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Type 1 Diabetes Dark Circles Under Eyes

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. Many people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In some cases, skin problems can be the first sign that a person has diabetes. In some cases, people with diabetes develop skin conditions that can affect anyone. Examples of these conditions include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. However, people with diabetes also are more prone to getting certain conditions. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Some common skin conditions in people with diabetes: Acanthosis nigricans This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of the skin. Often, areas of tan or brown skin, sometimes slightly raised, appear on the sides of the neck, the armpits, and groin. Occasionally, these darkened areas might appear on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, or it can be associated with certain medical conditions. It is frequently found in people with diabetes. Allergic reactions Allergic reactions to foods, bug bites, and medicines can cause rashes, depressions or bumps on the skin. If you think you might be having an allergic reaction to a medicine, contact your health care provider. Severe allergic reactions might require emergency treatment. It is especially important for people with diabetes to check for rashes or bumps in the areas where they inject their insulin. Atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of blood vessels thickening of the vessel walls. While atherosclerosis most often is associated with blood vessels in or near the heart, it can affect blood vessels throughout the body, including those that su Continue reading >>

Dark Circles Under The Eyes! Really?

Dark Circles Under The Eyes! Really?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community An article in the Telegraph today about the diplomatic Mr Junkers comments about Mrs May referred to dark circles under the eyes as a classic T1 symptom! Is this something else to look forward to? T1 really is the gift that keeps on giving! Lol! Thoughts? novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member I have bags, but dark circles......no, cant say I have.... I have dark circles, but never heard it being related to diabetes before! I have bags, but dark circles......no, cant say I have.... Apparently a GP friend of the journalist said his was the case! An article in the Telegraph today about the diplomatic Mr Junkers comments about Mrs May referred to dark circles under the eyes as a classic T1 symptom! Is this something else to look forward to? T1 really is the gift that keeps on giving! Lol! Thoughts? I'd imagine the stressors encountered when running a country are more to blame than T1D... My eyes are fine So far touch wood mine are ok too - any other hidden surprises we can look forward to ?! Yes! Dark shadows around the eyes. It was very noticeable in my relative before diagnosis of T1. I have dark shadows around my eyes too. That just says uncontrolled diabetes are one of the many things which could lead to dark circles under the eyes. I suspect Mrs May is more likely to be suffering from sleepless nights. Especially as she has only had diabetes for 5 years. I'm more surprised that there is actually a link in between poorly controlled diabetes and eye shadows. I've been tr Continue reading >>

A Common Bond: Sharing Diabetes Diagnosis Tales

A Common Bond: Sharing Diabetes Diagnosis Tales

Get a group of women together who have given birth - particularly when in the company of an expectant mother, and more likely than not the topic of labor and delivery stories will come up. The tougher and longer the labor, then the more impressed are the listeners of the teller. A similar exchange of stories occurs when a group of parents who all have a Type 1 child get together. Instead of labor and delivery, the topic is about the often circuitous and frightening road parents took to a diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes. The higher the blood glucose levels at diagnosis, the more in awe we are (at least I am). Parents aren’t the only ones who share stories - Type 1s likewise will tell each other about how they came to be diagnosed. These stories typically have common threads: what were the symptoms experienced and for how long, how aware were they of diabetes and its symptoms, and unfortunately, there are some horror stories of medical practitioners that just wouldn’t listen. Our - more specifically my son’s - diagnosis story is benign and lacks any type of “wow” details. We fortunately were aware of the symptoms of diabetes, my son displayed classic symptoms, and my primary care doctor listened to me and my son and tested accordingly. In my travels in the World of Diabetes during the past year, I’ve listened to tens and tens of these diagnosis stories, and many are filled with perseverance, faith in what they believed was happening to them or their child, and sometimes even a little luck. I wanted to share some of the stories that struck a chord with me, for they further solidified for me how much we have to learn from each other in the diabetes community, and how much more we need to educate the wider community in general about this disease. I met one mom whose Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dark Circles Around Eyes Oz Symptoms Pre Dr

Diabetes And Dark Circles Around Eyes Oz Symptoms Pre Dr

Women with a history of gestational diabetes are at significantly increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes and many don't know Radiology; Rheumatology; Transplantation; Mcintire DD et al.: Pregnancy outcomes in women with gestational diabetes comparedwith the general obstetric Patient & Family Services. Persons with diabetes have a higher than normal potential for renal disease, Clinical Guidelines > ADA 2013 Guidelines - Diabetes and Pregnancy; ADA Guidelines: Detection and Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus GDM=gestational diabetes mellitus; OGTT=oral glucose tolerance test Chapter 9: The Diabetic Foot/Wound Care. diabetes type 2 diet australia. Doctors use glucose test strips to screen patients for diabetes. Insulin shock Risks, causes, treatment, and prevention. eat less of the foods you usually have. Diabetes and Pregnancy 37 An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline Diabetes and Pregnancy: CME Learning Objectives and Post-Test Questions LEARNING diabetes insipidus [in sipi ds] n. When consumed with food, moderate amounts of alcohol do not cause hypoglycemia (low blood With type 1 diabetes moderate consumption of The exact cause is unknown Diabetes And Dark Circles Around Eyes Oz Symptoms Pre Dr Diagnosis of diabetic coma. Meaning: The gray awareness ribbon is a symbol of diabetes asthma and ain cancer. Diabetes And Dark Circles Around Eyes Oz Symptoms Pre Dr signs Of Diabetes While Pregnant Free Human Anatomy and Physiology. See who you know at Bayer HealthCare Diabetes Care leverage your professional network and get hired. Pregnancy: women who are pregnant have an increased risk of diabetic retinopathy. People with type 1 diabetes have a pancreas that doesnt produce enough insulin or stops producing it altogether. This separation it seems mig Continue reading >>

Dark Patches Under The Eyes

Dark Patches Under The Eyes

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Ok, this isn't really a diabetes related problem, but nevertheless.... ...for years now I've always had dark patches under my eyes. My mother continues to insist this is because of a lack of sleep but then again anything to do with my eyes appears to have that cure, according to her. Anyway, I've just started to wear contact lenses and because I'm now starting to fiddle round with eyes a bit more, I've actually noticed just how dark my eyes are. 'Panda' eyes would be one way of describing them but really I'd say it's more a case of heroin addict meets corpse. What exactly causes this sort of morbid sallowness in my face, how can I prevent it from getting worse, and is there anything I can do to reverse the process? Do you have anyone in your immediate family with this problem? Dark patches under eyes usually is inherited. Some info here. I have this problem too... I don't venture outside without some concealer lest someone tells me (for the billionth time) that it looks like I've been punched in both eyes. It started with my first semester of college so of course everyone was convinced it was lack of sleep, but 8 years later, nothing's changed. Nobody in my family has this problem. I figure it has to with my diet - not drinking enough water or drinking too much caffeine or not getting enough of some essential nutrient. The only thing that sort of helps me is slapping on some super-duper strong expensive concealer... Ok, this isn't really a diabetes related problem, but nevertheless.... ...for years now I've always had dark patches under my eyes. My mother continues to insist this is because o Continue reading >>

Dark Circles Under Eyes By Diabetes 1?

Dark Circles Under Eyes By Diabetes 1?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does long term high HBA1C or constant hypos cause dark circles under eyes for diabetic 1? Also it affects my gut health i can feel, I had seriously dark circles under my eyes and bad stomach problems for about a year before was diagnosed. Thought had a stomach ulcer actually and doctor was giving me omeperzol for it. So I think you might be right! Just asking if it can occur even after i have had diabetes for over 15 years now. past 4 years the dark circles have gone worse. Might it be to do my swinging blood sugar levels? or my gut? Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family. Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Dark Circles Under Eyes?

Can Diabetes Cause Dark Circles Under Eyes?

Can diabetes cause dark circles under eyes? I have dark circles under my eyes. I want to know if diabetes is one cause of dark circles? Yes, the diabetes is one of the reasons that cause the dark circles under the eyes. And there are many other reasons to cause the dark circle under the eyes which you may take notice of. For example, if you often stay up late, smoke a lot, not wash the eye makeup clearly every night before going to bed or sleep pillow is too low and so on. If you own the diabetes complications, you'd better do the proposals. You must control blood sugar, reduce complications and development, peacetime life, control weight and so on. You had better be controlled in standard weight range pay attention to diet, not eating too much cholesterol food, such as liver and so on. You should try not to eat the food of the high sugar content, quit smoking wine, have good work and rest time, life style and so on. All this will help you not only treat the diabetes but also the dark circles under the eyes. Yes, the diabetes is one of the reasons that cause the dark circles under the eyes. And there are many other reasons to cause the dark circle under the eyes which you may take notice of. For example, if you often stay up late, smoke a lot, not wash the eye makeup clearly every night before going to bed or sleep pillow is too low and so on. If you own the diabetes complications, you'd better do the proposals. You must control blood sugar, reduce complications and development, peacetime life, control weight and so on. You had better be controlled in standard weight range pay attention to diet, not eating too much cholesterol food, such as liver and so on. You should try not to eat the food of the high sugar content, quit smoking wine, have good work and rest time, li Continue reading >>

The Truth About Dark Circles: Causes And Links To Diseases - Indiatimes.com

The Truth About Dark Circles: Causes And Links To Diseases - Indiatimes.com

From stress to those who are overworked, dark circles around eyes is something that plagues a lot of people. 'Dark circles under eyes symptom checker' is probably one of the most googled phrases, and people who suffer from this are desperate to find a permanent cure. Most of us blame dark circles on lack of sleep, exhaustion or staring at the computer screen for hours. From liver malfunction to vitamin deficiency, dark circles are caused by a number of factors. But the truth goes deeper than those dark pools you've tried so hard to fight. Experts and studies have linked dark circles to graver problems like anemia, liver disease and dehydration. Dr. Satish Mehta, Ophthalmologist from Moolchand Eye Clinic gives us an insight into the darker reasons of dark circles. First, lets understand how dark circles appear. We have tiny blood vessels, which are like a web under the skin. But these capillaries are so fine that the red blood cells queue up to pass through; in the process some of them leak in the surrounding area. Enzymes are produced during the cleaning up session. The breaking down of these red blood cells leaves them black and blue. The reason why this is so visible is that the skin around the eyes is the thinnest. Also read: Diabetes Can Lead To Five Different Types Of Diseases, Not Just Type 1 And Type 2 Aging - The skin under the eyes is thin and delicate to begin with. As we grow older, skin around the eyes becomes thinner making blood vessels more prominent, causing dark circles. Genetics - Hereditary and genetics can also play a big role in the development and dominance of dark circles around the eyes. Nutritional deficiency - Dark circle around the eyes can be due to poor nutrition. A healthy and nutritious diet filled with vitamins like A, C, K, E and nutrie Continue reading >>

Dark Circles Under The Eyes: Symptoms & Signs

Dark Circles Under The Eyes: Symptoms & Signs

Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology. Dark circles under the eyes are a common complaint of both men and women, although they can occasionally be seen in children. As people age, the skin becomes thinner and collagen is lost, sometimes enhancing the appearance of blood vessels beneath the eyes and making the area appear darker. Dark circles under the eyes are not necessarily a sign of tiredness , but stress and fatigue seem to worsen the facial appearance of many people, including their tendency to develop dark circles. Conditions like fluid imbalance or local swelling that lead to puffy or swollen eyelids can cause shadows that make the area under the eyes appear darker. Trauma (a " black eye ") can cause darkening of the entire eye area. Some people notice that dark circles under the eyes tend to run in families, as well. In most cases, dark circles under the eyes are not a sign of a serious medical condition. Continue reading >>

Dark Circles Under The Eyes?

Dark Circles Under The Eyes?

I have noticed quite often my daughter gets dark circles under her eyes. When she was first diagnosed she had this too. Is it common for type 1 to have this? It seems to come when her bg is high. Just curious if anyone else noticed this with their children. Bg is higher, skin looks pale, and dark circles, ...usually means her bg numbers are out of whack My daughter gets "allergic shiners" with foods she has sensitivities to, milk in particular, and those same foods, if she has them, will raise her BGs. I assume it's due to the immune system revving up due to exposure. People always notice that about my daughter too....weird....it will be interesting to see some different responses.... This is something our whole family has noticed when our daughter is VERY high, and we use it as one of our 'big symptoms.' Her face gets very pale with big dark circles under her eyes. How odd, my dd has always gotten allergy shiners, but the dark shadows were very pronounced under her eyes at diagnosis, in the previous days several people had mentioned it. There is a family picture with all of the cousins in it, it was just days before my daughter was diagnosed with D. Her eyes have really dark circles and a bit sunk in. She had lost so much weight, that picture bugs me because I missed seeing the signs that she was starving because of D. I wonder if the dark circles has to do with dehydration? High BG is thicker blood so less fluid...just a thought. YDMV, I guess...For us, dark circles under the eyes indicates a low. Completely pale indicates high bg; but pale with dark circles, or just dark circles by themselves, means she is very likely low! :cwds: for me it just means i've probably stayed up too late playing video games Oh absolutely. I say it to her all the time. She is blonde and v Continue reading >>

5 Signs Of Aging That Could Be Diabetes In Disguise

5 Signs Of Aging That Could Be Diabetes In Disguise

Research published this month in the Annals of Internal Medicine shows a significant spike in the rates of diabetes in the U.S. over the past two decades. In particular, the prevalence of prediabetes has risen from 5.8 percent between 1988 and 1994 to 12.4 percent between 2005 and 2010. Dr. Kathleen Figaro, an endocrinologist with Genesis Health System in Bettendorf, Iowa, told Healthline that a shrinking “cost per calorie” ratio in our food is partly to blame for the increase. “There is an excess amount of corn being produced, and it has to go somewhere. It is being used to make high-fructose corn syrup that is added to foods and decreases the price per calorie,” she said. As a result, we get dense, highly processed foods that are readily available, said Figaro. They can be bought cheaply in inner cities or other so-called “food deserts,” where access to quality, fresh foods is limited. Learn About the Type 2 Diabetes Diet » Get Tested by Age 45, Says ADA Tami Ross, a certified diabetes instructor in Lexington, Ky., who served as the president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators, told Healthline that age 40 is the “magic number,” when diabetes begins to sneak up on people. She said that everyone 40 and older should take the interactive type 2 diabetes screening test provided by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Find Out How to Face Diabetes Head On » Diabetes occurs when the body does not process sugar properly. Nonwhites, people who are overweight, and those with a family history of diabetes are at a higher risk. Almost 26 million people in the U.S., or 8.3 percent of the population, have diabetes, according to the ADA. Type 2 diabetes tends to affect people as they get older. About seven million people in the U.S. have type 2 di Continue reading >>

Dark Circles Around Eyes

Dark Circles Around Eyes

Why did my 3year old, recently (a week ago) diagnozed with T1D developed dark circles around her eyes? We were discharged last wednesday and since then she is doing good and keeping the recommended blood glucose levels. I have taken a pediatric optholmologist appointment tomorrow, but can't wait to dig this mine for any clues or additional information or things that I should aware before visiting the Dr. I'm sure your little-one will look better soon. When ones BG is out of control the body is struggling just to meet nutritional needs. It will take time to achieve a reasonably normal metabolism again...could be vitamin and mineral deficiency, most doctors test PWD's for these things nowdays.... You didn't say what prompted you to take your Daughter to the Dr. where she was diagnosed, or else I missed it. Normally with Type 1, a Person's immune system is attacking the beta cells, so the whole body is under attack in one way or another. As John said, nutrients are not going where they are supposed to go, so the body is dehydrated and is starving. Thus weight-loss, circles under the eyes, extreme thirst, frequent urination, pale, dry skin, unusual fatique, irritability can be some of the symptoms of DKA(Diabetes Ketoacidosis). I'm sorry to hear that she was dxd. but happy to know that she is doing much better. Bthatr...I don't know if you have been on this site: Lots of good info about other Children with Diabetes. I also came across this section: . It so frustrates me that Drs. still do not automatically pick a Child's finger to see if they have Diabetes...also Adults. Some of these stories...honestly!! :( Thank you so much for your responses and link that will keep my energy pump up high. She suffered with excessive thirst and urinating, with my little first-aid knowled Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: A Parents Perspective

Type 1 Diabetes: A Parents Perspective

Last summer our family changed forever when Lauren, our nine-year-old daughter, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. A whirlwind of shock, anger, and worry engulfed me as I watched an incurable chronic illness move into our home. Lauren was tired and noticeably thinner, with dark circles under her eyes, but we attributed these changes to her vigorous play at soccer and basketball camp. Her thirst was unquenchable. There was a cut on her leg that would not heal, and her coloring was not quite right. I barely paid attention to these symptoms at the time, dismissing them as no big deal. Hindsight is 20/20, but I could no longer deny that something was wrong when Lauren dropped almost twenty pounds in a three-week period. She was wasting away before our eyes. A trip to the pediatrician led to the discovery of sugar in her urine and a high blood glucose level, When the doctor said, I think youre headed down the path of diabetes, I felt a sick pit in my stomach. It seemed surreal when the doctor referred us to Park Nicollets International Diabetes Center (IDC). Lauren had all the classic symptoms of type 1 diabetes, a genetic autoimmune disease. For reasons not totally understood, the immune system attacks and destroys its own insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Because type 1 diabetics no longer make insulin, they must inject it several times daily or use a pump that dispenses the insulin through a small needle under the skin. Pricking fingers six or more times a day to test blood sugar is a requirement. It was a lifestyle change beyond imagination for most families, including ours. Following diagnosis, we spent hours with a nurse educator, dietitian, and pediatric endocrinologist, gaining an education about the foreign world of test strips, glucose monitors, insulin pe Continue reading >>

My First Year With Type 1 Diabetes

My First Year With Type 1 Diabetes

A later-in-life diagnosis causes one man to change everything. Its Halloween weekend, 2015 and Im traveling to New Orleans with a friend to attend a music festival. Something is wrong with me, I know that; I dont feel well. My girlfriend and I have noted I get up at night to pee, and Im thirsty beyond belief and very tired. My trip to New Orleans becomes the most fun and most dangerous trip of my life. Using the bathroom every hour, drinking too much too often, dehydrated beyond belief, sleeping not much at all. I sit at a bar table, drinking Red Bull and vodkas wondering why I was falling asleep. On the flight back, my thirst is unspeakable. I wait anxiously as the drink cart approaches, the attendant pours me a drink that I finish before she pours the next drink. On the three-hour flight home, I get up four times to use the bathroom. Upon returning home, I look in the mirror. I am skinny, pale, with dark circles under my eyes; my pinky finger is numb. I make an appointment. My blood sugar is 644 mg/dL. I have Type 1 diabetes. My entire existence changes who I am, what I do, what I think about, whats in my pocket, what I eat and when. I decide to change more no more fast food, no more soda, no more processed food. I make complete, balanced meals, track my blood sugar scores in an Excel spreadsheet and follow my averages. My friends knew me as a down for anything guy. After the initial shock, their appreciation and accommodation quickly diminishes. Many quickly forget I have specialized needs, and often times my subtle reminders are seen as a joke. At a friends house for dinner, I ask when dinner will be ready. The clock has struck eight, and I can feel my hands start to shake. The host makes a joke: Geez, youre so needy now with this diabetes. The group laughs; I laug Continue reading >>

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