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Type 1 Diabetes Emergency Kit

Emergency Preparedness: Diabetes Emergency Kit

Emergency Preparedness: Diabetes Emergency Kit

Recently, Hurricane Harvey has disastrously impacted Texas, including individuals with chronic medical conditions and disabilities. One man in particular recently shared his story of escaping the hurricane and wading through dangerous waters to retrieve his diabetes medications. When disaster strikes whether it be a hurricane, earthquake, power outage or other emergency situation, preparedness is key. It’s important to become educated on the potential consequences of disaster situations as well as developing an emergency kit and disaster plan. We recommend organizing a minimum of 7 days worth of supplies for a disaster situation for yourself and all the members of your family including pets. Develop an Emergency Plan Develop a comprehensive plan for emergency situations. Some important factors to consider: Communication Plan: How will you connect with family, friends, and doctors? Disaster Plan: Determine safe places in your home, family meeting spots, and what you’ll do if disaster strikes. Make a disaster kit: Include all the items you’ll need in the event of an emergency. Continuing reading to see our full list! Prepare to Stay and to Evacuate When developing your emergency kit and plan, it’s important to consider two main scenarios. Firstly, you may be trapped in your home for an extended period of time. Do you have enough supplies in place in the event you’re unable to travel to a store? What if stores are out of supplies? Do you have everything you would need to stay in your home for an extended period of time? Particularly consider you should pay special attention to what you would need if you didn’t have power or running water in your home. Secondly, consider the items that you would need to take with you if you were forced to evacuate. How are you g Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Diabetes Emergency Kit

Children With Diabetes - Diabetes Emergency Kit

There are many kinds of emergency situations that might present challenges to people with diabetes. Weather-related emergencies are the most common. In the winter, ice storms often knock out power. In the spring and summer, tornados, electrical storms, and hurricanes can cause serious damage. It makes sense for everyone with diabetes to have a diabetes emergency pack of supplies on hand, just in case. Here are some items that you might want to consider for your emergency kit: A good cold storage container with pre-made ice, in case of loss of electricity for a short period. A FRIO cooling pack to protect your insulin. FRIO packs do not need ice. Flashlights with many sets of extra batteries. Candles and matches to light the candles, in case the power outage outlasts the flashlight batteries. Extra glucose meter, extra insulin(s), glucagon, syringes, lancets, blood test strips, ketone test strips (blood or urine), alcohol wipes, insulin pump supplies (if you use a pump), CGM supplies, as well as non-diabetes medications such as anti-diarrhea medicine, anti-nausea medicine ( Zofran ODT is highly recommended), and pain medicine. Be sure to replenish these supplies frequently so that all supplies are within their use date. Consider storing a minimum of two weeks worth of supplies. Put this all in a waterproof sandwich bag or container. Emergency glucose to treat hypoglycemia . Unopened packages of glucose tablets are good for a very long time. Also know about Mini-Dose Glucagon Rescue for Hypoglycemia . A general first aid kit with bandages, etc. A spare battery for your blood test meter and insulin pump, if needed. For rechargeable devices, consider a mobile phone power pack -- just be sure to keep it charged. A current explanation of your diabetes management regimen, inc Continue reading >>

Tips For Emergency Preparedness

Tips For Emergency Preparedness

We have always needed to be ready for emergencies. Wherever you live, there is the chance of something happening to disrupt your daily life, whether it's a hurricane, an earthquake, a tornado, or a blizzard. Recent concerns about terrorist attacks have simply increased our awareness of the need to be prepared if a disaster strikes. Everyone is now advised to have a plan in place in the case of an emergency, and people with diabetes must consider proper diabetes care when they make emergency plans. Consider storingthree days worth of diabetes supplies, which, depending on how you take care of your diabetes, could include oral medication, insulin, insulin delivery supplies, lancets, extra batteries for your meter and/or pump, and a quick-acting source of glucose. You may also want to have an extra glucagon emergency kit. All these items should be kept in an easy-to-identify container, and stored in a location that is easy to get to in an emergency. Your emergency supply kit should also contain a list of emergency contacts and, if you are a parent of a child in school or daycare, physician's orders that may be on file with your child's school or day care provider. As always, it is a good idea to wear medical identification that will enable colleagues, school staff members, or emergency medical personnel to identify and address your medical needs. If you are a parent of a child with diabetes, it is important that your child's school has clearly identified the school staff members who will assist your child in the event of an emergency evacuation. For those who are away from home, consider informing your colleagues, friends, and family members about your diabetes and where your emergency supply kit is kept. Taking a few minutes right now to gather supplies and inform those Continue reading >>

Emergency Preparedness For Type 1 Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness For Type 1 Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness for Type 1 Diabetes From the wrath of Hurricane Sandy along the eastern seaboard to devastating wildfires in the west, the past two years have shattered previous records for natural disaster destruction in the United States. The hardships and chaos these catastrophes cause are difficult enough. But factor in the added demands of managing type 1 diabetes (T1D), and a bad situation can get much worse. No matter where you live, you should have a plan for taking care of yourself and your diabetes in an emergency situation. Kim Kaar lives in southeastern Connecticut with her husband Marko and their three childrenEmily, 18, Gabriel, 10, and Alex, 14, who was diagnosed with T1D at eighteen months of age. Just blocks from Long Island Sound in one direction, and the Connecticut River in the other, the Kaar family has ridden out their fair share of storms over the years. Possessing a mentality of always be prepared has made it fairly easy to keep type 1 diabetes care consistent, Kim explains. Despite the challenges of two hurricanes and a major blizzard over the past two years, advance planning and a well-stocked diabetes emergency kit has kept Alexs T1D safely in check through flooding and extended electrical power loss. But the Kaars may be in the minority. Even though it is something that I always talk to them about, before Superstorm Sandy hit last year, most of my patients did not have realistic emergency plans in place, laments New York-based diabetes educator Susan Weiner, RD, MS, CDE. People just dont think it will happen to themuntil it happens to them. Organization and checklists are key to making it through an emergency, according to Mrs. Weiner, author of the upcoming book The Complete Diabetes Organizer (Spry Publishing, Fall 2013). Think thro Continue reading >>

What To Pack In Your Diabetes Emergency Kit

What To Pack In Your Diabetes Emergency Kit

No matter the season, Mother Nature can wreak havoc in our lives. Other emergencies can turn our world upside down. For those people with type 1 diabetes, always being prepared is essential. Below is a list of things that should be in your diabetes emergency kit. Excerpted from Kids First, Diabetes Second by Leighann Calentineand published by Spry Publishing; available wherever books are sold. Diabetes Preparedness Kit My daughter with type 1 diabetes, Quinn, learned about “preparedness” at school and had the idea to make a diabetes preparedness kit at home. Every part of the country has some type of severe weather, and you need to be prepared in case you have to take shelter or leave the house quickly. I’m not sure why I hadn’t thought of this before. In the past when we heard tornado sirens, I swooped up some supplies and ran downstairs. Now we have a kit stocked with everything we might need (except insulin), and I keep it in the pantry where we take cover. We store insulin in the refrigerator because it needs to be kept cool, but we can quickly grab it if needed. Keep your kit in a designated spot so that it can be grabbed quickly, and don’t forget to rotate any supplies that might expire. The plastic container we purchased has two interlocking tiers. The diabetes supplies are in the top tier, and bottled water and snacks are in the bottom. We also take the kit with us when we travel or go camping, or when Quinn has a sleepover at her grandparents’ house. Diabetes Preparedness Kit (Tailor to the supplies that you use.) Plastic container, ideally with a handle so that it’s portable Blood glucose meter Blood glucose test strips Blood ketone meter and blood ketone strips OR urine ketone strips Lancing device Lancets Alcohol swabs Syringes (for both MDI an Continue reading >>

Emergency Diabetes Food Kit | Medical - Diabetes | Pinterest | Diabetes Food, Diabetes And Natural Living

Emergency Diabetes Food Kit | Medical - Diabetes | Pinterest | Diabetes Food, Diabetes And Natural Living

Zombie Squad Diabetes Bug Out Bag and Camping Kit When disaster strikes, having a diabetes emergency action plan is key. Stay safe during and after a storm or other unforeseen urgent situations by making an emergency "go" bag with essential diabetes supplies. {Diabetes at School} Low Blood Sugar Classroom Kits When disaster strikes, having a diabetes emergency action plan is key. Stay safe during and after a storm or other unforeseen urgent situations by making an emergency "go" bag with essential diabetes supplies. Diabetes emergency kit - everyone in Memphis needs one of these. Big Diabetes Free - Simple snacks for Diabetics! Easy combinations that are healthy and delicious. - Doctors reverse type 2 diabetes in three weeks DiabetesMine reports on a new "consensus statement" on exercise management in type 1 diabetes -- the first-ever medical guidelines on this health challenge. Top 10 Type 1 Diabetes Memes (excuse the bad language in this pic) Sample School Kits for Diabetes: Shows what to have for each individual classroom The Effects of Insulin on the Body. Someone with diabetes makes me proud every Type I diabetes is a very severe disease. The average life-span of a type 1 diabetic is years shorter than an average person. t betes be 3 ba. e 0 U from traveling Dont let dia stoD BEFO YOU LEAVE Visit your doctor Discuss your travel . One of my favorite adaptogenic herbs. Holy Basil Benefits Holy Basil is great for reducing depression, stress and anxiety. It promotes health and wellbeing and protects the mind and body in a very positive way. Continue reading >>

11 Items Every Diabetic Emergency Kit Must Have

11 Items Every Diabetic Emergency Kit Must Have

11 Items Every Diabetic Emergency Kit Must Have 11 Items Every Diabetic Emergency Kit Must Have Be prepared to take care of your health if disaster strikes. Jenilee Matz has a masters degree in public health and worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a health communications specialist. She writes for several health publications including Everyday Health, HealthDay, and Diabetic Connect. Unexpected emergencies are a part of life. Natural disasters such as tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, and blizzards can happen almost anywhere. Acts of terrorism also occur and could send your daily routine into turmoil. Then, after the horrible event ends, you'll face another battle . There's a chance you could be stranded in your home without power or away from your home for days, weeks, or even months. If you dont have access to your medication, blood sugar testing supplies , and other necessities, youll face a medical emergency. Its crucial for you to be ready for an emergency . Taking the time to prepare now can save your life in the future. The American Diabetes Association suggests stocking up on enough diabetes supplies to last for at least three days. Store these items in a waterproof, insulated container thats easy to carry. Tell your family and friends where the kit is located in your home in case youre unable to get to it. Its a good idea to stock regular safety itemssuch as flashlights, batteries, and first aid suppliesnear your diabetes care kit. Fill up your kit with the following supplies Insulin and syringes or insulin pump and supplies. Even if you use an insulin pump, keep syringes on hand in case your pump is damaged or malfunctions, so you are still covered in an emergency. Medication including oral diabetes meds and any other prescrip Continue reading >>

Emergency Preparedness For Diabetes

Emergency Preparedness For Diabetes

For people who have diabetes, the ongoing situation in the Gulf Coast being wrought by Hurricane Harvey has an added level of complexity. According to Dr. Elizabeth Halprin, an endocrinologist at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, “Diabetes is a difficult, chronic disease to live with and those who have evacuated their homes in the Houston area as a result of Hurricane Harvey are faced with continuing the day-to-day management of diabetes despite the catastrophic situation they are faced with. A lack of supplies combined with the flooding of hospitals and pharmacies puts the diabetic population at high risk in Houston. Victims of the flooding may be without an adequate supply of insulin or in shelters without electricity to refrigerate their insulin, which can be fatal for someone with Type 1 diabetes. Increased stress can cause an elevation in blood glucose levels, which, coupled with a lack of proper drinking water can be very dangerous. Increased physical activity can also cause a drop in blood glucose levels, and without adequate diabetes-friendly foods to counteract that, there is a high risk of severe hypoglycemic events. It will be up to pharmacies, hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, and all members of the community to ensure that patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes have what they need to stay out of danger.” What can you do to ensure you’re prepared if a disaster strikes your area? According to experts, packing a diabetes emergency kit ahead of time is key. The kit should include items such as water, food, clothing and other gear that provides warmth, shelter and tools, lighting, means of communication, hygiene and first-aid items, and diabetes supplies. Lisa Katzki, RN, BSN, PHN, notes that some or all of the following medical supplies should Continue reading >>

What Does A Diabetes Emergency Kit Consist Of?

What Does A Diabetes Emergency Kit Consist Of?

What does a diabetes emergency kit consist of? What does a diabetes emergency kit consist of? Q:What does a diabetes emergency kit consist of? A diabetes emergency kit is mainly for people who take insulin or insulin-stimulating medications, whether they are living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The kit should include your insulin or medication; insulin delivery supplies; lancets; extra batteries for your meter, pump and/or continuous glucose monitoring device; glucose tablets; and a glucagon emergency kit. In addition, people with all types of diabetes should make sure to have a supply of bottled water, snacks and a first aid kit on hand for emergency situations, whether or not they take insulin or diabetes medication. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. What does a diabetes emergency kit consist of? The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, Content) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and dLife does not provide, professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. dLife does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, physicians, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on this site. Reliance on any information provided by dLife, its employees and other contributors or visitors to t Continue reading >>

What To Pack In Your Diabetes Emergency Bag

What To Pack In Your Diabetes Emergency Bag

Thinkstock Plan Ahead for Home and Away For people with diabetes, even a traffic jam can turn into a life-threatening emergency — which is why it’s so important to have an action plan in place, says Vandana Sheth, RDN, a certified diabetes educator in Southern California and a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The first step: Create a labeled, easy-to-grab emergency kit where you can stash your contact information, medications, testing supplies, food, water, and a source of glucose. The following tips will help you handle any diabetes emergency. Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Emergency Kit Essentials

10 Diabetes Emergency Kit Essentials

There are approximately 25 million people with diabetes living in the United States. While having a Diabetes emergency kit may not be something you think about often, having a few extra items stashed away in a safe place may mean the difference between life and death in the event of a natural disaster. Given the prevalence of major natural disasters around the country, there should also be enough diabetes supplies in your emergency kit to last at least three days. This should allow you to safely wait out the aftermath of an earthquake, hurricane or anything else that can impede your progress to your home or medical center. These supplies are going to vary depending on your particular condition and how you manage your diabetes, so be sure to create a diabetes emergency kit that is customized to your specific medical needs. Please feel free to add your thoughts and suggestions to the comments section and we will regularly update this list. 1.Extra bottles of insulin, medications, test strips and pump sites. Check with your insurance company about ordering your supplies in 60 or 90 day supplies. 2.Alcohol wipes. Prior to insulin injections it's important to sterilize the area. 3.Cooler. Use a cooler to store insulin and other medications. If you keep a stash of cool packs in the freezer these will keep your meds cool for up to 48 hours. Ice may not be the best option since it will melt much faster than a cool pack. 4.Flash light. If the power goes out a flash lightis essential. Having severalfully charged flash lightsstashedaround the houseis a much safer and longer lastingoption that candles. 5. Extra batteries. You never know when an extra battery may come in handly, but having several sizes available during an emergency could mean.... 6. Medical ID bracelet . Anyone wi Continue reading >>

What To Pack In A Diabetes Emergency Kit

What To Pack In A Diabetes Emergency Kit

Support and education for parents of children with type 1 diabetes, Sylvia White Dietitian and Diabetes Educator The recent hurricanes have reminded me we all need to be prepared for emergencies, but we as parents with kids with type 1 diabetes need to especially be prepared. An emergency kit of essential supplies is helpful to have packed and ready to go, for storms or even if its a family emergency where you have to leave town quickly and dont have as much time to think about what to take. Heres some things to pack in an emergency kit: Low Glucose Supplies: Treating lows is a priority. Always have glucose tabs or another source of fast acting glucose/sugar. Heres info on treating low blood sugar. Glucagon emergency kit is needed in a kit, but hopefully wont have to be used. Need help with how to use glucagon? Heres an app. Blood glucose meter, strips, lancing device, and lancets: I include several kits. If you need extra kits, provider offices usually have free ones, just ask. Make sure the batteries are working or have extra batteries. Ketone strips and/or ketone blood meter: You want to get a quick start on handling ketones and preventing DKA if blood sugars are running high so having ketone strips is important. Heres info on ketones. Pump and CGM supplies: always have more than you think you will need. These are hard to come by. Insulin: you wont want to pack this ahead since it needs to be cold, but I put a sticky note reminder to grab insulin in the kit. I keep freezer packs in the freezer so they are ready. Having the original box with the prescription can come in handy if it needs to be refilled somewhere out of town. A Frio bag is very handy to keep insulin cold without ice. Syringes or pen needles. Even if on a pump, always have back up syringes. Batteries o Continue reading >>

Tips On Creating A First-rate First-aid Kit

Tips On Creating A First-rate First-aid Kit

Tips on Creating a First-Rate First-Aid Kit What people with diabetes need to be prepared for emergencies When it comes to your health, preparing for the worst isnt pessimistic. Its smart. Thats why experts advise everyone to stash medical supplies for a rainy day. Or, you know, a day when youve just sliced your finger, sprained your ankle, or broken out in hives. A well-stocked first-aid kit is easy to prepare and useful in both minor and more serious emergencies. The bathroom may seem like the ideal spot to stash the essentials, but because of heat and humidity, its not the best place to keep medicine or many diabetes supplies. Instead, store your first-aid kit in a room where you spend a lot of time or in an easy-to-reach area of a closet. Creating your own kit is easy. Start with a waterproof container, then add the supplies listed ("In the Kit," below). As far as medications go, experts recommend adding baby aspirin to the mix, which can help during a heart attack. (After calling 911, chew four baby aspirin or one non-coated adult aspirin. Chewed aspirin works faster than swallowed pills.) Theres less of a consensus about other medications. Those that must be kept cold, such as insulin, dont need to be included. Others, such as cough syrup, ibuprofen, and antidiarrheal drugs, can be added to the mix. The tricky part is keeping items current. If youre going to put medications in there, anything that can potentially expire, you want to check that often, says David Berry, PhD, ATC, an athletic trainer, professor at Weber State University, and member of the American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council. He recommends reviewing the items in your first-aid kit at least twice a year and replacing anything that is expired. Also remember to refill the kit as you use items Continue reading >>

What To Put In Your Diabetes Emergency Kit

What To Put In Your Diabetes Emergency Kit

Emergencies happen suddenly. This is a stark realization as I breathe in ash from wildfires that have evacuated over 25,000 people in northern California. On this bike trip across the country, I rode into Sonoma County and met evacuees from towns like Santa Rosa. A message is repeated by all of those who had to flee – it all happened so rapidly So how can people with diabetes prepare themselves to be evacuation ready? You can use this article as a guide to create your own emergency kit. Make this a task to do today or this weekend. Once you are done, leave a comment sharing that you are prepared. How many supplies should be in your emergency kit? People with diabetes should be prepared with two weeks of medicine, food, and everything else you need. A to-go bag with all these supplies in one place is a good way to be prepared (the bottom of the article has a case study with specific quantities). Tell other family members, roommates, neighbors, or loved ones where this emergency to-go bag is located. You may be in a different spot when disaster hits. How to keep insulin cool without electricity Power outages are common during all seasons of the year from natural disasters. Spending three months in Ethiopia, where the power went out frequently, I can offer some tips to keep insulin cool when there is a blackout: Fill empty plastic bottles with water and keep them in your freezer. During a power outage, move these frozen bottles into the fridge to keep the temperature stable. This is only a temporary solution since the ice will eventually melt. Use a mini cooler with ice packs for medication like insulin. A member of the Facebook group “Type 1 Diabetic Athletes Group” recommends RTIC insulated coolers, which promotes keeping ice up to 10 days. Have a separate cooler f Continue reading >>

The On-the-go T1d Kit

The On-the-go T1d Kit

The “T1D On-The-Go Kit” is the extra back-up of supplies that you may need if your car breaks down or you’ve forgotten something when you’re on the go — it could be for a sporting event from home, in the car for your work commute, at the studio, gym or any other place you frequent. It is not intended for long duration emergency care that you find in the Natural Disaster Emergency Kit. This kit should go with you when you’re on the move and used in the event that you need something extra. Remember: Use any bag that is easy to identify, secure and has enough space to hold everything. You may consider getting a waterproof or insulated bag. It is a good idea to label your bag with name and medical ID as well as contact details. Consider getting a system like Tile to keep track of your bag and locate it in case it gets lost. Diabetes Travel Essentials The go-to device for testing your blood sugar levels. Insulin The American Diabetes Association recommends packing a 3-day supply. Include short-acting as well as long-acting insulin. When insulin is kept cool at the recommended temperature of 36° F – 46° F, it will last until its expiration date. Unrefrigerated insulin can be stored at a temperature between 59°F-86°F and may be effective up to 28 days. Don’t forget to rotate supplies so that your emergency kit does not contain expired products. A Cooler (Optional) Include 4 reusable ice packs to keep insulin cool. (FRIO makes insulin pouches that cool when submerged in water.) Never use insulin that has been frozen. Syringes and/ or Pen Needles Both deliver insulin; it depends on what’s your instrument of choice. If you are on a pump you should carry emergency needles and insulin vials, or an emergency pen in case of failure. Also, carry extra syringes fo Continue reading >>

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