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Type 1 Diabetes Foods To Avoid

Foods To Avoid For People With Diabetes

Foods To Avoid For People With Diabetes

Taking control of what foods they eat not only helps people manage their diabetes but also influences how well they feel and how much energy they have every day. We take a look at what foods people with diabetes should avoid and outline what they should eat instead. Foods to avoid with diabetes Having diabetes does not have to stop people from eating the foods they enjoy. However, it does mean that they should eat smaller portions, less often. The Institute of Medicine recommend that carbohydrate intake for most people should be between 45-65 percent of total calories. This higher carbohydrate intake is consistent with plant-based diets, which have shown benefit for diabetes management in well-designed, long-term studies. However, some research has shown that people can improve their blood sugar levels when their carbohydrate intake is between 5-35 percent of calories. Much of the research comes from short-term studies for higher-fat diets, such as the ketogenic diet and Mediterranean diets. Experts are just beginning to understand the influence that the gut bacteria have on health. What is known is that high-fiber carbohydrates feed gut bacteria while a high-fat, low-carb diet often results in gut bacteria death. This is far from ideal as people with diabetes already have lower levels of gut bacteria. Populations around the world that live the longest, known as Blue Zones, all eat a plant-based diet, rich in whole foods and carbohydrates. The key to eating well with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthful foods from each of the food groups. Foods to avoid within the major food groups and suggested replacements are listed below. Grains All grains are starches. Avoiding refined grains is a smart choice for people with diabetes, regardless of chosen diet, as they affect Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, it's easy to get carried away with the notion of a diabetic diet. But in reality, your child's dietary needs are no different from a child who doesn't have diabetes. Of course, there are certain considerations you need to be aware of, and understanding the carbohydrate content in food is arguably the most important. In this article, you will learn about the importance of carb counting, with a special emphasis on how fiber and sugar alcohols may also affect your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Nutrition Basics There's really no such thing as a diabetic diet. That's why you should focus instead on providing your child with balanced nutrition. A good nutritional resource to consult is the Food Pyramid. In recent years, the United States Department of Agriculture has made some updates to the standard Food Pyramid that most of us grew up knowing. Instead of being a set-in-stone guideline, now you can create personalized eating plans that are flexible and balanced. To refresh your memory on healthy eating, visit ChooseMyPlate.gov. There are 3 main nutrients in foods—fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. These essential nutrients affect blood glucose in different ways. Fats: Fat typically doesn't break down into sugar in your blood, and in small amounts, it doesn't affect your blood glucose levels. But fat does slow down digestion, and this can cause your blood glucose to rise slower than it normally would. After a high-fat meal, your child's blood glucose may be elevated up to 12 hours after the meal. Proteins: Protein doesn't affect blood glucose unless you eat more than your body needs. In most cases, you need only about 6 ounces or less (which is about the size of 2 decks of cards) at each meal. Carbohydrates: Carbohyd Continue reading >>

50 Worst Foods For Diabetes

50 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Controlling your diabetes requires a careful balance of lifestyle habits, including eating right, exercising, and taking your proper medication. But it can be tricky to navigate proper nutrition, especially with foods that sound healthy but can actually wreak havoc on your blood sugar and overall health. In fact, diabetics are two to four times more likely than people without diabetes to die of heart disease or experience a life-threatening stroke, according to the American Heart Association. It’s even more dangerous for those who don’t control their diabetes; it can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, and kidney disease. To stay on track, be sure to avoid these 50 foods that will spike your blood sugar and lead to chronic inflammation. Luckily, life with diabetes doesn’t have to be flavor free. “After working with thousands of diabetic individuals over the years, I noticed that many asked me the same question at their first appointment. ‘Can I still eat my favorite foods?’” says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, author of Eat What You Love Diabetes Cookbook. “And the answer from me was always ‘Yes!’ It’s the portion sizes and frequency that makes the most difference, in addition to how the food is prepared.” As always, be sure to consult with your doctor, registered dietitian, or certified diabetes educator before making any drastic changes to your diet. Some of these recommendations may change if you are suffering from low blood sugar. If you’re looking for what you can enjoy, be sure to stock up on the 50 Best Foods for Diabetes. Sure, it seems healthy, but a pulverized, low-fiber smoothie made primarily of fruit isn’t the best bet for those with diabetes. “Smoothies can be large whacks of carbs and sugar, especially if there’s no protein or heal Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid For Type 1 Diabetics - T1d Living Blog

Foods To Avoid For Type 1 Diabetics - T1d Living Blog

When I got diagnosed with type 1 diabetes one of the many questions that I had racing through my mind was,are there foods to avoid for type 1 diabetics? Right next to, shit, what am I going to put in my fall candy dish now? Yes, we all react to major life changes in our own odd ways that sometimes dont make any sense at all. But when I asked the doctors if there arefoods to avoid for type 1 diabeticsher answer was more odd than my candy dish debacle and looking back, was probably the worst piece of advice Ive ever gotten as a diabetic Increase your carbs, eat whatever you want, just cover it with insulin and youll be fine. I should have trusted my instinct. I should have done more research. I knew something didnt seem right when she told me, a person whose body could no longer process sugar, to eat more sugar. But instead I stayed, listened, and took her advice. The next seven years were THE WORST blood sugar numbers Ive ever had in my life. It was a constant roller coaster ride that was leaving me burnt out and feeling like complete shit. Now, before you get the wrong idea, I dont blame my doctor for my own personal diabetes management. But I will say that following her advice was HALF of my problem. Technically, yes, I can eat whatever I want and not die as long as I give myself insulin. Even an XLhot fudge sundae with cherries, bananas, sprinkles, and cookie dough bits is not off limits. HOWEVER. My insulin the one that is made in a lab. is not the same insulin that a non-diabetics body naturally makes and it does not work the same way. My insulin injectionsare also based on loose math and a guestimate. If that estimate is wrong, my body doesnt produce more insulin or glucose (at least not efficiently) to fix the mistake. This mistake can be really big or really sma Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Maintaining a healthy diet is important for type 1 diabetes management. A type 1 diabetes diet is designed to provide maximum nutrition, while also monitoring intake of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. However, there’s no single universal diabetes diet. It involves being mindful of how you eat and how your body will respond to certain foods. People with type 1 diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar levels. Without proper diet, exercise, and insulin therapy, a person with type 1 diabetes could experience health complications. Complications associated with type 1 diabetes include: high blood pressure, which increases risk for heart attack, stroke, and poor circulation kidney damage nerve damage skin sores and infections, which can cause pain and may lead to tissue death Following proper dietary guidelines can help mitigate the difficulties of type 1 diabetes and help you avoid health complications. It can also improve your overall quality of life. Just like there’s no standard treatment for type 1 diabetes, there’s no standard diet for diabetes. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you come up with meal plans and create a diet that works for you in the long term. It’s easy to reach for fast food and other processed foods when you’re short on time and money. However, these foods offer minimal nutrients and are high in fat, sugar, and salt. Planning your meals ahead of time and grocery shopping regularly can help cut down on any “emergency eating.” A well-stocked kitchen of healthy food can also cut down on unnecessary sugar, carbohydrates, sodium, and fat that can spike blood sugar. An important aspect of any diabetic diet is consistency. To maintain blood sugar levels, don’t skip meals, try to eat around the same time each day, and pay attention to foo Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

Cooking For The Type 1 Diabetic

If you are a caregiver for someone with type 1 diabetes, you know that a healthy diet and proper food preparation are an important part of controlling diabetes. "You don't need to buy special foods,” advises Sue Tocher, MS, RD, dietitian and diabetes clinical program coordinator at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. “You should prepare the same healthy foods that would be recommended for someone without diabetes. That means plenty of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and a low concentration of fats and sweets." Diabetes: Food and Blood Glucose Levels It's important for diabetics to keep their glucose from getting too low or too high. This is achieved by regularly checking blood glucose levels and regulating insulin dosage and carbohydrate intake. It's best to eat about the same amount of carbohydrates each day, eat and snack at regular hours, and avoid skipping meals. "Carbohydrates are the most important food group for diabetics,” says Tocher. “These are the foods that impact glucose levels. Fats and proteins supply calories but have little effect on blood glucose." Foods that contain lots of carbs include bagels, crackers, dried beans and peas, fruit, pasta and rice, and of course, sweets. Diabetes: The Food Pyramid The diabetes food pyramid illustrates how to make the best food choices. The pyramid has six color-coded categories, each representing a different food group. "The idea of the food pyramid is to get you to eat from a variety of food groups,” says Tocher. “The foods closest to the bottom are the foods that are closest to their natural state, such as whole grains, fresh vegetables, beans, and fresh fruit. You want to get your calories from the bottom up." Foods from the bottom also provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Moving up the pyramid, as t Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

If you have type 1 diabetes, it is important to know how many carbohydrates you eat at a meal. This information helps you determine how much insulin you should take with your meal to maintain blood sugar (glucose) control. Carbohydrates are the main type of food that raises blood sugar. The starch, fruit and milk groups of the Food Group Pyramid for Diabetes are high in carbs. Foods in the Other Carbohydrates and Combination Food groups are also high in carbs. The vegetable group has a small amount of carbohydrates. The meat and fat groups have few or no carbs. The amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal will determine how high your blood sugar rises after the meal. The other two major nutrients, protein and fat ,also have an effect on blood glucose levels, though it is not as rapid or great as carbohydrates. Most people with diabetes can control their blood sugar by limiting carbohydrate servings to 2-4 per meal and 1-2 per snack. A delicate balance of carbohydrate intake, insulin, and physical activity is necessary for the best blood sugar (glucose) levels. Eating carbohydrates increases your blood sugar (glucose) level. Exercise tends to decrease it (although not always). If the three factors are not in balance, you can have wide swings in blood sugar (glucose) levels. If you have type 1 diabetes and take a fixed dose of insulin, the carbohydrate content of your meals and snacks should be consistent from day to day. CHILDREN AND DIABETES Weight and growth patterns can help determine if a child with type 1 diabetes is getting enough nutrition. Changes in eating habits and more physical activity help improve blood sugar (glucose) control. For children with diabetes, special occasions (like birthdays or Halloween) require additional planning because of the extra sw Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide (1). Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions (2). Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of thesen three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn't digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn't raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or "net" carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body's nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it's important to avoid the foods listed below. Sugary beverages are the worst drink choice for someone with diabetes. To begin with, they are very high in carbs, with a 12-ounce (354-ml) can of soda prov Continue reading >>

Eating Well With Diabetes

Eating Well With Diabetes

Eating well with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes means that you can eat the same healthy diet that's good for everyone—a diet that incorporates a variety of nutritious and delicious foods. Healthy foods can help you maintain normal blood glucose levels and manage your diabetes. There's actually no such thing as a diabetic diet, so you're not stuck eating boring or bland foods. When you have diabetes, you can eat a variety of foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, non-fat dairy foods, lean meats, beans, and healthy fats (eg, olive oil). To help you create a healthy eating plan that works best for you, work with a registered dietitian (RD) or certified diabetes educator (CDE). An RD or CDE can also teach you how to read food labels and count the amount of carbohydrates in your food—crucial information for people with diabetes. There are 2 sections in this article: Find out about eating well with type 1 diabetes or eating well with type 2 diabetes. Eating Well with Type 1 Diabetes When you have type 1 diabetes, it's a balancing act of healthy eating and the insulin you take to achieve blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible. Having type 1 diabetes means that your body can't fully use the food you're eating unless you balance it with the right amount of insulin. Insulin—a hormone produced by your pancreas—binds with glucose and transports it throughout the body. The insulin helps your body, especially your muscles, use glucose efficiently. Because what you eat and how much insulin you take needs to be in sync to maintain normal blood glucose levels, eating well with type 1 diabetes means you need to plan your meals. An RD or CDE can help you kick-start your meal planning. Counting carbs also plays a significant role in eating well with type 1 Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

Despite conventional wisdom, a diabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you have to commit to a bland and boring diet. There are loads of delicious foods that are safe and healthy to eat—you may just not know what they are yet. But that’s okay, because we’re here to help! Read on to discover the best and worst drinks, grains, proteins, and produce picks for your diet, according to top nutritionists. Once you’ve read through the list and added some things to your shopping list, click over to these 15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes to find out how to transform the Eat This picks into delicious, satisfying meals. According to the American Diabetes Association, it’s important to choose the most nutritious whole grains possible. Although grains help to maintain steady blood-sugar levels and provide heart-healthy fiber, white flour-based products can’t claim the same. Because the bran, germ, and endosperm have been compromised, these foods elevate blood-sugar levels and should only be consumed on occasion. “Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which seems to have an anti-diabetic effect,” explains Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN, author of The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook., adding,* “I advise people with diabetes to steer clear of added sugars by enjoying savory rather than sweet oatmeal.” For some tips on whipping up a delectable bowl of oats, dig into these 20 Savory Oatmeal Recipes for a Flat Belly. Though you likely assumed sugary donuts and muffins weren’t the best way to kick off your day, we bet you didn’t realize just how awful certain pastries can be. “Cinnamon rolls, for example, can contain more saturated fat and added sugars than people with diabetes should have in an entire day,” cautions Newgent. Yikes! Always turn down t Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

Through twenty-five years of working with people with diabetes, when they come in for diabetes education, their first question is most often “What can I eat (or drink).” The next question is often, “What can’t I eat (or drink)? In this article, we will explore what foods are best to eat when you have just been diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes, and Type 2 Diabetes, and what foods are best avoided. Quick Links (click to jump to specific section) There is no other guide available on the internet that will guide you through the best foods to choose, and the best foods to avoid. Take heed, as some foods in the American diet are detrimental. These are also the same foods that Americans are addicted to. On occasion, you will be able to eat from the foods to avoid list, such as on a holiday, or your birthday. It shouldn’t become a regular occurrence to eat foods that are best avoided if you have Pre-Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes. Also, eating healthier throughout your lifespan, can prevent Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes from ever surfacing at all. Starting to eat a healthy diet can help you to reverse your Pre-Diabetes, along with regular physical activity, and sometimes medication (most often Metformin). You can either get Type 2 Diabetes in good control, or you can reverse it to a Pre-Diabetes state in some cases, if you work on healthy lifestyle changes. Though it’s not always possible to reverse Type 2 Diabetes, it is certainly worth a shot. My new book to come out soon, entitled, “The Practical Guide for the Reversal of Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes,” published by The Diabetes Council, will explore this topic in depth. Stay tuned! Eating appropriate foods Knowing which foods to eat, and which ones to avoid, can help you to manage your blood sugars, and avoid Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

It's important to eat a healthy diet when you have type 1 diabetes. That doesn't mean you can't enjoy tasty food, including some of your favorites. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops making insulin. So you take insulin every day either through shots or a pump. It’s also key to track your blood sugar levels. Insulin is only part of the picture. Diet and exercise also play important roles in helping keep your blood sugar levels stable. When you make healthy food choices and eat consistent amounts through the day, it can help control your sugars. It can also lower your chance of diabetes-related problems like heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. Some experts used to think there was a "diabetes diet." They thought people with diabetes had to avoid all foods with sugars or stop eating certain other foods. But when you have type 1, you can eat the same healthy diet as everyone else. Follow some general guidelines: Eat less unhealthy fat. Cut back on the saturated fats you find in high-fat meats like bacon and regular ground beef, as well as full-fat dairy like whole milk and butter. Unhealthy fats raise your chance of heart disease. With diabetes, you face higher-than-average odds of getting heart disease. Make smart food choices to lower that risk. Get enough fiber. It may help control your blood sugar. You can get fiber from whole grains, beans, and fruits and vegetables. Try to get 25-30 grams a day. Those high-fiber foods are always better choices than low-fiber carbs such as refined 'white' grains and processed sugary foods. Carbohydrates are your body's main source of energy. You get them from many foods, like grains (pasta, bread, crackers, and cookies), fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and sugars. Carbs raise your blood sugar levels faster than Continue reading >>

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