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Type 1 Diabetes Breakthrough 2018

Pioneering Insulin To Undergo Human Trials In 2018

Pioneering Insulin To Undergo Human Trials In 2018

Pioneering insulin to undergo human trials in 2018 Pioneering insulin to undergo human trials in 2018 Manufacturers announce bovine insulin to be discontinued 18 July 2017 A new type of insulin touted as "the first of its kind" is set to undergo clinical trials this year. So far, concentrated insulins have not been able to work as quickly as currently available rapid-acting insulins like NovoRapid, Humalog and Apidra. But this new insulin is unique because it acts rapidly and, as it as ultra-concentrated, could lead to smaller insulin pumps that are easier to wear. The insulin could also be useful for people with diabetes who require more than 200 units of insulin a day. It was developed by the charity JDRF and the pharmaceutical company Arecor in 2016 and has been successful in laboratory tests. The next stage is to see how well the drug works in humans before it can be made available to members of the public. Rachel Connor, director of research partnerships for JDRF UK , said: "This is exciting news. This new rapid-acting, ultra-concentrated insulin is the first of its kind, and were looking forward to the results of the clinical trial. This project really highlights how working with industry can drive things forward for people living with type 1." Benedict Jephcote, Editor of Diabetes.co.uk, welcomed the new research. He said: "Insulin pumps have been getting steadily smaller over the years, but the size of the insulin reservoir currently impacts how small pumps can go. "If the new insulin proves successful in humans, insulin pumps will be able to use smaller reservoirs to carry the same number of units of insulin and this will allow smaller insulin pumps to be manufactured. It also means that insulin pens could become more compact too." If this new insulin is shown Continue reading >>

Breakthrough In Type 1 Diabetes Treatments!

Breakthrough In Type 1 Diabetes Treatments!

A new study demonstrates that a gene therapy approach can lead to long-term survival of functional beta cells as well as normal blood glucose levels for extended periods of time in mice with type 1 diabetes. Researchersused an adeno -associated viral (AAV) vector to deliver to the mouse pancreas two proteins, Pdx1 and MafA , which reprogrammed the alpha cells into functional, insulin-producing beta cells. Beta-cell replacement therapy is likely to fail because adding new cells will fall victim to the same autoimmunity that destroyed the original cells. The solution is to reprogram other cell types to functional beta-like cells, which can produce insulin but are distinct from beta cells and therefore are not attacked by the immune system. Researchers Gittes and first author Xiangwei Xiao of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine engineered an AAV vector to deliver proteins called Pdx1 and MafA, which support beta cell maturation, proliferation, and function, to the mouse pancreas. The reason why they picked alpha cells to reprogram is becausethey are plentiful, resemble beta cells, and are in the correct location, all of these factors facilitate reprogramming of cells. Comparing the gene expression patterns of normal beta cells and insulin-producing cells derived from alpha cells, the researchers confirmed that it was nearly complete cellular reprogramming. The gene therapy produced normal blood glucose levels in diabetic mice, for typically four months. Also, the therapy was able to generate functional insulin-producing cells from human alpha cells. Unfortunately, the mice did eventually return to the diabetic state, suggesting that it would not cure the disease. But viral vectors can be delivered directly to the human pancreas through a routinely performed no Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Breakthrough May Mean New Treatments

New Diabetes Breakthrough May Mean New Treatments

New Diabetes Breakthrough May Mean New Treatments New research may mean advancements in treatment options for individuals living with type 1 diabetes. Researchers from the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have identified the existence of stem cells in the pancreas that can be developed into beta cells that are responsive to glucose. The study addresses a critical factor in finding a cure for diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the pancreas produces little to no insulin. "The immune system of individuals living with type 1 diabetes is overactive and sees the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas as a threat to the body. As a result, it sets out to destroy them," said Dr. Bill Johnson. Johnson is a Dallas, Texas, physician who treats patients living with diabetes using stem cell therapy. About 1.25 million people in the United States are living with type 1 diabetes, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Numbers from the JDRF indicate that 40,000 people are diagnosed with the autoimmune disease each year. The JDRF also estimates that 15 percent of those living with type 1 diabetes in the U.S. are children. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 29 million people in the U.S. are living with type 2 diabetes, a form of the disease often caused by genetics, lifestyle choices and obesity. The CDC also estimates that 8.1 million of these people are undiagnosed. More than 1.4 million cases of type 2 diabetes are diagnosed nationwide each year, and more than one in every 10 adults over the age of 20 has the disease. Researchers have long believed that the pancreas contains progenitor stem cells that could help to regenerate islets, the cells of the pancrea Continue reading >>

This Scientific Breakthrough Could Be The Next Miracle Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

This Scientific Breakthrough Could Be The Next Miracle Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Attention, all type 1 diabetics: Your days of insulin injections may be numbered, thanks to a revolutionary new medicine. California-based company ViaCyte just developed a stem cell implant called PEC-Direct, and it could be the next miracle cure for diabetes. The implant grows insulin-producing cells from stem cells, which would eventually help manage glucose levels in type 1 diabetes patients. If the implant successfully passes the clinical trials, patients would no longer need to inject themselves with insulin. (And, more good news: researchers are looking into ways to reverse type 1 diabetes.) “Patients with high-risk type 1 diabetes complications, such as hypoglycemia unawareness, are at constant risk of life-threatening low blood glucose,” clinical trial investigator Jeremy Pettus from University of California, San Diego, said in a press release. “The PEC-Direct islet cell replacement therapy is designed to help patients with the most urgent medical need.” Placed just below the skin, these implants are no larger than credit cards—but they could have a life-changing impact for diabetics. As the stem cells mature inside the human body, they will become specialized pancreas cells that release insulin automatically when needed. “There are limited treatment options for patients with high-risk type 1 diabetes to manage life-threatening hypoglycemic episodes,” added ViaCyte president and CEO Paul Laikind. “We believe that the PEC-Direct product candidate has the potential to transform the lives of these patients.” Clinical trials just began last week. Two patients received injections of PEC-Direct implants and will be monitored for the next several months. If all goes according to plan, the cells will mature in three months and begin releasing insulin a Continue reading >>

Gene Therapy Restores Normal Blood Glucose Levels In Mice With Type 1 Diabetes

Gene Therapy Restores Normal Blood Glucose Levels In Mice With Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease in which the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, resulting in high blood levels of glucose. A study published January 4th in Cell Stem Cell demonstrates that a gene therapy approach can lead to the long-term survival of functional beta cells as well as normal blood glucose levels for an extended period of time in mice with diabetes. The researchers used an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector to deliver to the mouse pancreas two proteins, Pdx1 and MafA, which reprogrammed plentiful alpha cells into functional, insulin-producing beta cells. "This study is essentially the first description of a clinically translatable, simple single intervention in autoimmune diabetes that leads to normal blood sugars, and importantly with no immunosuppression," says senior study author George Gittes of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. "A clinical trial in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics in the immediate foreseeable future is quite realistic, given the impressive nature of the reversal of the diabetes, along with the feasibility in patients to do AAV gene therapy." Approximately 9% of the world's adult population has diabetes, which can cause serious health problems such as heart disease, nerve damage, eye problems, and kidney disease. One fundamental goal of diabetes treatment is to preserve and restore functional beta cells, thereby replenishing levels of a hormone called insulin, which moves blood glucose into cells to fuel their energy needs. But in patients with type 1 diabetes, beta-cell replacement therapy is likely doomed to failure because the new cells might fall victim to the same autoimmunity that destroyed the original cells. A potential solution to this problem is to reprogram o Continue reading >>

8 Amazing Breakthroughs In Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope

8 Amazing Breakthroughs In Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope

8 Amazing Breakthroughs in Diabetes Research That Are Giving Us Hope According to recent research , we're not entirely sure how many diseases the label 'diabetes' covers. But no matter what causes our bodies to struggle with their blood sugar levels, it's a serious condition that requires daily care. Scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Insulin producing implants made from stem cells Clinical trials began last year for testing for ViaCyte's PEC-Direct device ; a credit-card sized implant containing insulin-producing cells derived from stem cells. Previous research had shown the implants could mature and function inside patients. Together with a cohort of volunteers who started testing in January, the new research should tell us soon whether the technology can help people with type-1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. A drug on the World Health Organisation's list of essential drugs could have another purpose ; blocking a molecule implemented in the autoimmune response that can give rise to type-1 diabetes. Called methyldopa, the compound already has an important job treating high blood pressure in pregnant women and children. It's left to be seen if it could help reduce the incidence of diabetes in some way, but the fact it's already being used - rather than being stuck in the lab Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Trial Reaches Full Enrollment

Type 1 Diabetes Trial Reaches Full Enrollment

Type 1 diabetes trial reaches full enrollment Interim data analysis from T-Rex study expected in the first quarter SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - A clinical trial studying type 1 diabetes has reached full enrollment. The Sanford Project: T-Rex Study, a Phase 2 clinical trial conducted collaboratively by Sanford Health and Caladrius Biosciences, Inc., (Caladrius)(Nasdaq: CLBS), has completed enrollment of 110 children with type 1 diabetes. The study started with two sites at Sanford Health in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and Fargo, North Dakota, and expanded to 13 additional sites across the United States. The project is studying the potential of CLBS03, Caladrius' cell therapy consisting of each patient's own regulatory T cells, or Tregs, to help the body fight type 1 diabetes. Subjects will be followed for two years, with the primary endpoint of persistence of insulin production at one year after treatment. A planned, interim analysis of the first half of the participants at six months after treatment is expected by the end of the first quarter. "I am thrilled to have reached this important milestone," said Kurt Griffin, M.D., Ph.D. , director of clinical trials for The Sanford Project. "It has taken a tremendous amount of work from a large team to get this far. We still have another year of follow-up before we can really see how this treatment may be working." Griffin and Fargo-based pediatric endocrinologist Luis Casas, M.D. , are the study's principal investigators at Sanford Health. Individuals with type 1 diabetes experience a loss of insulin-producing beta cells as their immune system targets these cells inappropriately. Treg cells usually keep the immune system under control, but they are lacking in number and activity in people with type 1 diabetes. The Sanford Project: T- Continue reading >>

Stem Cells For Type 1 Treatment Could Be Found On The Tip Of Your Tongue

Stem Cells For Type 1 Treatment Could Be Found On The Tip Of Your Tongue

Stem cells for type 1 treatment could be found on the tip of your tongue Stem cells for type 1 treatment could be found on the tip of your tongue Immune disorder identified that could lead to type 1 diabetes treatment 31 January 2018 A pioneering research project will discover whether the secret to treating type 1 diabetes could lie in your tongue. 90 participants are being recruited to take part in the trial, which will focus on picking out stem cells from taste buds found in the mouth. The study will be led by researchers from the National Institute of Ageing based in America. The research will investigate whether stem cells taken from the tongue can be transformed and bred into cells capable of producing insulin in response to fluctuating levels of glucose. Five samples will be taken from each participant's tongue to provide material for the research . The stem cells will be fed a complex molecular mix under tightly-controlled conditions in an attempt to turn them into insulin-producing cells. If successful, the process could help towards developing specially-tailored treatments capable of replacing insulin-producing beta cells lost from the pancreas. The new cells could either be transplanted directly into the patient or put into the body using a state-of-the-art capsule as part of an encapsulated islet cells treatment. Researchers believe that, in the longer term, the beta-like cells could be produced directly from the patient's own taste buds providing a bespoke treatment that may also eliminate the need for strong drugs to suppress a patient's immune response following a transplant. The procedure could make transplants a more viable form of treatment for people with type 1 diabetes . However, there is a long way to go with many years of further research expected Continue reading >>

Could Gene Therapy One Day Cure Type 1 Diabetes?

Could Gene Therapy One Day Cure Type 1 Diabetes?

Expression of Pdx1 and MafA reprograms mouse alpha cells intobeta cells invivo Reprogrammed beta cells normalized beta cell toxin-induceddiabetic mice Reprogrammed beta cells delayed diabetes onset in autoimmuneNOD mice Expression of Pdx1 and MafA reprograms human alpha cells intobeta cells invitro For years, scientists have been interested in whether alphacells might be able to be reprogrammed to do the work ofinsulin-producing beta cells in type 1 diabetes. Cell Stem Cell demonstrates an earlylook how one day gene therapy might be used to permanently restorenormal blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes. The work, which reprogrammed the glucagon-producing alpha cellsto produce insulin, restored normal blood glucose levels in thediabetic mice for about four months. Using what's known as an adeno-associated virus, researchers atthe University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the Children'sHospital of Pittsburgh delivered two proteins, Pdx1 and MafA, tothe mouse pancreas that could reprogram alpha cells into betacells. In people, this could be done endoscopically, delivering aprotein-containing liquid to the pancreas via a tube that connectsit to the intestine. In the diabetic mice, it required surgery. At least initially,it worked. The alpha cells began producing insulin and restorednormal blood glucose levels in the diabetic mice for about fourmonths. Though the concept has so far only been tested in mice, itdemonstrates what could be an important new area of exploration insearching for a diabetes cure. Alan Attie, whose University of Wisconsin lab studies thegenetic and biochemical processes underlying genetics, called it"beautiful and elegant work." But it raised some questions that scientists are still toanswer: Why didn't the mouse immune system im Continue reading >>

Stem Cell Breakthrough Edges Scientists Closer To Effective Treatment For Type 1 Diabetes

Stem Cell Breakthrough Edges Scientists Closer To Effective Treatment For Type 1 Diabetes

Thanks to a breakthrough in stem cell research, scientists are tantalizingly close to finally achieving an effective treatment for type 1 diabetes. Using human embryonic stem cells, Harvard researchers have developed a technique that allows them to produce insulin-producing cells in quantities sufficient for both drug discovery and transplantation into diabetes sufferers. Due to the success of pre-clinical non-human animal trials, the researchers are hopeful that human trials could be initiated in just a few years. The work has been published in Cell. Diabetes is a metabolic disease which results in higher than normal blood sugar levels for prolonged periods. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. The former, which accounts for around 10% of diabetes cases, is an autoimmune condition in which the body attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Because insulin is not produced, the body is unable to regulate blood glucose levels. While sufferers can maintain relatively normal blood glucose levels with daily insulin injections, it is often not precise enough to properly control metabolism, which can lead to serious complications such as blindness. Researchers have therefore been exploring new ways to tackle the disease in order to overcome these problems. Given the vast therapeutic potential of stem cells, scientists wondered whether it might be possible to replace the beta cells in diabetic patients as a novel form of therapy. Although scientists previously managed to produce insulin-producing cells from human stem cells, they lacked many of the functional characteristics of pancreatic beta cells. However, the new technique pioneered by Harvard scientists allowed the team to produce hundreds of millions of mature beta cells from stem cells. Th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough? Scientists Discover Five Distinct Types

Diabetes Breakthrough? Scientists Discover Five Distinct Types

Diabetes breakthrough? Scientists discover FIVE distinct types Diabetes breakthrough? Scientists discover FIVE distinct types SCIENTISTS have discovered five distinct types of diabetes, offering new hope for better treatments, it was announced yesterday. Traditionally, the killer disease has been split into two types by medics. Type 1 is an auto-immune disease which cannot currently be cured. PUBLISHED: PUBLISHED: 23:30, Thu, Mar 1, 2018 Scientists have discovered five distinct types of diabetes, offering new hope for better treatments Type 2 on the other hand can be avoided by making lifestyle changes such as taking more exercise and eating a healthy diet. However, in the new study, researchers found that separating adult-onset diabetes into five distinct different types - rather than just type 1 or type 2 - could help to better tailor early treatment for patients. It would also represent a first step towards precision medicine in the disease, they said. In the new analysis, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal, five types of the disease were found. Each had different characteristics and were associated with different complications, illustrating the varied treatment needs of patients with diabetes. Lead author of the new study Professor Leif Groop, of the Lund University Diabetes Centre (LUDC), Sweden, and Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), said: Evidence suggests that early treatment for diabetes is crucial to prevent life-shortening complications. More accurately diagnosing diabetes could give us valuable insights into how it will develop over time, allowing us to predict and treat complications before they develop. Type 2 diabetes: Seven meal plans for your weight loss diet He added: Existing treatment guidelines are limited by the Continue reading >>

On The Cusp Of A Cure Heading Into 2018

On The Cusp Of A Cure Heading Into 2018

A recent article in Innovators magazine claims type 1diabetes will soon be a condition of the past. And next year could spell the beginning of theend. With diabetes affecting more than 400 million peopleworldwide, researchers are closer than ever to producinggame-changing treatments and cures for thoseliving withdiabetes. Recent research undertaken at the University ofCopenhagen, and published inNature CellBiology,shows that human cells can be used to 'produceinsulin-producing cells' - which 'in the future could betransplanted into diabetes patients'. "By identifying the signals that instruct mouse progenitorcells to become cells that make tubes and later insulin-producingbeta cells, we can transfer this knowledge to human stem cells tomore robustly make beta cells," explained Professor HenrikSemb,from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Stem CellBiology at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences. There have been a number of key developments in 2017 inthe fight against diabetes. new partnershipbetweenIBM and JDRF is trying to use artificial intelligence to deliver a'world without type 1 diabetes'. Continue reading >>

Rare Tumor Could Help Produce Insulin For Type-1 Diabetics, Studyshows

Rare Tumor Could Help Produce Insulin For Type-1 Diabetics, Studyshows

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) Researchers have a found a surprising potential ally in the search for a cure for Type-1 diabetes. Its a rare tumor that produces a lot of what diabetics are missing insulin. Type-1 diabetics have two problems. Their own immune system destroys the beta-cells that make insulin. To cure diabetes, you have to stop that autoimmune attack and then replace the destroyed beta-cells. CBS2s Dr. Max Gomez first met diabetic Alecia Wesner shortly after she was diagnosed with Type-1 diabetes at age 6. Her continuous glucose monitor and a small insulin pump have made managing her blood sugar easier, but not easy. Theres no break from Type-1 diabetes, theres no vacation, she said. Trying to manage all of this with a lot of things that beep to wake me up if something has gone too high or two low is a tremendous amount of work. What gives Alecia a lot of hope for the future is whats being done in the lab of Dr. Andrew Stewart at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He explains that even though Alecia has had diabetes for almost four decades, she still has a few beta-cells left. The key to getting them to replicate Alecias destroyed beta-cells, says Dr. Stewart, may lie in the DNA of rare benign tumors called beta-cell insulinomas. Those small insulinoma tumors in the pancreas have the genomic recipe, if you will, Dr. Stewart said. They now have the genomic wiring diagram or roadmap for knowing how to make beta-cells replicate. By sequencing every gene in these tumors, Dr. Stewart found the ones that put the brakes on beta-cell regeneration. As it turns out, certain drugs can take the brakes off the genes in normal beta-cells so they can start to divide. We found lots of candidates and were in the process now of screening drugs that take off these other br Continue reading >>

Video: Big Year, Breakthroughs Seen In Type 1 Diabetes

Video: Big Year, Breakthroughs Seen In Type 1 Diabetes

VIDEO: Big year, breakthroughs seen in type 1 diabetes CHICAGO In this video exclusive, Dawn Belt Davis, MD, PhD, associate professor in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison recaps some of the exciting developments in type 1 diabetes presented at the Endocrine Society Annual Meeting. Particularly interesting, Davis said, are discussions of the real-world use of an artificial pancreas system, for example, in athletes, in whom the algorithms may not work as well. Survival strategies for islet transplantation and improving outpatient hypoglycemia were also hot topics. CHICAGO In this video exclusive, Dawn Belt Davis, MD, PhD, associate professor in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison recaps some of the exciting developments in type 1 diabetes presented at the Endocrine Society Annual Meeting. Particularly interesting, Davis said, are discussions of the real-world use of an artificial pancreas system, for example, in athletes, in whom the algorithms may not work as well. Survival strategies for islet transplantation and improving outpatient hypoglycemia were also hot topics. Continue reading >>

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Here are some "bits and pieces" updates for December. Update on Dr. Faustman's Phase-II Trial of BCG Dr. Faustman's lab has published their Fall 2017 newsletter, which you can read here: This newsletter includes more information on her research, especially from the 3rd International BCG conference, The BCG Working Group, and the 2nd edition of the BCG and Autoimmunity book she edited. There are three pieces of new news there: The phase-II trial was fully enrolled in Summer of 2017. This is important because we now know when the trial will end. Since this is a five year study, they should finish collecting data in Summer of 2022 and publish before Summer of 2023. They have given BCG to the three untreated patients from their phase-I trial, so they will have data from six people to report in the future. The lab is going to be recruiting for more studies in the future, so would like to hear from anyone who is interested in participating. No details on future trials were provided. Another piece of news is that Dr. Faustman is branching out, and trying to apply BCG treatment to Fibromyalgia. This research is being done in collaboration with EpicGenetics, and they hope to start the trial in early 2018. If anything applicable to the type-1 world comes up in this research, I'll report it. Since Fibromyalgia is not generally considered an autoimmune disease, I'm not sure how much "cross pollination" of results there will be. You can read more about it here: DILfrequency Trial Completed There is a lot of research ongoing on IL-2 which is part of the immune system. About 18 months ago, I summarized all this research here: with an update here: One of those clinical trials was called "DILfrequency" and that trial has finished, and the results published. The purpose of that trial was Continue reading >>

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