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Type 1 Diabetes Disability Tax Credit 2016

T1international Calls For Financial Fairness For Canadians With Type 1 Diabetes

T1international Calls For Financial Fairness For Canadians With Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin was discovered in Canada, by Canadian researchers. It features proudly on their $100 bill. Despite this, many Canadians are struggling to afford the costs of insulin and other diabetes supplies. These costs run into the thousands of dollars per year. As T1International has detailed, insulin rationing is a harsh reality for people living in Canada. To offset growing diabetes costs, many use the Canadian Disability Tax Credit. Recent reports have indicated Disability Tax Credit is being denied to many Canadians with type 1 diabetes. Without clarification, Canadians with type 1 diabetes and their physicians are undergoing a lengthy application process only to find out that they no longer qualify. This is unacceptable. Our position is this: #insulin4all is a human right. We call upon the Government of Canada to clarify whether or not type 1 diabetes qualifies for the Disability Tax Credit program, and for the government to remove all unnecessary barriers to insulin and supply access for people with diabetes. We support calls for the creation of a national universal pharmacare program, a frequently stated priority of the Canadian government, and note such a program would render this entire debate moot. We applaud Diabetes Canada, JDRF Canada, MP Nathan Cullen, MP Andrew James Scheer, and all other organizations and individuals fighting upon behalf of Canadians living with type 1 diabetes. We are proud to add our voice to this chorus. We hope this debate ends up being an opportunity for the Prime Minister to further a #insulin4all agenda at home and abroad. Continue reading >>

Cra To Review Disability Tax Credit Applications After Backlash From Diabetics

Cra To Review Disability Tax Credit Applications After Backlash From Diabetics

After months of criticism and accusations it lied to disability advocates, the Canada Revenue Agency is reverting to a previous interpretation of a tax credit used by diabetics and will review applications denied since May 2017. Liberal MP Kamal Khera, the parliamentary secretary for the minister of national revenue, said the government is sorry for the confusion. "When there's an apology due we do apologize," Khera told CBC News Network's Power & Politics. When asked if something went wrong, she said yes. Since the spring, people with Type 1 diabetes have complained that they have been turned down for the disability tax credit — even if they had been approved in previous years. To qualify for the credit, the CRA requires adults with Type 1 diabetes to spend at least 14 hours a week on activities, specified by the agency, related to administering insulin. A patient's physician must confirm those hours to the CRA. Diabetes Canada and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation obtained an internal CRA memo, dated May 2, 2017, that says: "Unless there are exceptional circumstances, adults with diabetes can generally manage their daily insulin therapy without taking 14 hours per week." In a briefing with reporters Friday morning, officials said the CRA will return to using the pre-May 2017 clarification letter for disability tax applications, but reiterated that "no change has been made to the eligibility criteria." It will also proactively review denied applications where the CRA relied on that revised clarification letter to determine eligibility. The CRA says individuals do not need to submit new or additional information unless they are contacted by the agency. In the meantime, a new disability committee will come up with recommendations going forward. Advisory committ Continue reading >>

Cpa With Type 1 Diabetes Pleased With Cra Disability Tax Credit Reversal

Cpa With Type 1 Diabetes Pleased With Cra Disability Tax Credit Reversal

CPA with Type 1 diabetes pleased with CRA disability tax credit reversal Everett Colby of Colby McGeachy Professional Corporation explains the real cost of diabetes OTTAWA, Jan. 23, 2018 Chartered Professional Accountant Everett Colby, who lives with Type 1 diabetes, is happy with the Canada Revenue Agencys recent decision to return to the pre-May 2017 criteria on disability tax credit (DTC) applications. Kudos to whoever was lobbying on the unfairness of this. Its nice to see that [the CRA] can admit when something just isnt right, he says. Colby is a principal and tax, litigation and forensic accounting partner with Colby McGeachy Professional Corporation of Almonte, Ont. He has qualified for the DTC since 2004, applying on three-year intervals so the CRA can periodically review the restrictive nature of the disease as it affects him. He was previously covered until the end of the 2016 tax year, and recently had it renewed for six years, until 2022. I take insulin at least four times a day. I indicated the time as being 15 minutes per episode of having to take an injection, says Colby, who explains the difficult process involved in not just having to prepare the dosage, along with the swabbing and other tasks, but also the logistical difficulties with having to find some privacy. For example, if he is in a business meeting, that requires leaving the meeting to find a restroom. The same requirement applies to blood glucose monitoring, which also takes 15 minutes per occurrence about four times a day, adding up to another hour, for a total of at least two hours daily. With all of those things combined every day, its not difficult to get over the 14 required hours per week, stresses Colby. There are also significant financial costs involved with managing diabetes. Type Continue reading >>

Can I Get Disability For Diabetes?

Can I Get Disability For Diabetes?

Today, there are 11 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes. Every three minutes, another Canadian is diagnosed with the condition. Diabetes is a chronic, debilitating – and sometimes fatal – disease, where the body cannot produce an adequate amount of insulin for the body, or can’t correctly utilize the insulin it does produce. Insulin is a vital hormone that regulates blood-sugar levels. Without sufficient supply of insulin, a person risks damaged organs, blood vessels, and nerves. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the body’s immune system mistakenly attacking and killing beta cells in the pancreas. Since beta cells are responsible for distributing insulin into the blood via the pancreas, without their presence, sugar in the blood builds up rather than being used for energy. Type 1 diabetes is usually treated with insulin dosages; careful meal planning can also regulate blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce (called insulin insensitivity). This is the most common type of diabetes, affecting 90% of people with the disease. Depending on the severity, the condition can be managed through meal planning, physical activity, or medications. Diabetes has an array of signs and symptoms, the most common being: Unusual thirst Frequent urination Weight change Extreme fatigue / lack of energy Blurred vision Cuts and bruises that heal slowly Tingling or numbness in hands or feet It’s important to note that these are predominantly Type 1 diabetes symptoms; type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. Canadian Disability Tax Credit for Diabetes While people with diabetes can live an active, independent lifestyle, they’ll nee Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Qualify For Disability Tax Credit?

Does Diabetes Qualify For Disability Tax Credit?

Todd Korol/National Post Last week’s Family Finance column profiled a young couple, Tim and Kathleen, and mentioned that Tim’s disability and diabetes qualifies him to open a registered disability savings plan. Eligibility to open an RDSP is dependent on qualifying for the disability tax credit (DTC). That diabetes would entitle an individual to claim the DTC surprised some readers, who asked for clarification. Under the Income Tax Act, the DTC is available to people with a “severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions” which markedly restricts one or more of the individual’s basic activities of daily living or would markedly restrict an activity if it wasn’t for “life sustaining therapy.” Life-sustaining therapy is therapy that an individual requires to support a vital function and is administered at least three times per week for an average of at least 14 hours per week. The purpose of this rule is to allow individuals to be eligible for the DTC if they must have life-sustaining therapy that requires them to dedicate a significant amount of time away from their normal, everyday activities to receive the therapy. In 2005, the tax rules were amended to state that if the therapy has been determined to require a regular dosage of medication that needs to be adjusted on a daily basis, the activities directly involved in determining the appropriate dosage are considered part of the therapy. As a result of this change, a child with Type 1 diabetes who is unable to independently adjust his or her insulin dosage may now qualify for the DTC taking account into time spent by his or her parents in assisting the child to administer the insulin. Since the amendment passed, there have been at least two reported cases in which the CRA challenged the Continue reading >>

How To Fight For The Disability Tax Credit With Type 1 Diabetes

How To Fight For The Disability Tax Credit With Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Canada recently released a statement claiming that the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) is now declining 80% of applications for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) submitted by people living with type 1 diabetes. I cannot confirm or deny these figures. I can state that I am seeing a significant increase in the number of people contacting. They are reaching out because they or their clients have been declined for the DTC. What is going on with the DTC? No one seems to know. CRA claims that there has been no change in policy. Public concern seems to suggest otherwise. For years, people with diabetes have often received a follow-up letter when they have made their application asking for more details from their doctor. In the past, that letter was filled out in a similar manner to the initial application and the claim was approved. This seems to be happening with less frequency now. People living with diabetes are often receiving a letter stating that “an adult who independently manages insulin therapy on a regular basis generally does not meet the 14 hours per week requirement unless there are exceptional circumstances.”. In some cases this is followed by a request for more information but in other cases it is part of the denial for their claim. Does this mean that I should not apply? No. People living with diabetes usually spend over 14 hours per week to intensively manage their diabetes. Granted this does not include all people living with diabetes but does include a large majority. You should continue to send in your detailed applications. Make sure that you are adding tasks that are approved and that your total is over 14 hours. What happens after I apply for the DTC? Once you and your doctor have completed your forms and returned your application, there will be Continue reading >>

Moncton Man Among Growing Number Of Canadians With Diabetes Denied Disability Tax Credit

Moncton Man Among Growing Number Of Canadians With Diabetes Denied Disability Tax Credit

Moncton man among growing number of Canadians with diabetes denied disability tax credit By Shelley Steeves Senior Correspondent Global News Tue, Oct 31: A Moncton man with Type 1 diabetes is calling on the Canada Revenue Agency to make it easier for people with the disease to qualify for the disability tax credit. Shelley Steeves reports. A New Brunswick man with diabetes is calling on the Canada Revenue Agency to make it easier for people with the disease to qualify for the disability tax credit after his claim was denied. Kevin Dunphy says he was told his claim was rejected because I dont consume 14 hours a week taking care of my diabetes. READ MORE: Liberals hitting diabetes patients with tax grab, Conservatives and health groups say Dunphy was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes more than 35 years ago and tests his blood sugar levels and administers insulin at least four times every day to manage his disease. However, when he applied for the federal disability tax credit, the CRA did not consider the time he spends preparing health meals, exercising and managing his stress as life-sustaining therapy. According to Diabetes Canada, most disability tax credit claims made by Canadians with diabetes have been denied by the CRA in the last six months. About 80 to 90 per cent of adults with diabetes applying for this tax credit right now are being rejected and that is only happening since May, so it is a real concern, said Kim Hanson, the director of federal affairs for Diabetes Canada. Hanson says the the reasons for the recent spike in denials are still unclear but she believes some life choices being made by people with diabetes, such as time spent counting carbohydrates, are not being taken into consideration by Revenue Canada. WATCH:Conservatives accuse Liberals of targe Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit + The Price Of T1d In Canada

Disability Tax Credit + The Price Of T1d In Canada

WRITTEN BY: Jen Hanson Editor’s Note: this piece was originally published on the Connected In Motion Blog. Update: On December 4, 2017, Diabetes Canada and JDRF reported: “Internal CRA documents show intent to deny the disability tax credit to Canadians with type 1 diabetes.” Read below for ways to raise your voice in opposition. Outside of November (World Diabetes Month), it’s not that often that Type 1 diabetes hits the mainstream media. This past week though, if you’ve been anywhere near the TV news, talk radio, or a Facebook feed, you’ve probably heard that the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) has made drastic cuts in approvals of Disability Tax Credit applications for adults living with Type 1 diabetes. This has been done without any substantiated explanation or evidence to support that any Type 1 diabetes therapy requires fewer than 14 hours per week to manage – the standard being used for approval of the credit. The CRA denial documents claim that “the type of therapy indicated [in patient applications do] not meet the 14 hour per week criteria.” This, followed up by a letter from Revenue Minister Diane Lebouthillier outlining that the CRA believes that advances in technology (read: Insulin Pumps) have decreased the time needed by adults to care for for Type 1 diabetes. Perhaps the biggest insult to the Type 1 community is the fact that the CRA has decided that their evaluation of the care needed for Type 1 diabetes supersedes the recommendations of the medical community. Each applicant works with a medical professional to document the minutes and hours required for proper care. An application cannot be submitted without a signature from a medical professional (and, in most cases, follow-up communication with that medical professional to confirm th Continue reading >>

Tax Credits & Your Rights

Tax Credits & Your Rights

What is Diabetes Canada's position on tax credits for people living with diabetes? The Government of Canada should institute a system of enhanced tax credits wherein people with diabetes would be eligible for consideration for a non-refundable tax credit or a refundable payout specifically designed to reduce the burden of higher medical and treatment costs. The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) for Canadians with Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes may be eligible for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) if they meet the eligibility criteria for receiving a life-sustaining therapy. What are the eligibility criteria for the DTC? The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) must receive confirmation that the applicant spends at least 14 hours per week on the activities specified by the CRA (listed below) that are related to administering insulin. Who can apply for the DTC? Parents of children with type 1 diabetes Kids with type 1 diabetes under the age 18 years may be eligible for the DTC, as long as the child’s physician signs the T2201 Disability Tax Credit Certificate to certify that the eligibility criteria are met. Most kids under age 18 qualify for the DTC because the child and parent/guardian time can be combined to meet the 14 hour per week criteria. The CRA will require individuals to reapply when they turn age 18. Adults with type 1 diabetes Adults must discuss their eligibility with their doctor. Many adults with type 1 diabetes do not qualify for the DTC because the CRA has not received adequate information that they spend at least 14 hours per week on the activities specified by the CRA related to administering insulin. The CRA must receive confirmation from physicians that their patients who are applying for the DTC spend at least 14 hours per week on the activities. It may be h Continue reading >>

Canada Revenue (cra) Disability Tax Credit

Canada Revenue (cra) Disability Tax Credit

Canada Revenue (CRA) Disability Tax Credit Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Canada Revenue (CRA) Disability Tax Credit Hello..I went to my Doctor today to have him sign my request to receive the disability tax credit and he has refused to sign. He will sign it if I can prove to him that I take 2 hours per day to manage my diabetes (14 hr/wk). Can anyone help me out PLEASE! Can anyone provide a template for this type of request so that I can show my doctor on paper why I am still alive? CRA allows a tax credit to Life-sustaining therapy must meet the following conditions: The following points apply in determining the time your patient spends on therapy: Your patient must dedicate the time for the therapy - that is, the patient has to take time away from normal, everyday activities to receive it. If your patient receives therapy by a portable device, such as an insulin pump, or an implanted device, such as a pacemaker, the time the device takes to deliver the therapy does not count towards the 14-hour requirement. However, the time your patient spends setting up a portable device does count. Do not include activities such as following a dietary restriction or regime, exercising, travelling to receive the therapy, attending medical appointments (other than appointments where the therapy is received), shopping for medication, or recuperating after therapy. For 2005 and later years : If your patient's therapy requires a regular dosage of medication that needs to be adjusted daily, the activities directly related to determining and administering the dosage are considered part of the therapy (for example, monitoring blood glucose l Continue reading >>

Tax Deductions For Diabetes

Tax Deductions For Diabetes

The IRS allows you to claim a tax deduction for many of the expenses you incur to diagnose, monitor and treat diabetes. If you, your spouse or a dependent suffers from diabetes, it’s likely that you have more medical expenses than the typical person. Fortunately, the IRS allows you to claim a tax deduction for many of the expenses you incur to diagnose, monitor and treat diabetes. However, you must be eligible to itemize to claim the deduction, and even then, only a portion of the expense is deductible. Deductible portion of diabetes expenses Your total deduction for medical expenses, including all costs that relate to diabetes, are only deductible to the extent the total exceeds 7.5 percent of your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) for 2017 and 2018. Your AGI is not the same as your taxable income; rather it is your total income less specific types of deductions such as student-loan interest and IRA contributions that are separately listed on the first page of your tax return. To illustrate, suppose your AGI is $30,000. Multiplying this by 7.5 percent gives you $2,250. This means that when you total up all of the medical bills you pay during the year, only the portion that is more than $2,250 can be claimed as a deduction. For example, if your total medical expenses for diabetes and other health-related issues cost $3,800, you can claim a $1,550 deduction. Beginning Jan. 1, 2019, all taxpayers may deduct only the amount of the total unreimbursed allowable medical care expenses for the year that exceeds 10% of their adjusted gross income. Diabetes expenses you can include There are a wide range of expenses that you can include in your medical deduction including the purchase price of blood sugar monitoring kits, test strips, insulin and other medications prescribed by your Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit Help

Disability Tax Credit Help

Hi there i am new here and looking for some info on this tax credit.. my doctor called me today asking for some information so he can send out the forum for my disability tax credit and i have till friday to shot him a number on hours per week that are used on injection..glucose monitoring.. all that fun stuff.. also figuring out medication doses for food i am going to eat.. im hoping someone knows the minimum that are required to be eligible for this tax credit so i dont over shoot since i only have 1 day to figure it out... so if somone can tell me the requirements of hours needed spent on this stuff to be eligible can you let me know.. plz and thanks!!! Glucose monitoring: 1 minute per test at up to 10 tests a day (70 minutes/week) Injections: 1 minute per injection at up to 8 injections a day (56 minutes) Calculating doses for food: 30 seconds at up to 5 meals per day (17.5 minutes) Total time those things affect my ability to work: 0 hours/week Last edited by Triv; 9/10/16 at 12:19 PM. Reason: Moderated D.D. Family type 2 since January 27th, 2016 Glucose monitoring: 1 minute per test at up to 10 tests a day (70 minutes/week) Injections: 1 minute per injection at up to 8 injections a day (56 minutes) Calculating doses for food: 30 seconds at up to 5 meals per day (17.5 minutes) Total time those things affect my ability to work: 0 hours/week disabled. I would bet the majority of diabetics are fully capable of working just fine. Some, like my uncle, should have gotten disability. But he didn't get his approval letter in the mail until the day he was taken off of life support. He worked full time plus hours up to the day before he died. So unless you have something more than diabetes, I am not sure why you need disability. Last edited by Triv; 9/10/16 at 12:20 PM. Rea Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit 101

Disability Tax Credit 101

Its that time of the year again, the time when the tax man comes to call and we scurry to find any way to hang onto our hard earned dollars that we can. This is also the time of year when I find myself inundated with many questions regarding the Disability Tax Credit (DTC). I am not an accountant. I am not a lawyer. I am a mother who has been dealing with this issue since the beginning of time (or at least early 2000). Back then, the DTC was given to some people with diabetes and denied to others. Eventually it was given to those using insulin pumps but not those on injections. Finally after a long battle, a lot of letters and presentations, this ruling was changed and the discrimination faced by people living with diabetes was removed. The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) is given to people who are unable to perform the "basic acts of daily living" OR who require life sustaining therapy. While the argument as been made that people with diabetes are not able to perform the basic acts of daily living, the real case has been made that they require life sustaining therapy. If they do not take insulin they die. Its very simple. So what is the tax credit and why do you want it? Well it gets you money back on your taxes! Again, I am not an accountant but I think of it as my own extra RRSP or spouse to deduct off of my taxable income. If you pay in any income tax, you will see a bit more money coming back to you. If you have no income or very little income, this credit may still be important for you. It may reduce your income to the point that you now qualify for the GST. If you have a child with diabetes, it will mean that he/she now qualifies for a disabled child benefit which adds approximately another $100 to your monthly CTB. There are still many questions from people who are Continue reading >>

The Disability Tax Credit For People With Diabetes: Could You Be Eligible?

The Disability Tax Credit For People With Diabetes: Could You Be Eligible?

Home Living Well With Diabetes -Articles Support The disability tax credit for people with diabetes: could you be eligible? The disability tax credit for people with diabetes: could you be eligible? Canadian tax form. Personal income tax form used in Canada. While many people with diabetes might not describe their condition as a disability, people who spend a great deal of time and have great difficulty with their day-to-day diabetes management, may be able to apply for a disability tax credit from the Canada Revenue Agency. According to the Agencys website , The disability tax credit is a non-refundable tax credit used to reduce income tax payable A person with a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions may claim the disability amount once they are eligible for the credit. The rationale behind the disability tax credit is to provide relief to taxpayers for their disability costs, since these are additional and unavoidable expenses that other taxpayers dont face. The process of applying for the disability tax credit is prepared in conjunction with your doctor. He or she will submit the necessary application forms and backup material to the Canada Revenue Agency, if it is determined that you are eligible. Tobe eligiblefor the disability tax credit, you must meet all of the following requirements: You must have an impairment in physical or mental functionsthat is prolonged, which means it has lasted, or is expected to last, for a continuous period of at least 12 months. The impairment must be severe, and it must restrict you all or mostly all of the time (at least 90% of the time). Your severe and prolonged impairment must be certified by a qualified practitioner (in the case of a person with diabetes, a doctor). At the Canada Revenue Agency websit Continue reading >>

Cra Backs Down In Row With Diabetics Over Disability Tax Credit

Cra Backs Down In Row With Diabetics Over Disability Tax Credit

The Canada Revenue Agency took steps Friday to quell a furor over what critics were calling its heartless treatment of diabetics. Disability advocates and opposition parties have been excoriating the agency for weeks over the fact that hundreds of Canadians with Type 1 diabetes have suddenly found themselves ineligible to claim the disability tax credit, even though they’ve previously qualified for it. The CRA insisted there’s been no change in the eligibility criteria, which requires an individual to spend at least 14 hours a week engaged in activities related to the administration of insulin. But diabetes support groups pointed to a May clarification letter sent by the CRA to doctors who provide the medical information needed to support a claim for the tax credit. That letter said only in “exceptional circumstances” would adult diabetics need 14 hours a week to manage their insulin therapy; most would not _ which would mean they’re not eligible for the credit. The CRA said Friday that it will revert to the clarification letter that existed prior to May, and review all applications for the disability tax credit that have been denied based on the May letter. Diabetes Canada welcomed the move. Kimberley Hanson, director of federal affairs for the group, said she hopes the review “serves as an opportunity to make the application process clearer for those who need to access this much needed credit and ultimately provides financial relief and fairness for those living with Type 1 diabetes.” The advocacy group argues that the disability tax credit is essential to help diabetics pay for medication, medical supplies and devices and that the loss of the credit had caused enormous stress and financial hardship for those affected. Revenue Minister Diane Lebouthillie Continue reading >>

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