diabetestalk.net

Type 1 Diabetes Awareness Color

Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

This is the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet, while the blue circle became the global symbol in 2007, it’s been fighting a battle to gain that recognition among diabetes organizations in the U.S. Why does that matter? Think pink ribbon. You thought breast cancer, didn’t you? That’s the power of one unifying symbol for a disease. Such a symbol can potentially generate greater prevention and care efforts, treatment advances, and more funding for research and a cure. The Blue Circle was created by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2006 as part of a campaign urging the United Nations to pass a resolution to recognize diabetes as a serious global health threat. The IDF was successful. According to the International Diabetes Federation, UN Resolution 61/225 recognizes diabetes as debilitating and costly, and encourages all nations to develop prevention and treatment policies. It also designates November 14 — the birthday of Frederick Banting, one of insulin’s discoverers — as World Diabetes Day to be recognized by the UN. The blue circle became the official logo mark for World Diabetes Day, and the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet only the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) adopted the Blue Circle as such. American Association of Diabetes Educators Sandra Burke, AADE’s President, said, “When you see the pink ribbon, the automatic recognizable symbol for breast cancer, you’re reminded breast cancer is serious. When people look at the Blue Circle we want them to be able to say, this is about diabetes, a disease that kills even more people than breast cancer. We need to solve this.” “By universally accepting a symbol for diabetes,” says Burke, “we have the beginning of developing a unified message that diabetes is serious Continue reading >>

Awareness Ribbons And Medical Ids: A Color For Every Condition

Awareness Ribbons And Medical Ids: A Color For Every Condition

People often want to wear the colors associated with their conditions. For example, here at Lauren's Hope, we receive messages from people with Multiple Sclerosis asking for more orange bracelets and from people with Addison's Disease asking for more light blue bracelets. People with Epilepsy request purple, as do those with lupus and fibromyalgia. Wearing the color associated with one's condition is an empowering choice, one that helps people raise awareness in a positive, intentional way. What Color Is Associated With My Condition? Looking for a little "cheat sheet"? We've got you covered. Here's a breakdown of some of the more common medical conditions and their associated awareness ribbon colors. Red: HIV/AIDS, Vasculitis, Heart Disease, Oral Cancers, and Multiple Myeloma Orange: Leukemia, Multiple Sclerosis, ADHD, Muscular Dystrophy, and Kidney Cancer Yellow: Bone Cancer, Endometriosis, Green: Hepatitis B, Liver Cancer, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Gastroparesis, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Cerebral Palsy, Celiac Disease, Lyme Disease, Organ Transplants, Organ Donation, Kidney Cancer, and Mental Health Blue: Dysautonomia, Transverse Myelitis, Tuberous Sclerosis, Colon Cancer, Hydranencephaly, Huntington's Disease, Prostate Cancer (light blue), Graves Disease (light blue), Genetic Disorders, Addison's Disease, and Arthritis Purple: Gynecological Cancers, Testicular Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, General Cancer Awareness, Epilepsy, Crohn's Disease, Colitis, Migraines, Sarcoidosis, Lupus, Fibromyalgia, Peripheral Neuropathy, Alzheimer's, Pulmonary Hypertension, Esophageal and Stomach Cancer Pink: Breast Cancer White: Lung Cancer Gray: Asthma, Brain Cancer, and Diabetes (T1D is also associated with blue ribbons and blue circles.) Gold: Childhood Cancers Some conditions use patt Continue reading >>

Learn About Type 1 Diabetes Awarenes Colors

Learn About Type 1 Diabetes Awarenes Colors

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease. Until now, the cure for type 1 diabetes had not been found. The scientists only found how to palliate, not cure the disease completely out of body. Since the dangerousness of the disease, International Diabetes Federation needs to give society awareness from this disease. So, they choose blue for type 1 diabetes awareness colors. Type 1 diabetes usually happened at children. For this reason it was called juvenile diabetes mellitus. Patients of type 1 diabetes had impairment on the production of insulin in their body. This impairment happened because there is destruction to beta cells of pancreas. In normal people, intake of sugars and starches will change to glucose by insulin hormone and distributed to body cells. However, for the patients of diabetes type 1, the lack of insulin hormone makes body could not distribute glucose to cells. Hence, glucose level in blood will rise. The high blood glucose makes an excessive in renal tubules, more than enough for renal tubules could reabsorb. Glucose will surge into urine. Since glucose can not diffuse to membrane cells, the osmotic pressure of extracellular fluids will increased make water from cells transfer out by osmotic. The excessive of glucose in renal tubules makes osmotic effect in there too. It causes reabsorption in tubular decreases, so massive fluid will loose in urine, fluid in extracellular will transfer out, in compensation intracellular fluid will transfer out too. Thus, the symptoms of polyuria (massive urine excretion), dehydration of extracellular and intracellular and increased thirst happened in diabetes patients. When high blood glucose chronic in blood vessel, the blood vessel will change abnormal, so blood supply to tissue is not adequate. This condition leads to t Continue reading >>

What Is The Purpose Of The Awareness Ribbons?

What Is The Purpose Of The Awareness Ribbons?

Awareness ribbons are defined as short pieces of colored ribbon folded into a loop, or representations of such, which are used in different parts of the world as a way for wearers of the ribbon(s) to make a statement of support for a cause or issue. Due to their ubiquitous nature, awareness ribbons have come to symbolize various meanings and causes depending on the colors and/or the patterns used. Today, awareness ribbons are now considered as a universal symbol for social or disease awareness, and a formidable path to cures. Two most well-known awareness ribbons are; the red ribbon in support of those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); and the pink ribbon which denotes breast cancer awareness.. 9/11 - This ribbon is a sign of mourning for those lost in the September 11th (9/11) attack. Mourning and remembrance of the Virginia Tech massacre Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (Now known as Primary Biliary Cholangitis) Blue Awareness Ribbons - Causes and Meanings Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) Beat Bullying (UK) Brachial Plexus Injuries - (Also Silver Ribbon with a bell) Canada's National Non Smoking Week Charge Syndrome (Royal Blue) Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Dysautonomia Epstein-Barr Virus Erb's Palsy Familial Polyposis Foster Care Awareness Hidradenitis Suppurativa (U.K.) Huntington's Disease Leukodystrophies Myositis Transverse Myelitis Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) awareness (blue) Blue ribbon (2 tone) National HydrocephalusAwareness. Hydrocephalus is a condition in which there is an excessive amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in chambers of the brain known as ventricles. The month of September is National Hydrocephalus Awareness Month. Type 1 Diabetes (Juvenile Diabetes) - Type 1 diabetes is a serious autoimmune disease where the pancreas stops producing i Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

We all know November is Diabetes awareness month, and November 14th is “World Diabetes Day.” But what is the meaning of the “blue circle” and why do we celebrate and advocate for diabetes so much this month? I asked Keegan Hall, the President of the Young Leaders in Diabetes Program, to talk a bit about the history. Many causes and conditions have a colored ribbon to symbolize the cause. In the diabetes community, we have done something very different—a blue circle. The blue circle is the universal symbol for diabetes. Until 2006, there was no global symbol for diabetes. The purpose of the symbol is to give diabetes a common identity. It aims to: Support all existing efforts to raise awareness about diabetes Inspire new activities, bring diabetes to the attention of the general public Brand diabetes Provide a means to show support for the fight against diabetes What is the history of the blue circle? The icon was originally developed for the campaign that resulted in the passage of United Nations Resolution 61/225 “World Diabetes Day.” The campaign for a United Nations Resolution on diabetes was a response to the diabetes pandemic that is set to overwhelm healthcare resources everywhere. The campaign mobilized diabetes stakeholders behind the common cause of securing a United Nations Resolution on diabetes. The United Nations passed Resolution 61/225 ‘World Diabetes Day’ on December 20, 2006. Why a circle? The circle occurs frequently in nature and has thus been widely employed since the dawn of humankind. The significance is overwhelmingly positive. Across cultures, the circle can symbolize life and health. Most significantly for the campaign, the circle symbolizes unity. Our combined strength is the key element that made this campaign so special. The Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Ribbon Claimed The Color Blue

Diabetes Awareness Ribbon Claimed The Color Blue

Pink is for breast cancer, red is for heart disease, purple for pancreatic cancer, and now, blue is for diabetes. I am glad diabetes is going to have a colored ribbon. If the ribbon can do for diabetes awareness what pink has done for breast cancer, it will be a good thing. At any rate, here is some information from the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) as we begin November – Diabetes Awareness month: New figures recently launched by the International Diabetes Federation indicate that the number of people living with diabetes has risen to 366 million. Diabetes is responsible for 4.6 million deaths a year – 1 every 7 seconds. Healthcare spending on diabetes has reached USD 465 billion. Diabetes is among the top 10 causes of disability, resulting in devastating complications such as blindness and lower limb amputations. All nations—rich and poor—are suffering the impact of the diabetes epidemic Diabetes is undermining global development. Diabetes hits the poorest hardest The IDF wants us to GO BLUE FOR DIABETES! Here are some of their suggestions: Organize a Flash Mob: Abu Dhabi, Colombo, and Tel Aviv are the latest cities to join the World Diabetes Day Flash Mob Challenge. Visit our website to find out what it’s all about and watch our tutorial video for tips on what you can perform to promote the diabetes cause in your area. Shine a blue light for diabetes: Cyprus, Finland, and Lebanon are the latest countries to confirm their participation in this year’s Blue Monument Challenge. See the complete list of participating monuments and keep on sending your confirmations to [email protected] If you have a building that’s already going blue, take a picture and add it to our Flicker pool. Take the Big Blue Test: Help get life-saving supplies to people with diabe Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Have A Month? Or A Color For Awareness?...does The World Know?

Does Diabetes Have A Month? Or A Color For Awareness?...does The World Know?

Pink this. Pink that. Everywhere pink, pink, pink. October is pink and it's hard to miss the pink, pink, pink. Why doesn't diabetes have a month or a color? Wow, it does? REALLY? Someone I consider active in the cause recently asked me this question and I stood dumbfounded as I realized that this person—in my estimation someone who is active, involved and diabetes-conscious—had no clue that November is Diabetes Awareness Month and/or that ‘diabetes blue’ is a thing. Now before you jump to conclusions and say that NO ONE could be active in diabetes causes and not know about the significance of ‘blue’ and/or November 14th...take pause. It could be perfect timing to lock, load, and shoot; but I look at it much differently. I ask, why that person doesn’t know. Why doesn’t your neighbor know? Why doesn’t your postman know? Why do so many…simply not know? And that my dear partners-in-battle falls squarely upon our shoulders. It is the fault of all of us, collectively, socially, as a group, as an entity, as a movement. If the world at large does not know about diabetes, the harm it can cause, the damage it can cause, that it is not caused by eating candy, and the list goes on and on…and on. If you blame the world at large, you have fallen prey as many before you who were locked and loaded to make a difference in this world. But at the end of the day, the world did not listen. And THAT is our fault. Why? Because it’s not their job to listen to us. It’s our job to get them to listen. To make them listen. To make the world around us understand a little more about this disease called diabetes. The ‘pink folks’? Ohhhhh they knew exactly what they were doing. And they didn’t care if others thought it was stupid or weird. pink handguns, pink Kentucky F Continue reading >>

1. Are You Aware Of Diabetes Awareness Month?

1. Are You Aware Of Diabetes Awareness Month?

Each year when November rolls around, people begin thinking about the common disease that affects around 29.1 million people in the United States alone. Diabetes affects people of all ages and causes many health concerns in the body. It is crucial people are aware of this disease and their risk factors towards getting it. This is why diabetes awareness month is so important for raising awareness of this disease and helping people understand how it can be treated. Understanding more about this special month and its symbolism will give people the knowledge they need to be protective of their health and monitor it. 2. Why Is Diabetes Honored With Its Own Month? While diabetes month was first named in 1975, it was not until a few years later this special day and month were officially proclaimed by the president and congress. Each year, on November 14, World Diabetes Day is celebrated around the world. On this day, special events are held to honor Dr. Frederick Banting, one of the discoverers of insulin. Because of his research, diabetic patients are able to safely control their disease and prevent damage to their body and the loss of their life. World Diabetes Day was officially launched in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation, in the hopes light would be shared on this disease so people could better understand it. The first few years of the celebration day were not as widespread as they are today. With the founding of the Diabetes Online Community, people have been able to work together, from all over the country, to coordinate special events to honor this day. 3. What Events are Planned For This November? The Theme of 2016’s World Diabetes Day will be “Eyes on Diabetes”. The full focus of this special event will be to inform the world of the importance of d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Ribbon As A Support For Diabetics

Diabetes Awareness Ribbon As A Support For Diabetics

People with diabetes will feel many serious health problems. In many cases diabetes can causes complications or death. For that, the support from family, friends, and colleagues will greatly help the people with diabetes to not give up with the disease. Support from family or friends will be very important and meaningful for the diabetes sufferer, they will be re energized to take routine medical check up so can get well as soon as possible. The support that can be realized in various ways. Attention and affection towards diabetics certainly very influential to get well immediately. Beside that, a lot of small things can express awareness for diabetics. Such as ribbon for HIV / AIDS, nowadays diabetes will also get support through diabetes awareness ribbon. Awareness ribbon becomes favorite way to express and show support and awareness for disease or organizations. Awareness ribbon is a great way to stole public attention, so they will give their affection for the disease patients. One of the most popular around the world beside HIV/AIDs ribbon is awareness ribbon for diabetes. Everyone knows that diabetes is one of the most deadly diseases in the world. So that the diabetes sufferer should get lots of support from entire the world. Awareness ribbon has various colors with different meanings of each color. If you want to know more detail about the awareness ribbons and the meanings of each color, check this review below and then show off your awareness for diabetes sufferer. Black ribbon means symbols of anti gangs, mourning, and melanoma. Then brown ribbon express anti tobacco. Then dark blue ribbon is a symbol of prostate cancer awareness, child abuse prevention, and arthritis. Grey ribbon is a symbol of brain cancer and diabetes, and then green ribbon usually used as Continue reading >>

Jdrf Is True Blue For National Diabetes Awareness Month

Jdrf Is True Blue For National Diabetes Awareness Month

Fall is arriving in all its usual glorious colors—pumpkin orange, apple red, forest green, and … blue? That’s right. Thanks to National Diabetes Awareness Month, blue is the color to flaunt this November. This year’s theme is “All for 1!” and the type 1 diabetes (T1D) community will have ample opportunity to showcase its team spirit. November is truly a month of wonders—World Diabetes Day falls on November 14, the anniversary of insulin discoverer Frederick Banting’s birth. But even before that, on November 1, JDRF will be celebrating the second annual T1Day. Inaugurated by JDRF on November 1, 2011 (11-1-11), T1Day is an occasion to use our collective voice to reach as many people around the world as we can, to raise awareness about T1D and celebrate the lives of those who live with T1D and those who love them. Just a few of the plans we have in store: the national office of JDRF is creating public service announcements that can be submitted to local newspapers; some chapters are organizing groups to deck themselves in “JDRF blue” and join the audiences of local television news shows; the Empire State Building in New York City will be lit up in blue on World Diabetes Day; and on T1Day, JDRF will be posting a continual stream of updates via its Facebook page and Tweeting every one minute past the hour, every hour. This is just a sample of the plans we’re putting into action. For the inside scoop on these and other exciting events, visit JDRF’s Facebook page and follow us on Twitter, now through the month of November. This year, there’s an especially meaningful way to get involved—as an advocate. JDRF’s most important advocacy goal this year is convincing Congress to renew the Special Diabetes Program (SDP). Established in 1997, the SDP has s Continue reading >>

Why The Blue Circle?

Why The Blue Circle?

I can't quite remember who asked me, but in front of San Francisco City Hall last Friday evening, during our World Diabetes Day celebrations, somebody pointed to my pin and asked, "Why the blue circle, anyway? What does that mean?" They also wanted to know why the logo didn't have the world "diabetes" stamped across it: "Who's going to recognize that this stands for diabetes?!" For goodness' sake, it's supposed to be like the ubiquitous pink ribbon for breast cancer, red ribbon for AIDS, or yellow ribbon for bring-home-the-troops. Setting the issue of why it's blue and a circle aside for a moment, can't we all agree that a symbol that speaks for itself is better than having to pin the word "DIABETES" on your lapel? I was especially surprised to discover that folks from the local chapter of the ADA (American Diabetes Association) weren't at all familiar with the blue circle campaign. I sort of forgave them for it last year, since it was still very new then, but now I'm thinking that that group — and this country at large, which doesn't play up World Diabetes Day a fraction as much as the rest of the world — may be suffering from some classic "not invented here syndrome." When you go to the ADA's website right now, for example, you see "American Diabetes Month," but nada on WDD. I hereby proclaim this Call to Action for next year's WDD: Let's do it up, right, America! And that means you, ADA! And that means you, Mainstream Media! This awareness campaign is gaining traction, with the likes of T1 rockstar Nick Jonas on board, but it seems like we have a long way to go to catch up with the Brits, the Germans, or the Australians, for example. And now for the Why Blue? And Why a Circle? I know from my previous research that this symbol was the brainchild of Kari Rosenfeld Continue reading >>

Awareness Ribbons Chart: Color And Meaning Of Awareness Ribbon Causes

Awareness Ribbons Chart: Color And Meaning Of Awareness Ribbon Causes

A - A + Main Document Quote: "Because many awareness ribbon colors may have multiple associated meanings, Disabled World is listing only awareness ribbons regarding health and disability meanings and causes." The use of various colored ribbons is designed to create public awareness to health, medical conditions, disability, and other issues. An awareness ribbon is defined as a piece of colored ribbon folded across itself creating a loop shape - or a representation of such. Today, the meaning of colored awareness ribbons are used globally as a way for wearers of the ribbon(s) to make a statement of support for a particular cause or issue. Probably the two most well-known awareness ribbons are; the red ribbon in support of those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); and the pink ribbon which denotes breast cancer awareness. The meaning behind the awareness ribbon depends on its color(s). Many different groups, foundations and organizations have adopted these ribbons as symbols of support or awareness - as a result, various causes may often share the same, or similar, ribbon color(s). How many awareness ribbons are there? This is a question we get asked quite often. With new awareness campaign days, weeks, and months - as well as new ribbon colors, constantly being created, we are not sure how many awareness ribbon colors there currently are - but there certainly seems to be a lot! We currently have over 80 different ribbon colors and designs listed below. Awareness Ribbon Color Meanings Jump to Ribbon Color: 9/11 - This ribbon is a sign of mourning for those lost in the September 11th (9/11) attack. Mourning and remembrance of the Virginia Tech massacre Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (Now known as Primary Biliary Cholangitis) Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS Continue reading >>

How Can You Help With Diabetes Awareness Month?

How Can You Help With Diabetes Awareness Month?

Educate Use this time to educate all of your friends, family, acquaintances, coworkers and anyone else about diabetes. Don’t just tell them you are diabetic though… tell them what it means to have diabetes, the management that is required, and what you go through on a daily basis. Start the conversation! Create a presentation about diabetes, then share it with your classmates, coworkers, etc. When someone asks why you’re poking your finger, tell them why – in detail! Share CDF educational videos and posts on social media. Check out our YouTube channel here. Wear blue – the color for diabetes – to show your support Add a Frame to Your Facebook Profile Picture 1. Go to 2. Search for “Children’s Diabetes Foundation” 3. Choose your frame 4. Reposition if needed 5. Click “Use as Profile Picture” Follow the Children’s Diabetes Foundation on social media to get involved in the conversation and to help spread educational messages. We aim to educate the public about type 1 diabetes and end the stereotypes that often come along with the disease. Check out our social media pages: Facebook: Twitter: Instagram: @CDFdiabetes Hand Out Educational Materials Check out our printable materials here! Donate Make your donation for Colorado Gives Day on December 5th, 2017 OR schedule your donation ahead of time. Your donation will help us win a portion of the $1 Million Incentive Fund from the #COGivesDay Program. After you donate, share why you donated on social media to encourage others to do the same. Don’t worry, you don’t have to be a Colorado resident to give to our cause! Interested in making your own fundraising page for the Children’s Diabetes Foundation? Watch this video to learn how. Write a Blog to Share Your Story We would love to hear your story to Continue reading >>

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting. Here at DiabetesMine, we’ve covered these November diabetes activities at length over the years. Please browse through this overview of posts we’ve written to get a sense of what happens when diabetes awareness becomes a national and international priority. Diabetes Awareness Month 2017 This year, we believe the need for diabetes awareness month is more important than ever. Many different diabetes organizations have a plethora of activities and initiatives, including the American Diabetes Association and JDRF that are both emphasizing the "invisible illness" aspect of living with diabetes. Our roundup explores all of the happenings within the USA and across the world. Diabetes Months of the Past Don’t miss our coverage of what happened for Diabetes Awareness Month last year, in both the U.S. and across the globe. You’ll read about efforts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), JDRF, Diabetes Hands Foundation, and other groups working to raise public awareness and make a difference for the Diabetes Community. You can also reflect back on the prior year, with our coverage of Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, when both the ADA and IDF focused on the theme of educating people about healthy eating. World Diabetes Day and the Blue Circle World Diabetes Day (WDD) was established by the International Di Continue reading >>

Ok, I’m Confused…the Symbol For Diabetes Awareness Is…what?

Ok, I’m Confused…the Symbol For Diabetes Awareness Is…what?

If you were to do a series of online searches on Diabetes Awareness symbols, chances are that you’d encounter just what we have: confusion. There truly are several symbols out there that represent diabetes awareness. Some are more popular than others, however, and that’s what we’re hoping to do with this brief list: to show you three of the most commonly identified symbols so that you too can join in the fight against diabetes. 1. A grey ribbon with a drop of red The drop of red is meant to symbolize the blood used to test blood sugar. In general, this ribbon tends to be the most popular of the three within the United States, as it has been around the longest. ★ TYPE 1 HAS THEIR OWN RIBBON? ★ Type 1 diabetes actually does have its own awareness ribbon. One half of the ribbon is blue, and the other is grey, which also has a drop of red. *** What’s our favorite way to show to demonstrate our diabetes awareness? We really like to: Sock It to Diabetes! Sometimes we’ll wear one blue sock with one grey sock. Or one orange, and one blue. Well, you get the picture. You can help us Sock It To Diabetes. 2. A blue circle As an attempt to unify the fight against diabetes, the United Nations (UN) introduced the blue circle in 2006. Blue, according to diabetesbluecircle.org, “…reflects the color of the sky and the flag of the United Nations,” while the circle is meant to symbolize unity. ★ Help a Patient with Leg & Foot Ulcers ★ Sometimes insurance isn’t enough when the only medication that gives you hope costs more than insurance will provide. This requires thousands of dollars in co-pays or other out-of-pocket costs. Hundreds of patients, many whom are diabetic, who are being treated are choosing between their health and their family’s financial liveliho Continue reading >>

More in diabetes