s Guide To Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

A Teacher’s Guide To Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is a part of our library of resources for Elementary/Primary School. Read more on test taking, diabetic alert dogs, class presentations and creating a school treatment plan. Being a teacher comes with the responsibility of taking care of 20-30 children on a daily basis. In your career, you may have a student with Type 1 diabetes in your class. Although you may feel overwhelmed about what to expect, there is no need! This guide will make you aware of the conditions of a child with T1D, which will give you a better understanding of how to keep him or her healthy and safe at school. What is Type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s own immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in their pancreas. People with Type 1 are insulin-dependent for life, and must manually give themselves insulin through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. They must carefully balance insulin, food, exercise, and other factors in order to prevent or minimize serious short and long-term complications due to out of range blood sugar levels. If you have not heard much about Type 1, here are some other fast facts – T1D is not caused by a lack of exercise or eating too much sugar T1D is not contagious There is no cure for T1D at the present moment Although T1D has also been called “juvenile diabetes,” T1D affects both children and adults How can I help? It is important to remember that children with T1D can participate in all of the same activities as other kids, such as play sports and join activities. They can also eat sweets and any other type of food/drink, as long as they are giving themselves the appropriate amount of insulin to cover the meal. Some foods affect blood sugar levels differently than others. Read Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults but can appear at any age. Symptoms may include Being very thirsty Urinating often Feeling very hungry or tired Losing weight without trying Having sores that heal slowly Having dry, itchy skin Losing the feeling in your feet or having tingling in your feet Having blurry eyesight A blood test can show if you have diabetes. If you do, you will need to take insulin for the rest of your life. A blood test called the A1C can check to see how well you are managing your diabetes. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

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