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Type 1 Diabetes Foods To Avoid List

Foods To Avoid To Help Prevent Diabetes

Foods To Avoid To Help Prevent Diabetes

We’ve known that being overweight and obese are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes, but, until recently, not much attention has been paid to the role of specific foods. I discuss this issue in my video, Why Is Meat a Risk Factor for Diabetes? A 2013 meta-analysis of all the cohorts looking at the connection between meat and diabetes found a significantly higher risk associated with total meat consumption––especially consumption of processed meat, particularly poultry. But why? There’s a whole list of potential culprits in meat: saturated fat, animal fat, trans fats naturally found in meat, cholesterol, or animal protein. It could be the heme iron found in meat, which can lead to free radicals and iron-induced oxidative stress that may lead to chronic inflammation and type 2 diabetes, or advanced glycation end (AGE) products, which promote oxidative stress and inflammation. Food analyses show that the highest levels of these so-called glycotoxins are found in meat—particularly roasted, fried, or broiled meat, though any foods from animal sources (and even high fat and protein plant foods such as nuts) exposed to high dry temperatures can be potent sources of these pro-oxidant chemicals. In another study, researchers fed diabetics glycotoxin-packed foods, like chicken, fish, and eggs, and their inflammatory markers––tumor necrosis factor, C-reactive protein, and vascular adhesion molecules––shot up. “Thus, in diabetes, environmental (dietary) AGEs promote inflammatory mediators, leading to tissue injury.” The good news is that restriction of these kinds of foods may suppress these inflammatory effects. Appropriate measures to limit AGE intake, such as eliminating meat or using only steaming and boiling as methods for cooking it, “may greatl Continue reading >>

Dr. Bernstein’s Low-carb Diabetes Diet

Dr. Bernstein’s Low-carb Diabetes Diet

Dr. Richard K. Bernstein is a legend in the diabetes community. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes over seven decades ago, created the movement to check blood sugars at home, developed a diabetes management program built on the philosophy that “everyone deserves normal blood sugars” – and then became an endocrinologist so others would take him seriously. In this article, we will look at Dr. Bernstein’s diabetes diet. In essence, it is a low-carb, high-protein and moderate fat diet. He recommends this approach because it maximizes the chances for achieving normalized blood sugars. If you are interested in a less restrictive, more general-purpose low-carb diet, read How to Start a Low-Carb Diabetes Diet. Before we go into the diet itself, let’s look at Dr. Bernstein’s fascinating story. Dr. Bernstein was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 12 in 1946. Dr. Bernstein was diagnosed with diabetes during what is commonly referred to as the diabetes “dark ages”. He had to check his urine for sugar by using a test tube heated over a flame. He had to sterilize his needles and glass syringes by boiling them each day. In Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution, he explains how his blood sugars were not well managed during this time. In fact, back then fat was deemed the ultimate health culprit and so he was put on a low-fat and high-carbohydrate diet. During the first two decades of his life with diabetes, he says his growth was stunted and nearly all his organs quickly began to suffer the consequences of chronic high blood sugar. Heartbreakingly, he suffered many serious complications of diabetes as a young man. Luckily, blood glucose meters were just becoming available. Wikipedia explains: In October 1969, Bernstein came across an advertisement in the trad Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Diet

Diabetes And Diet

There is no one diet for all people with diabetes. There is, however, a "recipe" for eating healthfully that is similar to recommendations for heart health, cancer prevention and weight management. To successfully manage diabetes, you need to understand how foods and nutrition affect your body. Food portions and food choices are important. Carbohydrates, fat and protein need to be balanced to ensure blood sugar levels stay as stable as possible. (This is particularly important for people with Type 1 diabetes.) The keys to a healthy eating plan are: Eat meals and snacks regularly (at planned times). Eat about the same amount of food at each meal or snack. Choose healthful foods to support a healthy weight and heart. Put Together a Plan You need a registered dietitian nutritionist on your team who will work with you to put together an individualized eating plan that takes into account your food preferences, level of physical activity and lifestyle. Your RDN will work with you and your physician to strike the right balance between your eating plan and any diabetes medications you take. Plan Healthy Meals Good health depends on eating a variety of foods that contain the right amounts of carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats, as well as vitamins, minerals, fiber and water. If you have diabetes, a healthy daily eating plan includes: Starchy foods including breads, cereals, pasta, rice, other whole grains and starchy vegetables such as beans, corn and peas Non-starchy vegetables including carrots, green beans and broccoli Fruits Lean meat, fish, poultry, low-fat cheese and tofu Fat-free or low-fat milk and yogurt Healthy fats such as plant-based oils and trans-fat-free spreads The actual amounts of each food group depend on the number of calories you need, which, in turn, de Continue reading >>

46 Local Nigerian Food Recipes For Diabetic Patients

46 Local Nigerian Food Recipes For Diabetic Patients

Find the best Nigerian food recipes for diabetic patients you can follow to fight, prevent and stop Type 1, Type 2 or Gestational diabetes in your body. Diabetes describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate or because the body’s cells do not respond properly to insulin or both. It is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. There are three types of diabetes, namely: Type 1 diabetes: in this case, the body does not produce insulin. It is referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, juvenile diabetes, or early onset diabetes. People usually develop type 1 diabetes before the age of 40, often in early adulthood or teenage years. Type 1 diabetes is nowhere near as common as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Type 2 diabetes: this is whereby the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function, or cells in the body do not react to insulin (insulin resistance). Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are type 2. Some people may be able to control their type 2 diabetes symptoms by losing weight, following a healthy diet, doing plenty of exercises and monitoring their blood glucose level. Type 2 diabetes is typically a progressive disease –it gradually gets worse and the patient will probably end up having to take insulin, usually in tablet form. Overweight and obese people have a much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those with a healthy body weight. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes is also greater as we get older. Men whose testosterone levels are low have to be found to have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes: this type of diabetes affects femal Continue reading >>

Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

Is Alzheimer’s Type 3 Diabetes?

You undoubtedly know about diabetes – a condition in which the body has difficulty with insulin and blood sugar levels. You have also heard about Alzheimer’s disease and its resulting tragic memory loss. What you may not have heard is a relatively new concept suggesting there may be a tie between the two diseases. In fact, some researchers are proposing that Alzheimer’s disease may be a new manifestation of diabetes – calling it "Type 3 Diabetes". This theory has been around since 2005 and was featured more recently in a cover story of New Scientist magazine, titled Food for Thought: What You Eat May Be Killing Your Brain. MyLifeStages talked with Berkeley Neurologist Joshua Kuluva, M.D., about this concept of Type 3 Diabetes. Insulin Resistance and the Brain Insulin resistance is a key factor in the disease of Type 2 Diabetes. In a normally functioning system, insulin is produced by the pancreas to help the body use glucose (sugar) in the blood. When you have a perfect balance of insulin and glucose, the body functions as it should. In Type 1 Diabetes – sometimes called Juvenile Diabetes because it is diagnosed in children or teens – the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin. People with Type 1 Diabetes must carefully watch their diets and use insulin to regulate their metabolism. Diet itself is not the cause of Type I Diabetes. In Type 2 Diabetes, insulin is produced by the pancreas, but is not properly used by the cells. It is thought that the body cells become overloaded with glucose in the blood and become “weary” of responding to insulin. They are then described as being “insulin resistant.” The emerging news seems to be that the brain may also be impacted by insulin resistance. In the brain, usable insulin is crucial for forming memories. I Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide (1). Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions (2). Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of thesen three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn't digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn't raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or "net" carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body's nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it's important to avoid the foods listed below. Sugary beverages are the worst drink choice for someone with diabetes. To begin with, they are very high in carbs, with a 12-ounce (354-ml) can of soda prov Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, it's easy to get carried away with the notion of a diabetic diet. But in reality, your child's dietary needs are no different from a child who doesn't have diabetes. Of course, there are certain considerations you need to be aware of, and understanding the carbohydrate content in food is arguably the most important. In this article, you will learn about the importance of carb counting, with a special emphasis on how fiber and sugar alcohols may also affect your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Nutrition Basics There's really no such thing as a diabetic diet. That's why you should focus instead on providing your child with balanced nutrition. A good nutritional resource to consult is the Food Pyramid. In recent years, the United States Department of Agriculture has made some updates to the standard Food Pyramid that most of us grew up knowing. Instead of being a set-in-stone guideline, now you can create personalized eating plans that are flexible and balanced. To refresh your memory on healthy eating, visit ChooseMyPlate.gov. There are 3 main nutrients in foods—fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. These essential nutrients affect blood glucose in different ways. Fats: Fat typically doesn't break down into sugar in your blood, and in small amounts, it doesn't affect your blood glucose levels. But fat does slow down digestion, and this can cause your blood glucose to rise slower than it normally would. After a high-fat meal, your child's blood glucose may be elevated up to 12 hours after the meal. Proteins: Protein doesn't affect blood glucose unless you eat more than your body needs. In most cases, you need only about 6 ounces or less (which is about the size of 2 decks of cards) at each meal. Carbohydrates: Carbohyd Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

A diabetic diet is a dietary pattern that is used by people with diabetes mellitus or high blood glucose to manage diabetes. There is no single dietary pattern that is best for all people with all types of diabetes. For overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes, any weight-loss diet that the person will adhere to and achieve weight loss on is effective.[1][2] Since carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose levels most significantly, the greatest debate is regarding how low in carbohydrates the diet should be. This is because although lowering carbohydrate intake will lead to reduced blood glucose levels, this conflicts with the traditional establishment view that carbohydrates should be the main source of calories. Recommendations of the fraction of total calories to be obtained from carbohydrate are generally in the range of 20% to 45%,[3][4][5] but recommendations can vary as widely as from 16% to 75%.[6] The most agreed-upon recommendation is for the diet to be low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, while relatively high in dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber. People with diabetes are also encouraged to eat small frequent meals a day. Likewise, people with diabetes may be encouraged to reduce their intake of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index (GI), although this is also controversial.[7] (In cases of hypoglycemia, they are advised to have food or drink that can raise blood glucose quickly, such as a sugary sports drink, followed by a long-acting carbohydrate (such as rye bread) to prevent risk of further hypoglycemia.) Others question the usefulness of the glycemic index and recommend high-GI foods like potatoes and rice. It has been claimed that oleic acid has a slight advantage over linoleic acid in reducing plasma glucose.[ Continue reading >>

The 11 Worst Foods For Diabetics

The 11 Worst Foods For Diabetics

Diabetes, put simply, is the presence of too much glucose in your blood. Glucose is an important source of energy for cells and the brain’s main source of fuel, but too much of it can lead to major health problems. A hormone called insulin is responsible for allowing glucose into the cells, but with type 1 diabetes the immune system attacks the insulin; with type 2 diabetes the cells become resistant to insulin. In both cases, sugar is left to build up in the bloodstream. To control diabetes, it’s best to avoid foods that can raise your blood sugar too much or too fast. Obviously, foods that are high in sugar—both processed and natural—can cause blood sugar to spike, but plenty of foods that aren’t sweet, like those high in refined carbohydrates, can still have a high glycemic index and add too much sugar too quickly to your bloodstream (refined starches act a lot like sugar once they’re digested). The glycemic index is a measurement of how fast a carbohydrate raises your blood sugar; it’s suggested that when a diabetic eats one of the foods on our list (which have high glycemic indexes), it be balanced out with a low-glycemic index food, like steel-cut oatmeal or non-starchy vegetables. The Mayo Clinic suggests that diabetics center their diet on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains instead of simple carbs, animal products, and sweets. There’s no specific diabetes diet, but some foods should certainly be avoided, or at least consumed in strict moderation. Foods that are high in cholesterol, fat, sodium, carbohydrates, and calories are unhealthy in general, but are even more dangerous for diabetics because their health is already compromised, and their body is working overtime to keep them healthy. Each case of diabetes is unique, so diabetics should wor Continue reading >>

20 Foods To Avoid If You Have Diabetes

20 Foods To Avoid If You Have Diabetes

A large part of keeping your diabetes in control is about making the right food choices. If you have diabetes, a general rule to follow is to stay off foods that are high in sugar. However, some foods and drinks may appear to be healthy options but might contain hidden sugar and fats. And it’s not just sugar you need to watch out for as increased carbs and fats in your diet may also contribute to higher blood sugar levels. Too confusing? Here’s a list of 20 foods that you need to avoid if you have diabetes. 20 Foods To Stay Away From 1. Dried Fruit The high fiber content and nutrients might make dried fruit look like a healthy option but you might want to reconsider if your have Type 2 diabetes. Dried fruit undergoes dehydration which causes it’s natural sugars to get very concentrated. Though it’s a better snacking option when compared to cookies, it will still send your blood sugar soaring. Just have some fresh fruit like strawberries or grapefruit instead. 2. White Rice, Bread, And Flour While most diabetics are wary of sugar, they usually don’t keep a tab on eating carbs. Low quality carbs like rice and foods made with white flour, like bread and pasta, act similar to sugar once the digestive process begins. This means that they with interfere with body’s glucose levels. Switching to whole grains such as oatmeal, barley, and brown rice will help in keeping the bad carbs in check. 3. Full-Fat Dairy Most people know that full-fat dairy products contain saturated fat that can increase your bad cholesterol (LDL) and increase the risk of heart disease. As a diabetic, you should also avoid dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, ice-cream, and cream cheese that’s made with whole milk. The reason being saturated fats have also been found to increase insul Continue reading >>

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

People around the world are eating low-carbohydrate diets to treat their diabetes. But all plant foods, other than seeds, are carbs. So what can you eat? Is it all animal products, or are there other options? We know the arguments against eating carbs. Other than fiber, carbs are either sugars or starches that break down into sugars. Since people with diabetes have little to no effective insulin, which is necessary for handling sugars (glucose), they probably shouldn’t eat them. But is this argument totally true? Perhaps not. Vegans and vegetarians tend to eat a lot of carbs, and many of them seem to do quite well with diabetes. Many people in poor countries who cannot afford meat also have relatively low rates of diabetes. So what’s their secret? What are they eating? It seems clear that the successful ones eat very low amounts of refined sugars and simple starches. They may have small amounts of truly whole grains (not stuff that is marketed as “whole grain” but is actually highly processed). They eat small amounts of fruits and starchy vegetables. (Diabetic low-carb guru Dr. Richard Bernstein says he hasn’t eaten a piece of fruit in decades.) What’s left? Well, from a carb standpoint, you can eat as much animal food, like meat and eggs, as you want. They don’t have any carbs (although dairy products do). You can vary that with sea animals — they don’t contain carbs either. There are probably a few health risks from eating so much meat. Your toxic load will be higher, unless you consistently eat organic free-range meat and wild-caught, small fish. You might get too much fat if you overdo it, but advocates like Bernstein have found no problems for themselves or their patients. However, from the standpoint of your wallet, the animals, and the planet, e Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Eat To Beat Diabetes In Just Eight Weeks: It's The Life-changing Diet That Can Help You Avoid Or Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes. And The Best Part? It's The Tasty Way To Get Back To Health

Eat To Beat Diabetes In Just Eight Weeks: It's The Life-changing Diet That Can Help You Avoid Or Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes. And The Best Part? It's The Tasty Way To Get Back To Health

The food we eat today, along with our sedentary lifestyle, is not only making us fat but putting us at risk of Type 2 diabetes — and it’s one of the greatest epidemics of our time. More than 4 million Britons now have this disease, while one in three adults has raised blood sugar levels that can lead to diabetes, yet most don’t know it. Now, help is at hand. Based on research carried out at the University of Newcastle, I have put together a simple diet plan and lifestyle programme that should not only reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, but can reverse it in those already suffering — all in only eight weeks. What’s more, it’s not just for those at highest risk but for anyone who wants to lose weight fast and regain control of their health. Sounds good? Well, here’s a little story to inspire you. Hanging in the wardrobe at 56-year-old Alan Tutty’s home in Sunderland is an old shirt that he won’t be throwing out any time soon. According to Alan, a father of four, it once used to fit him ‘like cling-film’. These days, it’s much looser — which is all down to the diet he went on three years ago. In just eight weeks, Alan lost two stone. And he has since kept most of that weight off, even though he admits to being ‘no angel’. ‘Occasionally I’ll have takeaways, and wine, cheese and beer,’ he says. ‘But I put the shirt on every so often to see if it’s still loose, and as long as it is, I’m doing fine.’ Far more significant than the fit of his shirt, though, is the fact that Alan, who was diagnosed with diabetes shortly before he began the diet, has had normal blood sugar levels ever since. Yet he might still have had Type 2 diabetes today had he not been lucky enough to be one of 11 people recruited for a research trial at Ne Continue reading >>

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