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Type 1 Diabetes Facts

Diabetes: Basic Facts

Diabetes: Basic Facts

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects the way the body turns sugar into energy. There are several types of diabetes. How the Body Turns Sugar into Energy The food we eat is made up of three things. They are carbohydrates (CAR-bow-HIdrates), which are sugars and starches; protein (PRO-teen); and fat. When we eat, a healthy body changes all of the carbohydrates and some of the protein and fat into a sugar. This sugar is called glucose (GLOOcose). From the small intestine, glucose moves into the blood. From the blood, glucose then moves into the cells of the body. The sugar we call glucose is the fuel, or energy, that the cells of the body need to do their work. Near the stomach is an organ called the pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas makes insulin (IN-suh-lin). Insulin is a hormone. When we eat, the sugar level in the blood goes up. The pancreas puts out more insulin. The insulin helps move the sugar out of the blood into the cells. The cells use the sugar for energy or store the sugar for use later. What happens when you have diabetes? When you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or doesn’t use the insulin properly. Sugar stays in your blood. Then the cells don’t get enough sugar for fuel. The body doesn’t have enough energy to do its work. Over time, the high level of sugar in the blood can damage the body. What are the types of diabetes? Three types of diabetes are the most common. Type 1 diabetes In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Sugar is unable to get into the cells. So the sugar level in the blood goes up. When the sugar level rises above normal, a person has high blood glucose. The name for high blood glucose is hyperglycemia (HIper-glice-EE-mee-uh). Most often children and young adults get Typ Continue reading >>

T1d Facts And Myths

T1d Facts And Myths

Myth: T1D is caused by eating too much sugar or being obese. Fact: Sugar intake and obesity have nothing to do with the onset of T1D. While we still do not know exactly what triggers the onset of T1D, scientists believe that both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Myth: Only children are diagnosed with T1D. Fact: While children are the age group most frequently associated with T1D, formerly called “juvenile diabetes,” it is regularly diagnosed in teens, young adults and adults. You can develop T1D at any age. Myth: You can cure T1D by taking insulin. Fact: Taking insulin keeps people with T1D alive, but it is not a cure. Myth: People with diabetes can’t or shouldn’t eat sugar or sweets. Fact: While limiting sugar intake can be a part of a healthy diet, people with T1D can work sugars and sweets into their diets just like a person without T1D. Sometimes sugar is necessary. If a person’s blood-sugar level drops too much, sugar, often in the form of juice or glucose tables, is required to raise it and correct hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Myth: Women with T1D shouldn’t get pregnant. Fact: Women with T1D regularly have healthy pregnancies and deliver healthy babies with planning and support. Myth: T1D is contagious. Fact: T1D is not contagious. T1D does not spread from person to person, but families with a history of autoimmune diseases may have more than one family member with T1D. Myth: People with T1D will go blind. Fact: While some people with T1D have complications, many live with T1D for decades without any complications. Every person is different and some are more genetically predisposed to complications, but optimal control of blood sugar is proven to significantly lower the risk of complications. Myth: You can cure T1D with diet and exerc Continue reading >>

10 Facts You May Not Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Facts You May Not Know About Type 1 Diabetes

1. Type 1 diabetes develops when a patient’s immune system mysteriously destroys pancreatic cells that make the hormone insulin, which regulates blood sugar and helps cells use the sugar glucose for energy. 2. Type 1 Diabetes is the second most common chronic illness in children, behind asthma. 3. Cases of Type 1 diabetes are increasing worldwide, particularly in young children. 4. Warning signs can include extreme thirst, frequent urination, a fruity breath odor and blurred vision. Generalized symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, stomachache, appetite changes and weight loss can also be indicators. 5. Kids are often misdiagnosed with viruses, acid reflux, strep throat, sinus or urinary tract infections. 6. Left untreated, kids are at risk for a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA develops when glucose-starved cells trigger a process that makes blood more acidic. 7. Type 1 Diabetes almost always appears before age 40. Half of patients are diagnosed by 18. 8. By 2050 in the United States, cases in children and teenagers are predicted to more than triple, with the average age of diagnosis apparently increasing. 9. In Philadelphia, Pa, the incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children younger than 5 has more than double since 1985. 10. Type 1 Diabetes’ mortality rate is highest in babies, toddlers, and preschoolers, due to delayed diagnoses and greater vulnerability to dehydration. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

happens when your immune system destroys cells in your pancreas called beta cells. They’re the ones that make insulin. Some people get a condition called secondary diabetes. It’s similar to type 1, except the immune system doesn’t destroy your beta cells. They’re wiped out by something else, like a disease or an injury to your pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that helps move sugar, or glucose, into your body's tissues. Cells use it as fuel. Damage to beta cells from type 1 diabetes throws the process off. Glucose doesn’t move into your cells because insulin isn’t there to do it. Instead it builds up in your blood and your cells starve. This causes high blood sugar, which can lead to: Dehydration. When there’s extra sugar in your blood, you pee more. That’s your body’s way of getting rid of it. A large amount of water goes out with that urine, causing your body to dry out. Weight loss. The glucose that goes out when you pee takes calories with it. That’s why many people with high blood sugar lose weight. Dehydration also plays a part. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). If your body can't get enough glucose for fuel, it breaks down fat cells instead. This creates chemicals called ketones. Your liver releases the sugar it stores to help out. But your body can’t use it without insulin, so it builds up in your blood, along with the acidic ketones. This combination of extra glucose, dehydration, and acid buildup is known as "ketoacidosis" and can be life-threatening if not treated right away. Damage to your body. Over time, high glucose levels in your blood can harm the nerves and small blood vessels in your eyes, kidneys, and heart. They can also make you more likely to get hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, which can lead to heart attacks and strok Continue reading >>

Reporting Severe Hypoglycemia In Type 1 Diabetes: Facts And Pitfalls

Reporting Severe Hypoglycemia In Type 1 Diabetes: Facts And Pitfalls

Abstract To describe potential factors influencing reporting of severe hypoglycemia in adult patients with type 1 diabetes and to analyze their effect on reported rates of severe hypoglycemia. Reported rates of severe hypoglycemia defined as need for third party assistance vary between 0.3–3.0 events per patient-year in unselected cohorts, corresponding to a yearly prevalence range of 10–53%. When defined as need for parenteral therapy with glucose or glucagon or need for admission to an emergency unit or hospitalization, incidence and prevalence rates of severe hypoglycemia are 0.02–0.5 events per patient-year and 1–29%, respectively. When subjects with recurrent severe hypoglycemia in the past or suffering from impaired hypoglycemia awareness are excluded from participation in studies, lower rates are reported. Studies applying anonymous reporting or reporting by partners report higher rates of severe hypoglycemia. There is a large variation between studies reporting incidence and prevalence of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes, mainly explained by definition of severity, methods of reporting, and patient selection. These findings call for consensus about hypoglycemia definition and reporting in future research. Notes Ulrik Pedersen-Bjergaard has served on advisory boards for AstraZeneca/Bristol-Myers Squibb, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi-Aventis, and has received lecture fees from AstraZeneca/Bristol-Myers Squibb, Medtronic, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi-Aventis. Birger Thorsteinsson served on advisory boards for Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly. The authors declare no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work. This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the aut Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

The incidence of type 1 diabetes is growing at an alarming rate. View the latest figures and links to national public information resources below. Quick facts Approximately 400,000 people are currently living with type 1 diabetes in the UK, with over 29,000 of them children Incidence is increasing by about four per cent each year, particularly in children under five, with a five percent increase each year in this age group over the last 20 years Type 1 diabetes affects 97 per cent of all children with diabetes in England 90 per cent of people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have no family history of the condition Although it used to be referred to as ‘juvenile diabetes’, around half of newly diagnosed cases are in people over the age of 18 The UK has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world, for reasons that are currently unknown A person with type 1 diabetes will have around 65,000 injections and measure their blood glucose over 80,000 times in their lifetime Public information resources National Diabetes Audit – One of the largest annual clinical audits in the world. It measures the effectiveness of diabetes care against National Institute of Clinical Excellence clinical guidelines and quality standards. Quality and Outcomes Framework – This is the annual programme that details GP practice achievement results and rewards practices for the achievement of quality care. The QOF awards practices achievement points for managing some of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes being one. Continue reading >>

Statistics On Type 1 Diabetes

Statistics On Type 1 Diabetes

Knowing the facts and statistics on type 1 diabetes helps patients differentiate the forms of the condition. It’s important to understand the basics of the condition in order to pinpoint symptoms and determine the best treatment plan. These are some of the facts on type 1 diabetes: • Diabetes affects nearly 25 million people in the US. • Type 1 diabetes accounts for only 5-10% of these cases. • Symptoms occur suddenly and cannot be prevented. • Doctors do not know what causes the immune system to attack the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. • Most patients with type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections (or wear an ‘insulin pump’) everyday for life to manage the condition. • It usually develops in children and young adults, but can happen at any age. • A cure is not known. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes

Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes

(Photo Credit: Josie Nicole) Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes is one of the most misunderstood diseases, and it accounts for 5-10% of all diabetes cases. Not many people understand the complexity or severity unless personally affected by it. Much of the stigma surrounding diabetes is brought on by myths and misconceptions. But as the prevalence is increasing worldwide, it’s important to debunk many of these myths and share the facts about Type 1 Diabetes. MYTH: Type 1 Diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar – FACT: Type 1 Diabetes occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. There is no known cause but it’s believed that genes and environmental factors play a role. MYTH: People with Type 1 Diabetes can be cured with diet and exercise – FACT: There is no cure for Type 1 Diabetes (YET). Yes, diet and exercise is beneficial for anyone including those managing diabetes, but it can not treat nor reverse it. MYTH: Sugar is off limits with Type 1 Diabetes – FACT: People with Type 1 Diabetes are not limited to what they can eat. Insulin is administered to cover the carbs or sugar they eat. Too much sugar is bad for everyone, but moderation is key. Sugar is also needed and life-saving for diabetics with low blood sugar. MYTH: If it’s sugar-free then it’s okay for Type 1 Diabetics to go ahead and consume – FACT: Actually, many sugar-free foods are loaded with carbohydrates. In many cases where they have more carbohydrates than a product just made with pure sugar. It’s always important to check nutrition labels because product packaging can be deceiving. MYTH: You won’t get Type 1 Diabetes if you live a healthy and active lifestyle – FACT: Type 1 Diabetes is not caused by ones’ lifesty Continue reading >>

The Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

The Facts About Type 1 Diabetes

WHAT IS TYPE 1 DIABETES? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s immune system damages the pancreas so that it can’t make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps blood sugar (glucose) get into the cells of the body to be used as fuel. When glucose can’t enter the cells, it builds up in the blood, causing high blood sugar. High blood sugar can cause problems with blood vessels, nerves, eyes, kidneys, the heart and other areas of the body. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT Type 1 diabetes often appears suddenly. In children, type 1 diabetes symptoms may be similar to the flu. Symptoms can include unusual thirst, frequent urination, extreme hunger yet with weight loss, loss of appetite, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting. Diagnosis is usually done with a blood test. Children with type 1 diabetes must have multiple daily injections of insulin to keep the blood glucose level within normal ranges. Insulin is given either by injection or insulin pump. Treatment also includes eating the right foods at the right time to manage blood sugar, and regular blood testing to check glucose levels. “Type 1 diabetes is a long-term, chronic condition, with potential, though rare, fatal consequences if not managed regularly,” CHOC Children’s endocrinologist Dr. Mark Daniels says. “An endocrinologist can help a child and his or her family come to terms with the disease and find ways to fit it into their lives.” TYPE 1 VS. TYPE 2 Only 5 percent of all people with diabetes have type 1. The remainder have another kind called type 2 diabetes, which is much more common in adults. While type 1 diabetes occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin, type 2 diabetes occurs when the body isn’t able to use insulin properly, even when it is present. Type 1 di Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 1 diabetes can also be called insulin-dependent diabetes because people with type 1 must take insulin in order to live. Type 1 diabetes used to be called juvenile diabetes because it was diagnosed mainly in children. However, that name is no longer accurate because children are increasingly developing another type of diabetes—type 2 diabetes. Also, it is possible for adults to be diagnosed as type 1, so the name “juvenile diabetes” isn’t accurate. Researchers aren’t exactly sure what causes type 1 diabetes, although they have some clues, including genetics and environmental triggers. Researchers have noticed that more cases of type 1 diabetes are diagnosed in northern climates, leading them to suggest that environmental triggers play a role in the development of type 1. Specifically, viral infections (which happen more often in colder northern climates where people are in close proximity) may trigger type 1. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2: about 90% of people with diabetes have type 2. With tight blood glucose control, you can avoid many of the short- and long-term complications associated with type 1 diabetes, including foot problems and nerve pain. Exercise is an important part of keeping diabetes under control. Many famous people have type 1 diabetes, including: Jay Cutler (quarterback for the Chicago Bears), Billie Jean King, Ron Santo (Chicago Cubs player), Halle Berry, Mary Tyler Moore, and Nick Jonas. Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the US population have diabetes. T Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes And Insulin

Facts About Diabetes And Insulin

Diabetes is a very common disease, which, if not treated, can be very dangerous. There are two types of diabetes. They were once called juvenile-onset diabetes and adult diabetes. However, today we know that all ages can get both types so they are simply called type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1, which occurs in approximately 10 percent of all cases, is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system, by mistake, attacks its own insulin-producing cells so that insufficient amounts of insulin are produced - or no insulin at all. Type 1 affects predominantly young people and usually makes its debut before the age of 30, and most frequently between the ages of 10 and 14. Type 2, which makes up the remaining 90 percent of diabetes cases, commonly affects patients during the second half of their lives. The cells of the body no longer react to insulin as they should. This is called insulin resistance. In the early 1920s, Frederick Banting, John Macleod, George Best and Bertram Collip isolated the hormone insulin and purified it so that it could be administered to humans. This was a major breakthrough in the treatment of diabetes type 1. Insulin Insulin is a hormone. Hormones are chemical substances that regulate the cells of the body and are produced by special glands. The hormone insulin is a main regulator of the glucose (sugar) levels in the blood. Insulin is produced in the pancreas. To be more specific, it's produced by the beta cells in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. When we eat, glucose levels rise, and insulin is released into the bloodstream. The insulin acts like a key, opening up cells so they can take in the sugar and use it as an energy source. Sugar is one of the top energy sources for the body. The body gets it in many forms, but mainly as carbohydr Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Facts About Diabetes

5 Surprising Facts About Diabetes

"Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children after asthma, but the percentage of kids who have it is still relatively low," says Parents advisor Lori Laffel, MD, chief of the pediatric, adolescent, and young-adult section at Harvard's Joslin Diabetes Center. Here are five important truths about this serious illness. Fact: Most Children Who Get Diabetes Aren't Fat Type 2 diabetes, which is usually triggered by obesity, has gotten a lot of press because it used to strike only adults and is now being diagnosed in kids as young as 6, says Dr. Laffel. Alarming as that is, a greater number of kids get type 1, an autoimmune disease that's been rising 4 percent a year since the 1970s -- especially in young kids. Only 3,700 children are diagnosed with type 2 every year compared with 15,000 who develop type 1, according to a large study that provides the first detailed look at diabetes in U.S. kids. In many ways, the two forms of diabetes are very different. In type 1, which has no known cause, the immune system mistakenly destroys healthy cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, the hormone that helps the body get energy from food. To make up for the shortfall, children typically need injections of insulin several times a day. In type 2, the pancreas usually makes plenty of insulin (at least at first), but cells throughout the body have trouble using it -- a condition known as insulin resistance. But no matter what the type, diabetes causes high blood-sugar levels when glucose from food -- the body's equivalent of gasoline for a car -- builds up because it can't get into cells without insulin. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage organs and tissues throughout the body. Fact: White Children Are at the Highest Risk Many people have heard that diabetes is Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key facts The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is charact Continue reading >>

> Diabetes Facts And Myths

> Diabetes Facts And Myths

It's important to educate yourself about diabetes so you can help your child manage it. This means arming yourself with the right information. Although the Internet has a wealth of content on diabetes, it's not always accurate. Information that's not interpreted correctly, or is inaccurate or misleading, can actually be harmful for someone with diabetes. Even well-meaning family members and friends can give bad information. Talk to your diabetes health care team when you see information that doesn't seem quite right, sounds too good to be true, or contradicts what they've told you. Never make changes to your child's diabetes management plan without contacting someone on the health care team first. Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Fact: Type 1 diabetes is caused by a destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, which is unrelated to sugar consumption. Type 2 diabetes results from the body's inability to respond to insulin normally. Although the tendency to get type 2 diabetes is genetically inherited in most cases, eating too much sugar (or foods with sugar, like candy or regular soda) can cause weight gain, which can increase the risk for developing the disease. Myth: Kids with diabetes can never eat sweets. Fact: Kids with diabetes can eat a certain amount of sugary food as part of a balanced diet, but they need to control the total amount of carbohydrates they eat, which includes sugary treats. Because sweets provide no real nutritional value other than calories, they should be limited — but not necessarily eliminated. All kids (and adults!) should avoid excessive consumption of foods that provide little nutritional value and can crowd out healthier foods. Fact: Kids do not outgrow diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the cells of the pancreas th Continue reading >>

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