diabetestalk.net

Type 1 Diabetes Family Support

Home - Typeonenation

Home - Typeonenation

Tidepool Adds Support from Medtronic Minimed 670G Hybrid Closed Loop Earlier this month, Tidepool, a nonprofit software development organization and JDRF partner, announced a significant update to its diabetes data management platform. Tidepool now offers people wearing the Medtronic Minimed 670G hybrid closed loop systems, as well as 630G and 640G systems, free software to upload, visualize and anonymously donate their diabetes data to researchers, [] Coping with Distress and T1D A Facebook Live Event Distress and type 1 diabetes (T1D) go hand-in-hand far more often than we would like to admit, whether you have a disease yourself or if you are the parent, partner, spouse, or general caregiver of the person living with T1D. Learning to manage distress alongside T1D can be challenging, but it is possible.JDRF hosted a [] How Diabetes Camp Gave Me Community: #MyGreatestSupporter I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) at age 11, shortly after starting the sixth grade. The diagnosis only exacerbated the feelings of being unsure of yourself that come with making the transition from elementary to middle school. While I was fortunate enough to have friends and teachers that did their best to understand [] Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Family Support Program - Fsp

Diabetes | Family Support Program - Fsp

Diabetes is a disease that affects the body's ability to process food by converting it into energy. There are two main types of diabetes: type1 and type 2. 1 Type1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in children. It occurs when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone necessary for the body to transfer glucose (sugar) from the blood stream into the body's cells where it is used as energy. 2 Know risk factors for type1 diabetes are family history and the presence of certain genes. Some possible risk factors are exposure to certain viruses and low levels of vitamin D. 3 Type2 diabetes is more common in adults, but is growing in frequency among children. 4 Type2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to the insulin it produces or when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. 5 The primary risk factor for developing type2 diabetes in children is being overwieght. Other risk factors include inactivity, family history, being female, and for unknown reasons being of Native American, Hispanic, Black, Asian, or Pacific Island decent. 6 Symptoms of type1 and type2 diabetes include frequent urination, unusual thirst, extreme hunger, unusual weight loss, extreme fatigue, and irritability. Additional symptoms of type2 diabetes are frequent infections, blurred vision, cuts/bruises that are slow to heal, tingling or numbness in the hands/feet, and recurring skin, gum, or bladder infections. 7 Fact Sheets and Frequently Asked Questions The National Diabetes Education Program has numerous diabetes fact sheets including diabetes among children and adolescents , diabetes prevention , and diabetes among various ethnic groups. Continue reading >>

Support From Parents And Families

Support From Parents And Families

Previous Topic | Online discussion groups and blogs School and diabetes | Next Topic Having a child or teenager diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes has an impact on the whole family, brothers, sisters, grandparents, and most of all on parents. It doesn't necessarily mean that diabetes changes the way family members feel about each other, but it can affect family routines and can at times make everyone more tense and emotional. Here young people talk about how their families responded to their diabetes, and how it took time for some families to learn to cope without 'stressing out'. Lewis is 12 years old and lives with Mum, Dad, sister and younger brother. He recently started high school. Ethnic background: English. Lewis: I think for all of us it was definitely a shock at first and thinking of the idea of living it my whole life and having to do my injections, my pump is probably really daunting. So it, the fact it takes you a while to get over the fact that right, Ive got it I have to deal with it. There is nothing I can do. I mean I was only small then so I was thinking, the doctors will fix it, the doctors will fix it. And soon it started to occur to me that they werent going to fix it. So Im just going to have to step up and sort it because nobody else is going to do it. So thats when I start m-. My mum and dad started to teach me how to carb count and how to inject. I mean I was still unsure what to do but they were trying their best to help me as well. So we sort of like we learn from each others mistakes and we sort of help each other. So like if my mum or dad forgets then I can remind them. And if I forget something they can remind me. So its sort of like a team work, team work to keep yourself like team work to learn everything but sort of half, half team work, hal Continue reading >>

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Finding The Right Diabetes Support Groups

Finding the Right Diabetes Support Groups Sometimes a person with diabetes can feel very alone and different. Support groups are important and helpful to people with diabetes, because they provide a venue to meet others who share similar medical and psychosocial concerns, according to Marilyn Ritholz, Ph.D., Licensed Staff Psychologist , at Joslin Diabetes Center. By meeting with others who have diabetes, you can feel that the members of the group can understand your experience firsthand. By sharing their experiences, group members can feel part of a community and gain a greater sense of value and power from this feeling of belonging. Joslin offers different types of diabetes support groups. Some of these groups include: Womens Diabetes Support Group- We have found that women of different ages are facing specific issues. Therefore, the group provides a venue for discussion of particular concerns for women with diabetes, Ritholz says. For example, Joslin is now running a womens group for ages 21-35 years old that have type 1 diabetes and are facing concerns regarding diabetes management, acceptance of diabetes, relationships, and consideration of pregnancy. Couples Support Group- These groups only meet once and have couples share concerns and discuss what its like to live with diabetes in a relationship. Both the person with diabetes and the significant other get support and understanding of diabetes from different perspectives. Joslin offers other diabetes support groups , such as coping with diabetes, mens age-based support groups, young and middle-aged womens diabetes support group, and a Latino support group. There are also support groups available for children with diabetes and their parents. Each program includes supervised group activities for children and young Continue reading >>

Support For Parents: The Pep Squad

Support For Parents: The Pep Squad

Whether your family is new todiabetesor youre encountering a new set of challenges, the DRI Foundation is here to help. After all,we're in this together. Our PEP Squad -- Parents Empowering Parents -- offers emotional support and practical tips from professionals and fellow parents wholive with diabetes day-to-day. On ourprivate PEP Squad group on Facebook , you can connect with other diabetes parents, sharestories and struggles, complain, vent, or mentor and shed new light. Someone is usually "out there"at any time of day-- even in the wee hours after that 3 a.m. blood sugar check. Sometimes, all you need is to know youre not alone and thatsomeone else gets it. The DRI Foundation takes the opinions of this group seriously. We responded to members' concerns and because this is aclosed, or private, group, only approvedmembers are able to read posts. Some of the topics discussed include insurance issues, nighttime testing, travel tips, facing fears, holiday hints, bragging rights (about the brave kids!), tools, teens and tantrums. Whatever the issue, there are usually comments or suggestions. However, please remember that everyone is different, and you should check with your health care professionals before changing something your doctor had previously advised. Getmonthly news-you-can-use likebalancing life at work and athome, travel tips, parental grief, managing sick days, baby sitters and more. Learn from diabetes experts and parents just like you who might already have dealt with the same issue you're facing now. Sign up as a DRI Insider and we'll email the next "PEP Talk" to your inbox. Your child was just diagnosed with diabetes. Now what? So many parentshave asked this question.Our PEP Squad brochure can give you the answersand information on how to go on living y Continue reading >>

Emotional Support For Type 1 Diabetes

Emotional Support For Type 1 Diabetes

A support group can provide you with emotional encouragement as you deal with challenges unique to people with type 1 diabetes. "Having a support group can put you in touch with other people who are going through the same thing," notes Jennifer Goldman-Levine, PharmD, a diabetes educator and associate professor of pharmacy practice at Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in Boston. Goldman-Levine says that support groups are especially important because being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can be isolating. "Only a small population in the diabetes community — 5 to 10 percent — has type 1 diabetes." Dana Lewis, a student at the University of Alabama and a diabetes advocate who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 14, agrees that feeling alone is a significant issue for type 1 diabetics. "Diabetes is not a disease or an illness that anyone can see. People don't think [having type 1 diabetes is] a big deal, but any fluctuations in your blood sugar can affect your mood and your performance in the classroom or at work," Lewis explains. A major benefit of type 1 diabetes support groups is "having someone who understands what it is like to live with that," she adds. Type 1 Diabetes: In-Person Support Groups When you get together with others who have type 1 diabetes, you can encourage each other, share ideas, talk about your experiences, and find new ways to cope with your condition. "There are [specific] problems that may arise in patients with type 1 diabetes, and sometimes going to support groups with other people who have been living with it longer than you can help," explains Goldman-Levine. She says that support group members can teach you things like how to adjust your insulin levels based on what you eat. "You can learn a lot from other people Continue reading >>

How To Support A Family Member With Type 1 Diabetes

How To Support A Family Member With Type 1 Diabetes

How to Support a Family Member with Type 1 Diabetes When your child or your brother, or your spouse has Type 1 diabetes, you sometimes feel like a waterboy on the sidelines of a big game, wanting to help (particularly when your team is in trouble) but unable to run on the field. But there are ways that you, as a family member or close friend to someone with living with T1D, can assist and really make a difference. Here are some ideas. Be an Exercise Buddy. For those of us with T1 just like anyone else developing and maintaining an exercise program can be a challenge over the long run. Even for seasoned athletes who love to be in motion, there are peaks and valleys, days (or weeks or months) when momentum flags and wed rather sleep in. For those times, having an exercise buddy can help. Knowing that someone is counting on us to be at the track, the pool, or the gym, gets us out the door. If you encourage us, during and after strenuous exercise, to check our BG levels, well love you all the more. Do the Work. The average person who doesnt have diabetes doesnt know the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 and probably doesnt care. Youre not average. As a family member of someone whos been diagnosed, you know the difference and possess a rudimentary knowledge of the condition and how your loved one manages it. But when someone you love is T1, a rudimentary knowledge is not enough. Get some books, or spend some quality time with Google. Become an expert. Your loved one already is. Learn the Language Type 1 diabetes is like a small country, with its own language and dialect. Learn it. Master the acronyms and terms that people with T1 use when talking about their condition. Then, when your loved one starts talking about her basal rate and her bolus and her A1Cs, you dont have Continue reading >>

Everyday Living With Diabetes Described By Family Members Of Adult People With Type 1 Diabetes

Everyday Living With Diabetes Described By Family Members Of Adult People With Type 1 Diabetes

International Journal of Family Medicine Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 967872, 8 pages School of Health Sciences, Nursing Science, University of Tampere, Kuntokatu 4, 33520 Tampere, Finland Academic Editor: Christos D. Lionis Copyright © 2013 Tuula-Maria Rintala et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The aim of this study was to explore family members’ experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members’ views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members’ participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members’ point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases all over the world. The aim of diabetes management is good metabolic control and the preventio Continue reading >>

Support Groups | Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia

Support Groups | Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia hosts a wide range of family support groups. These groups welcome new families and are available to provide comfort and solace to parents and others who are coping with a child's chronic medical condition, illness or injury. Through these groups, parents and caregivers meet others facing similar issues. They can exchange helpful, practical information and learn new skills to help in caring for their child. They can also learn to manage the stress family members may be experiencing as a result of their child's diagnosis or medical condition. Children's Hospitalhosts the following support groups on the hospital campus. Please note, however, that these groups are parent-led and are not directly affiliated with the hospital: This support group is for all with a CAID/SAID (Childhood Auto-inflammatory Diseases/Systemic Auto-inflammatory Diseases) and is not limited to CHOP patients. Speakers will discuss state-of-the-art treatments, new innovations and support strategies for patients. Food and drinks will be provided as well as some activities for the children. Meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, April 22 from 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. in the Hope Auditorium on CHOP's main campus.Email [email protected] with any questions. This group offers positive support, interaction and education for children and teens with Type 1 Diabetes and their parents and caregivers. Get more information and learn how to become involved . Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Parents' Group This support group for parents meets twice a year. Call Alan Tuttle,MSW, LCSW,at 215-590-6875. This group offers support for caregivers of children with HIV-AIDS who are served by Children's Hospital. Call Special Immunology at 215-590-2956. This group is for all 6- to 12-year-old children Continue reading >>

Peer And Family Support In Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Peer And Family Support In Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Objective: To examine social support and peer and family involvement in relation to diabetes management within a developmental context. Methods: Sixty-eight youths ages 8 to 17 diagnosed with type 1 diabetes participated. This study represents the phase 1 data from a multisystemic, home-based intervention. Data included parent and youth report of disease management and conflict, youth-reported perceptions of support, peer participation in the intervention, and HbA1c. Results: Adolescents perceived greater diabetes-related peer support than did school-age children. Perceived peer and family support were not correlated with metabolic control. Peer participation in the intervention was correlated with metabolic control. Conclusions: There is a developmental shift in perceptions of peer support. Increased perceptions of peer and family support overall may not result in improved metabolic control. Social support interventions should focus on the types of support that are most highly associated with positive health outcomes. adolescents , diabetes , peers , social support Management of type 1 diabetes is complex and challenging for children and adolescents due to the necessary integration of daily medical tasks (e.g., blood glucose monitoring, insulin injections) and lifestyle modifications (e.g., eating and exercise patterns) into everyday life. Although near-normal blood glucose control may decrease the risk of several long-term diabetic complications in individuals with type 1 diabetes (DCCT Research Group, 1993 , 1994 ), children and adolescents often have difficulty juggling all of the aspects of an arduous treatment regimen. Several investigators have found that this is particularly problematic for adolescents as compared to younger children ( Anderson, Auslander, Jung Continue reading >>

The Friends & Family Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

The Friends & Family Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

Maybe it’s the friend’s child next door or a member in the family who has Type 1 diabetes. Perhaps you’ll be in charge of care at some point or are simply interested in learning more about T1. Consider this guide to help you navigate Type 1 as a friend or family member. What is Type 1? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that affects a person’s pancreas. The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, a hormone people need to get energy from food. Our pancreas, for reasons that have not been identified, does not produce any insulin. As a result, we need to inject or continually infuse insulin through a pump and carefully balance our insulin doses with eating and daily activities. We must also regularly monitor our blood-sugar levels. Type 1 is a non-stop and 24/7 balancing act that we must maneuver every day. There is no way to prevent Type 1 and there is no cure (currently!). How do you manage it? We get by with a little help from our friends! These include our glucose meter, insulin, needles, and monitors. The glucose meter is a device that measures blood sugar. We use a device that pricks our finger and we put the blood sample onto a test strip. From there, the test strip is read by the meter and gives us a number on the meter screen. We can get insulin into our bodies through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. Injections are delivered to our bodies through insulin pens and needles. There are two types of insulin that we use. Fast-acting insulin gives our bodies insulin right away and is taken with meals or to correct a high blood sugar. Fast-acting insulin is used multiple times a day, depending on when you eat. The other is long-acting insulin, which is given once a day. Long-acting insulin is a slow release insulin that is given to your Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes: How To Help Your Child

Managing Type 1 Diabetes: How To Help Your Child

How to Support Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes When a child learns he or she has type 1 diabetes, it's literally life-changing. "This is a condition that has to be managed 24 hours a day, seven days a week," says Steve Winer, co-chair of the JDRF Online Diabetes Support Team. Thats a lot to take in for you and for your kid. While frequent finger pricks and insulin injections might be top of mind, it's smart to also pay attention to your child's emotional needs. Here are some of the feelings your child might have and how you can help. Having type 1 diabetes can be scary, especially when you start hearing about all the potential long-term complications, such as blindness and a shorter life span. How can you ease their worries while being realistic? Consider getting a mental health expert on board as early in the process as possible. "A lot of families find this can be helpful at diagnosis to discuss how their lives have changed, says Debbie Butler, associate director of pediatric programs at the Joslin Diabetes Center. Counseling can also helpful when the child or teen seems burned out or overwhelmed, or if theres diabetes-related conflict going on in the family. Peer support is important, too. You can help your child find new friends with type 1 by seeking out diabetes camps and local events in your area. Check with your diabetes clinic or agencies such as JDRF. If your child worries about what might happen to his body in the future, remind him that a lot of the statistics are outdated and based on old medicine. Try not to use fear as a motivating tactic, says Wendy Satin Rapaport, PsyD, adjunct professor of medicine at the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Medical School. Telling a child that he could die or end up blind if he is lax about his treatment Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes Online Community

Children With Diabetes Online Community

We offer diabetes care suggestions based on the current state-of-the-art in caring for type 1 diabetes. Learn more about continuous glucose sensors and see Getting Started with Continuous Glucose Monitoring by Linda Mackowiak, MS, RN, CDE. The "Un-Tethered" Regimen by Dr. Steve Edelman offers pump users an alternative strategy by combining a pump with Lantus. Any child who was diagnosed in their first year of life should be screened for Kir6.2 Mutations. This mutation causes an extremely rare form of diabetes that can be treated with oral medication. To learn more, see Switching from Insulin to Oral Sulfonylureas in Patients with Diabetes Due to Kir6.2 Mutations . Families in the US should contact Dr. Louis Philipson at the University of Chicago . More information is available at www.diabetesgenes.org . Learn about Type 2 and Double Diabetes in kids. Let me begin by saying that when I'm stressed, it tends to work it's way to my stomach. When my son was diagnosed at 3, the doctor was sitting on the bed next to him, having a very big boy discussion about what diabetes was. The doctor said, "Can you say it? Can you say DI-A-BE-TES?" My son looked at him for a moment, very seriously, and said, "My mommy has DI-A-RHE-A". You know you're the parent of a child with diabetes when ... ... you go out to dinner and your child accidentally asks for A1C sauce for his steak instead of A1 sauce. Breakthrough: Elizabeth Hughes, the Discovery of Insulin, and the Making of a Medical Miracle by Thea Cooper and Arthur Ainsberg. Published by St. Martin's Press, 2010. ISBN 978-0-312-64870-1. Hardcover, 306 pages. US$24.99. As the parent of a child (now adult) with type 1 diabetes, there is no greater story to be told than that of the discovery of insulin. Breakthrough offers a new, richly d Continue reading >>

Finding Support: For Parents Of Children With Diabetes

Finding Support: For Parents Of Children With Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that affects the whole family, especially when a child is diagnosed. Whether your child was just diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes or you're entering a new life stage or experience with diabetes, everyone needs some emotional support now and then. The memory of the moment of diabetes diagnosis is a profound one. Psychologists call it a 'flashbulb' memory, in which you can recall all the exact elements of the moment you heard the news, with startling clarity. Parents often go through a grieving process when they find out that their child has diabetes. It can be difficult to come to terms with the idea that a child has a chronic condition that will need to be managed for the rest of his or her life. It's normal to feel grief and sadness. Many parents also feel guilty and wonder if they could have prevented diabetes somehow. Some parents also might feel unsure about taking on the tasks of caring for a child with diabetes, such as administering medications and helping their child follow a meal plan. Other common concerns from parents of children with diabetes are medical care and costs, how to manage diabetes at school or daycare, how to manage diabetes during holidays and special occasions, how to prepare for camps and sleepovers, finding a babysitter and what to do on sick days. The diabetes diagnosis can cause a grieving for your child’s lost health, in the same way as you may grieve for a lost loved one. It is a natural human tendency to live life rarely thinking about our health or mortality. It is not until something life changing happens that you suddenly become hyper-aware that no life is without its limits. Below are the stages of grief. You may not have experienced all of these emotions towards diabetes, or in this particular order. Stage 1: D Continue reading >>

[full Text] Supporting Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Litera | Pi

[full Text] Supporting Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Litera | Pi

Editor who approved publication: Dr Johnny Chen 1Graduate School, Gordon College of Education, 2Department of Nursing, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel Abstract: This review provides the reader with an integrative view of the literature on the challenges families of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus face, and the interventions proposed in research and practice to facilitate their coping and efficacy in supporting patient care. We present background information regarding the condition and the general challenges it poses, and then focus on younger patients and their families, while reviewing the literature and emerging patterns describing pitfalls and proposed interventions. We present directions for future thought and further research based on what we find (and fail to find) in the literature. Keywords: challenges, interventions, patient care, blood sugar, emotional, psychological Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a condition affecting younger patients, challenging them with life-threatening outcomes. The condition requires that patients adopt a restrictive lifestyle and diet, and monitor their blood sugar levels frequently. The young patients, naturally, must rely on their parents and families for instruction, support, and daily help with coping with such a complex set of demands. Moreover, beyond the challenges of daily care and monitoring, living with the constant threat of health deterioration and future complications, the young patients face emotional and psychological difficulties that reflect on their own coping as well as their social circle and family. The condition may therefore be considered a family condition challenging the patients entire social and familial circle in numerous ways. While the literature is replete with medical aspects of diagnosis Continue reading >>

More in diabetes